GR Griffin's History of Mississippi Primitive Baptists

Griffin's History: Chapter 1-History of the Church up to the Reformation
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 2-The European Baptists
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 3-Doctrine of the Church
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 4-Andrew Fuller on the Atonement
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 5-Modern Missions
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 6-The Hindos
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 7-Africa
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 8-West Indies
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 9-Polynesia
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 10-America
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 11-Strong Place Church, Brooklyn
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 12-Baptists in Mississippi
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 13-The Missippi Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 14-The Pearl River Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 15-The Union Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 16-The Yallobusha Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 17-The Primitive Baptist Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 18-The Lusascoona Regular Baptist Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 19-The Tallhatchie Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 20-The Noxubee Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 21-The Bethany Association
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 22-Benedict's History
 
Griffin's History: Chapter 23-Concluding Remarks
 

GR001 INTRODUCTION Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER I.

A BRIEF NOTICE OF THE CHURCH, UP TO THE REFORMATION.

 We are fully assured, by Divine authority, that the Mosaic dispensation of worship was put down by Christ and his Apostles, and the Gospel mode of worship set up. But the precise time when the first local Gospel church was organized, is a matter of inference only. In the second chapter of the Acts, we find the following brief history of the saints, and their practice: "Then they that gladly received His word were baptized; and the same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls; and they continued steadfastly in the Apostle's doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers. And fear came upon every soul; and many wonders and signs were done by the Apostles. And all that believed were together, and had all things common—and sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need. And they, continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, did eat their meat with gladness and singleness of heart, praising God, and having favor with all the people.

And the Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved." In Ac 2:47, we are told that "the Lord added to the church" but in Ac 2:41, "church" is omitted. Therefore, from this fact, as well as the general narrative, we are fully persuaded that there was no regularly organized local church, when "there were added unto them about three thousand souls." But it is more than probable, that this great addition "unto them," led to an immediate organization, for in Ac 2:47, we learn that "the Lord added to the church."

In Ac 5:11, we are informed that 'great fear came upon all the church" in consequence of a signal judgment inflicted upon a couple of hypocrites who "lied unto God," by pretending to give that which they did not give—by pretending to do that which they did not do—by trying to obtain a good name in the church for liberality and benevolence, regardless of truth and christian sincerity.

 In the Ac 8, we learn that "There was a great persecution against the church which was at Jerusalem; and they were all scattered abroad throughout the regions of Judea and Samaria, except the Apostles. Therefore, they that were scattered abroad went every where preaching the word." Some of "these travelled as far as Phenice, and Cyprus, and Antioch, preaching the word to the Jews only. And some of them were men of Cyprus and Syrene, which, when they were come to Antioch, spoke unto the Grecians, preaching the Lord Jesus. And the hand of the Lord was with them; and a great number believed and turned unto the Lord. Then tidings of these things came unto the ears of the church which was in Jerusalem, and they sent forth Barnabas, that he should go as far as Antioch"—perhaps to see if these things be of God or of men—for "when he came and had seen the grace of God, he was glad," which seems to express a previous doubt, or at least a fear.

Barnabas now left for Tarsus to seek Saul; and when he had found him he brought him to Antioch, it is more than probable, for the purpose of constituting a church. Be that as it may, "A whole year they assembled themselves with the church, and taught much people." And from this same church these same two Apostles were sent by the Holy Ghost to set things in order, and ordain Elders in all the churches as overseers thereof. Having accomplished this object they returned to Antioch.

In process of time a difficulty arose in Antioch church relative to circumcisions; and "Paul and Barnabas, and certain other of them" were sent "up to Jerusalem; unto the Apostles and Elders about this question. And the Apostles and Elders came together for to consider of this matter." After the discussion was over, which seems to have been conducted by lay members, Elders and Apostles —"Then pleased it the Apostles and Elders, with the whole church, to send chosen men of their own company to Antioch, with Paul and Barnabas, namely: Judas, surnamed Barsabas, and Silas, chief men among the brethren. And they wrote a letter by them after this manner: The Apostles and Elders, and brethren send greeting unto the brethren which are of the Gentiles, in Antioch, and Syria, and Cillicia," &c. This latter concludes thus: "For it seemed good to the Holy Ghost, and to us, to lay upon you no greater burden than these necessary things; that ye abstain from meats offered to idols, and from blood, and from things strangled, and from fornication; from which, if ye keep yourselves, ye shall do well. Fare ye well."

So when they were dismissed, they came to Antioch; and when they had gathered the multitude together, they delivered the epistle; which, when they had read, the rejoiced for the consolation." And so ended the first regularly conducted church difficulty under the Gospel dispensation.

The foregoing we have gleaned from the Acts, which is about all the history of the visible church that we can gather from an inspired writer. There are many letters, written by inspiration to the local churches, which incdentally, throw additional light on their history; but our limits constrain us to pass on. We must now leave Jerusalem and follow the church westward, and that, too, without an inspired guide.

The number of the local churches in the Apostolic day is unknown to us—neither can we learn their constitutions, rules of decorum, or the terms on which sister churches, of that day, were associated together. These external arrangements must necessarily be left to the local churches, to be managed according to circumstances. Hence, where persecution raged against them, they were constrained to adopt rules, to govern their meetings, which were unnecessary when they were permitted to meet openly.Christ and His Apostles had revolutionized the mode of worship, and set up the Gospel Kingdom. The Comforter had sent Paul and Barnabas to ordain Elders in all the churches, as overseers thereof. Christ commanded His Apostles to go into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature—and they acted accordingly. The Comforter commanded the Elders to feed the church of God which he hath purchased with His own blood—and they acted accordingly. The former acted in the capacity of revolutionary officers, the latter as household or civil officers.

Although we cannot learn the precise time that the Apostolic churches existed, yet we know, that it was comparatively a short period, and that the part of the world in which they were located, has, for many long centuries, been buried in Egyptian darkness, so far as true Christianity is concerned. The mystery of iniquity began to work in the days of the Apostles, and in process of time, became so overwhelming in the local churches that the true followers of Christ were constrained to withdraw from the popular church and form a separate connection, on Apostolic principles.

It is not my object to write a history of the Church, but simply to show the general drift of her travels up to the present century. Therefore, it is sufficient for my purpose to say, that a separation took place at an early day. And Baptist historians generally agree, that the true church passed up through the Novations, the Paulicians, the Paterines, and the Waldenses, to the days of the reformation. These, however, are generic terms similar to "Protestant" of the present day. The want of proper attention to this fact, has led many well meaning persons astray, relative to the doctrine and practice approved by these people. Suppose a history of the Protestants of the 19th century was written—yea, suppose a full history of all the people called Baptists only, was written, how much inconsistency in doctrine and practice could be handed down to future generations? A flood of errors, and hearsies, and superstitions, from the mouth of the Serpent, has followed after the Church, from Jerusalem, through Western Asia, Southern Europe, and North America—and had it been possible, the very elect would have been deceived and carried away by those signs and lying wonders which the followers of anti— Christ hath power to do in the sight of men.Satan's greatest efforts have been directed against the true Church, not only to annoy the saints, but to cast a blur upon the religion of their Lord and Master. In all the travels of the Church, he has hovered around her, with transformed angels of light, who will at times approximate so near the truth, as to render it difficult for the "very elect," and impossible for the natural man, to discover their hypocrisy. Yea, these incarnate fiends of darkness, like those of old, will at times admit the truth of God, and at the same time burlesque it, as being unprofitable, and   therefore should be hid from men, being in its tendency a licentious doctrine.

Search the Scriptures, and you will find that those incarnate enemies of God, who have made hypocritical pretensions to His worship, while warring against His saints, and blurring the character of true Christianity, are the characters against whom all the gospel woes are pronounced.

Church history, except what little can be gleaned from the inspired writers, is, at best, nothing more than the traditions of men. Therefore, though it might be reliable, as a record of facts and events as they transpired, yet, it only portrays the history of uninspired fallible men. But when we consider that the true followers of Christ have generally been hid from the world, and when seen always hated, and every where spoken against—and, in addition to this, when we consider the great anxiety of the followers of antiChrist, to establish their false doctrine and practice, and for this purpose shaping history, by misrepresenting some facts and omitting others, by false and illegitimate inferences—then, we shall feel with additional force, the preat propriety of cleaving to that Book, which we recognize as the only rule of faith and practice. And, when we still go forward and search the Scriptures, and find that even the true visible church is not infallible, but liable to error, and that truth and falsehood are eternal opposites, and that the practice of an error by saints or sinners, for any length of time, can never make it right, then will the propriety of searching the Scriptures as our only rule, be still more forcibly riveted upon our minds. Hence, it seems much more consistent with Christian propriety to measure ourselves by the Divine standard, in order to prove our legitimacy, than to go to history for the purpose of proving a regular succession. Though God has no doubt reserved to Himself, in all ages of the Gospel day, a people who never bowed the kneel to Baal, yet, to say that the legitimacy of His visible church depends on proving a regular succession from the days of the Apostles, would be laying an unnecessry burden upon the household of faith. The visible church, as organized under the reign of the Comforter, was never designed, in whole or in part, to procure the eternal salvation of God's people; but seems to be designed for their salvation from error and delusion—false doctrine and false practice—to gather them together into one fold, through the instrumentality of under— shepherds, where they are to be fed, and edified, and comforted. Here "all things must be done decently and in order." Hence, it would seem sufficient without any concern about a regular succession, that we fellowship no disorder, which comes within the range of our knowlegde.

THE WALDENSES

We shall here proceed to give a few quotations relative to these people, promiscuously taken from Jones' Church History:  "In articles of faith the authority of the Holy Scriptures is the highest, and for that reason it is the standard of judging, so that whatsoever doth not agree with the word of God, is deservedly to be rejected and avoided.

"The decrees of preachers and counsels are only so far to be approved as they agree with the word of God.

"We believe that there is one God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

"The Scriptures teach us, that there is one God, almighty, unbounded in wisdom, and infinite in goodness, and who, in His goodness, has made all things. For He created Adam after His own image and likeness, but through the enmity of the devil, and his own disobedience, Adam fell, sin entered into the world, and we became transgressors in and by Adam.

"Christ had been promised to the fathers who received the law, to the end that, knowing their sin by the law, they might desire the coming of Christ to make satisfaction for their sins, and to accomplish the law by Himself.

"At the time appointed of the Father, Christ was born —a time when iniquity every where abounded—to make it manifest that it was not for the sake of any good in ourselves, for all were sinners, but that He, who is true, might display His grace and mercy towards us.

"Christ is our life, and truth, and peace, and righteousness, our shepherd and advocate, our sacrifice and priest, who died for the salvation of all who should believe, and rose again for their justification.

"That is the church of Christ, which hears the pure doctrine of Christ, and observes the ordinances instituted by him, in whatsoever place it exists.

"He is our mediator and advocate, nor is there any other name given under Heaven by which we can be saved. In His name alone, we call upon the Father—using no other prayers than those contained in the Holy Scriptures, or such as are in substance agreeable thereto.

"Ministers of the church ought to be unblamable, both in life and doctrine; and if found otherwise, that they .ought to be deposed from their office, and others substituted in their stead; and that no person ought to presume to take that honor unto himself but he who is called of God, as was Aaron; that the duties of such are, to feed the flock of God, not for filthy lucre's sake, or as having dominion over God's heritage, but as being examples to the flock, in word, in conversation, in charity, in faith, and in chastity.

"All those in whom the fear of God dwells, will thereby be led to please him, and to abound with good works which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them, which are: Love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, gentleness, sobriety, and the other good works enforced in the Holy Scriptures.

"We consider it to be our duty to beware of false teachers, whose object is to divert the minds of men from the true worship of God, and to lead them to place their confidence in the creature, as well as to depart from the good works of the Gospel, and to regard the inventions of men.

"We have ever regarded the inventions of men, in the affairs of religion, as an unspeakable abomination before God.

"We hold in abhorrence all human inventions, as proceeding from anti— Christ, which produce distress, and are prejudicial to the liberty of the mind.

"We consider the sacraments as signs of holy things, or as the visible emblems of invisible blessings. We regard it as proper, and even necessary, that believers use these symbols, or visible forms, when it can be done. Notwithstanding which, we maintain that believers may be saved without these signs, when they have neither place nor opportunity of observing them.

"We acknowledge no sacraments, as of Divine appointment, but baptism and the Lord's supper.

"We honor the secular powers, with subjection, obedience, promptitude and payment.

"Although anti—Christ was conceived in the days of the Apostles, he was then in his infancy, imperfect and unformed, rude, unshapen, and wanting utterance. He then wanted those hypocritical ministers and human ordnances, and the outward show of religious orders, which he afterwards obtained. As he was destitute of riches and other endowments necessary to allure to himself ministers  for his service, and to enable him to multiply, defend, and protect his adherents, so he also wanted the secular power to force others to forsake the truth and embrace falsehood. But growing up in his members, that is, in his blind and dissembling ministers, and worldly subjects, he at length arrived at full maturity, when men, whose hearts were set upon this world, blind in the faith, multiplied in the church, and by the union of church and State, got the power of both into their hands.

"Christ never had an enemy like this; so able to pervert the way of truth into falsehood, insomuch that the true church, with her children, is trodden under foot. He robs the Savior of His merits, and the sufficiency of His grace in justification, regeneration, remission of sins, in sanctification, establishment in the faith, and spiritual nourishment. He seduces the people from Christ, drawing off their minds from seeking those blessings in Him, by a lively faith in God, in Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit, and teaching his followers to expect them by the will, and pleasure, and works of anti-Christ.

"He makes use of an outward confession of faith; and therein is verified the saying of the Apostle: 'They profess in words that they know God, but in works they deny him.' He boasts of numerous miracles, even as the Apostle foretold, 'Whose coming is after the working of Satan, with all miracles and signs, and lying wonders, and with all deceivableness of unrighteousness.' He has an outward show of holiness, consisting in prayers, fastings, watchings, and alms deeds, of which the Apostle testified, 'Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof.

"Thus it is that anti—Christ covers his lying wickedness as with a cloak or garment, that he may not be rejected as a pagan or infidel, and under which disguise he can go on practising his villainies boldly, and like a harlot. But it is plain from both the Old and New Testaments, that a christian stands bound by express command to separate himself from anti—Christ.

"It is manifest from the New Testament, that the Lord is come, and hath suffered death, and he might gather together in one the children of God; and it is on account of this unity in the truth, and their separation from others, that it is said, Mt 10., "I am come to separate a man from his father, and to set the daughter against her mother, and the daughter—in—law against her mother—in—law, and those of a man's household shall be his enemies.   Christ hath enjoined this separation when he said: 'Whosoever doth not forsake father and mother, &c, cannot be my disciple", And again, "Beware of false prophets which come to you in sheep's clothing." Again, 'Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees—and take heed lest any man seduce you, for many shall come in My name and seduce many.' And in the book of the revelation he warns by His own voice, saying 'Come out of her My people, and be not partakers of her sins, that ye receive not of her plagues; for her sins are come up unto heaven, and the Lord remembereth her iniquity.' The Apostle says the same, 'Have no fellowship with unbelievers, for what communon hath righteousness with iniquity, or what agreement hath light with darkness, or what part hath a believer with an infidel, or the temple of God with idols? Wherefore, come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch no unclean thing, and I will receive you, and be a father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty.

"Thus, as the Lord is pleased to enable us, and so far as our understandings are instructed into the path of duty, we attach ourselves to the truth of Christ, and to His church, how mean soever she may appear in the eyes of men. We therefore, have thought it good to make this declaration of our reasons for departing from anti— Christ, as well as to make known what kind of fellowship we have, to the end, that if the Lord be pleased to impart the knowledge of the same truth to others, those that receive it may love it together with us. It is our desire also, that if, peradventure, others are not sufficiently enlightened, they may receive assistance from this service, the Lord succeeding it by his blessing. On the other hand, if any have received more abundantly from Him, and in a higher measure, we desire with all humility to be taught, and instructed better, that so we may rectify whatever is amiss."


Thus wrote the Waldenses more than seven hundred years ago, while struggling against the first beast. The second beast, which John saw coming up as the other went down, has the external appendages of a lamb, but inwardly he is a dragon every whit. And he exerciseth all the power of the first beast, which was before him. Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast.

GR002 A Brief Notice of The History of European Baptist's CHAPTER II.

CHAPTER II.
A BRIEF NOTICE OF THE HISTORY OF THE EUROPEAN BAPTISTS.
Dr. Mosheim, a learned church historian, of the Luther— an order, and strongly prejudiced against the Baptist, thuswrites concerning them: "The true origin of that sect which acquired the denomination of Anabaptists by their administering anew the rite of baptism to those who come over to their communion, and derived that of Mennonites from the famous man to whom they owe the greatest part of their present felicity, is hid in the remote depth of antiquity, and is, of consequence, extremely difficult to be ascertained." Here is a frank acknowledgment by a learned opponent of the Baptist that their origin was more than a century ago, "Hid in the remote depth of antiquity."

Again, the same historian says, "The modern Mennonites (Baptists) not only consider themselves as the descendants of the Waldenses, who were so grievously oppressed and persecuted by the despotic heads of the Roman church, but pretend, moreover, to be the purest offspring of these respectable sufferers, being equally adverse to all principles of rebellion on the one hand, and all suggestions of fanaticism on the other." The careful reader will here notice an allusion to an important fact, too often overlooked by others, that is, that Waldenses is a genuine term, similar to that of Protestant, of the present day—covering many sects, many creeds, and many rules of practice. To prove this conclusively, we will make a short quotation from the same author, bearing on this point, viz: "It must be carefully observed, that through all these projectors of a new, unspotted and perfect church, were comprehended under the general denomination of Anabaptists, on account of their opposing the baptism of infants, and their rebaptising such as had received that sacrament in a state of childhood in other churches, yet they were, from their origin, subdivided into various sects, which differed from each other in points of no small moment." It appears, then, from the testimony of Dr. Mosheim, that the Waldenses, previous to the Reformation, were divided into different denominations, and, that the Baptists, subsequent to the Reformation, were "subdivided into various sects which differed from each other in points of no small moment." And this testimony could be amply corroborated from other sources, were it necessary.

As Dr. Mosheim was a member of the Lutheran church, the eldest daughter of the Roman lady, and consequently not a friend to the Baptists, we will extract some more statements before he is dismissed from the stand, viz: "Before the rise of Luther and Calvin, (that is before the Reformation,) they lay concealed in almost all the countries of Europe, particularly in Bohemia, Moravia, Switzerland and Germany, many persons who adhered tenaciously to the following doctrine, which the Waldenses, Wickliffites and Hussites had maintained, some in a more disguised, and others in a more open and public manner, viz: "That the kingdom of Christ, or the visible church he had established upon earth, was an assembly of real and true saints, and ought, therefore, to be inaccessible to the wicked and unrighteous, and also exempt from all those institutions which human prudence suggests, to oppose the progress of iniquity, or to correct and reform transgressors." Again: "It is true, indeed, that many Anabaptists suffered death, not on account of their being considered as rebellious subjects, but merely because they were judged to be incurable heretics; for, in this century, the error of limiting the administration of baptism to adult persons only, and the practice of rebaptising such as had received that sacrament in a state of infancy, were looked upon as most flagitious and intolerable heresies."

When we consider that Dr. Mosheim is one of the most learned church historians, that has ever written on the subject, and, that he entertained no partiality in favor of the Baptists, we feel fully authorized to accept the foregoing as reliable testimony in their favor. By a careful examination and comparison of these extracts, it will be seen, that there was a sect in Europe, whose origin was hid in the remote depths of antiquity, who practised Baptist principles, and hence, subsequent to the Reformation, acquired the denomination of Anabaptists—that they lay concealed in almost all European countries, particularly in Bohemia, Moravia, Switzerland and Germany—and that they adhered tenaciously to the following doctrine, viz: "That the kingdom of Christ, or the visible church he had established upon earth, was an assembly of true and real saints, and ought, therefore, to be inaccessible to the wicked and unrighteous, and also exempt from all those institutions which human prudence suggests, to oppose the progress of iniquity, or to correct and reform transgressors." And it will be also seen, that many Anabaptists suffered death, not on account of their being considered as rebellious subjects—for they were equally adverse to all principles of rebellion, on the one hand, and all suggestions of fanaticism on the other—but they were punished with death merely because they were judged to be incurable heretics.

The witness testifies that the Baptists were "subdivided into various sects, which differed from each other in points of no small moment." Hence the gross injustice of applying the  inconsistencies and bad conduct of some Baptists, indiscriminately, to all the sects bearing that name.

ENGLISH BAPTISTS.

The reformation having somewhat abated the spirit of persecution, and enlightened the minds of men, on the subject of religious rights, we find the Baptists organizing themselves into local churches, in the various countries of Southern and Western Europe. They were divided into two principal sects, especially in Great Britain, and were denominated Particular Baptists, and General Baptists. In the early part of the 16th century, churches were organized in and about London, of both denominations. They differed principally on points of doctrine. The General Baptists were Arminians, and the Particular Baptists were Predestinarians. The modern Missionary scheme was then unknown among the Baptists.

In 1689 a general assembly of the Particular Baptists of England and Wales, was held in London, for the purpose of forming a general Union, by setting forth the articles of faith upon which they were organized, which they honestly believed, to which they held privately and publicly, and according to which they acted. These articles of faith are divided into thirty— four chapters. They are in substance the same as those of the Primitive or Old School Baptists of this day. Hence, it is only necessary here to give a few extracts upon leading points of  difference between them and the Arminian Baptists:

"ADVERTISEMENT.

"We, the Ministers and Messengers of, and concerned for upwards of one hundred baptized congregations in Wales, (denying Arminianism,) being met together in London, from the third of the seventh month to the eleventh of the same, 1689, to consider of some things that might be for the glory of God, and the good of these congregations, have thought meet (for the satisfaction of all other christians that differ from us in the point of baptism,) to recommend to their perusal the Confession of our Faith, printed for, and sold by, John Marshall, at the Bible, in Grace Church street, which confession we own, as containing the doctrine of our faith and practice, and do desire that the members of our churches respectively do furnish  themselves therewith."

GR003 DOCTRINE CHAPTER III

DOCTRINE
“OF GOD'S DECREE.â€
"1. God hath decreed in Himself from all eternity, by the most wise and holy counsel of His own will, freely and unchangeably, all things whatsoever; yet so as thereby is God neither the author of sin, nor hath fellowship with any therein, nor is violence offered to the will of the creature, nor yet is the liberty or contingency of second causes taken away, but rather established, in which appears his wisdom in disposing all things, and power and faithfulness in accomplishing his decree.

2.    Although God knoweth whatsoever may, or can come to pass upon all supposed conditions, yet hath he not decreed anything because he foresaw it as future, or that which would come to pass upon such conditions.

3.    By the decree of God, for the manifestation of His glory, some men and angels are predestinated, or foreordained to eternal life, through Jesus Christ, to the praise of His glorious grace—others being left to act in their sin to their just condemnation, to the praise of His glorious justice.

4.    These angels and men thus predestinated, and foreordained, are particularly and unchangeably designed, and their number so certain and definite, that it cannot be either increased or diminished.

5.    Those of mankind that are predestinated to life, God, before the foundation of the world was laid, according to His eternal, immutable purpose, and the secret counsel and good pleasure of his will, hath chosen in Christ unto everlasting glory, out of his mere free grace and love, without any other thing in the creature as a condition or cause moving him thereto.

 As God hath appointed the elect unto glory, so he hath by the eternal and most free purpose of his will,foreordained all the means thereunto, wherefore they who are elected, being fallen in Adam, are redeemed by Christ, are effectually called unto faith in Christ, by His spirit working in due season, are justified, adopted, sanctified, and kept by his power through faith unto salvation; neither are any other redeemed by Christ, or effectually called, justified, adopted, sanctified, and saved, but the elect only.

6.    The doctrine of this high mystery of predestination is to be handled with special prudence and care, that men attending the will of God revealed in His word, and yielding obedience thereunto, may, from the certainty of their effectual vocation, be assured of their eternal election; so shall this doctrine afford matter of praise, reverence, and admiration of God, and of humility, diligence, and abundant consolation, to all that sincerely obey the Gospel."

"OF DIVINE PROVIDENCE.â€
"1. God, the Creator of all things, in his infinite power and wisdom, doth uphold, direct, dispose, and govern all creatures and things, from the greatest even to the least, by His most wise and holy providence, to the end for which they were created, according to his infallible foreknowledge, and the free and immutable counsel of his own will, to the praise of the glory of His wisdom, power, justice, infinite goodness and mercy.

2.    Although in relation to the foreknowledge and decree of God, the first cause, all things come to pass immutably and infallibly, so that there is not anything that befalls any by chance, or without his Providence; yet, by the same Providence he ordereth them to fall out according to the nature of second causes, either necessarily, freely, or contingently.

3.    God in his ordinary providence maketh use of means, yet is free to work without, above, and against them at his pleasure.

4.    The Almighty power, unsearchable wisdom, and infinite goodness of God, so far manifest themselves in His providence, that His determinate counsel extendeth 

itself even to the first fall, and all other sinful actions, both of angels and men, (and that not by a bare permission,) which also He most wisely and powerfully boundeth, and otherwise ordereth, and governeth, in a manifold dispensation to His most holy ends; yet so as the sinfulness of their acts proceedeth only from the creatures, and not from God; who, being most holy and righteous, neither is, nor can be, the author or approver of sin.

5.    The most wise, righteous and gracious God, doth oftentimes leave for a season his own children to manifold temptations, and the corruptions of their own hearts, to chastise them for their former sins, or to discover unto them the hidden strength of corruption and deceitfulness of their hearts, that they may be humbled; and to raise them to a more close and constant dependance for their support upon Himself, and to make them more watchful against all future accessions of sin, and for other just and holy ends. So that whatsoever befalls any of His elect is by His appointment, for His glory, and their good.

6.    As for those wicked and ungodly men, whom God as a righteous judge, for former sin, doth blind and harden, from them He not only withholdeth His grace, whereby they might have been enlightened in their understanding, and wrought upon in their hearts, but sometimes also withdraweth the gifts which they had, and exposeth them to such objects as their corruptions make occasion of sin; and withal, gives them over to their own lusts, and temptations of the world, and the power of Satan, whereby it comes to pass, that they harden themselves, even under those means which God useth for the softening of others.

7. As the Providence of God doth in general reach to all creatures, so after a more special manner it taketh care of his Church, and disposeth all things to the good thereof."

“OF EFFECTUAL CALLING.â€
"1. Those whom God hath predestinated unto life, He is pleased in His appointed and accepted time effectually to call by His word and spirit, out of that state of sin and death, in which they are by nature, to grace of salvation by Jesus Christ; enlightening their minds, spiritually, and savingly, to understand the things of God, taking away their heart of stone, and giving unto them an heart of flesh, renewing their wills, and by His almighty power determining them to that which is good, and effectually drawing them to Jesus Christ; yet so, as they come most freely, being made willing by His grace.

2. This effectual call is of God's free and special grace alone, not from anything at all foreseen in man, nor from any power or agency in the creature, coworking with His special grace, the creature being wholly passive therein, being dead in sins and trespasses, until being quickened and renewed by the Holy Spirit, he is thereby enabled to answer this call, and to embrace the grace offered and conveyed in it, and that by no less power than that which raised up Christ from the dead.

3.    Elect infants dying in infancy, are regenerated and saved by Christ through the Spirit, who worketh when, and where, and how, he pleaseth; so also are all other elect persons, who are incapable of being outwardly called by the ministry of the word.

4.    Others not elected, although they may be called by the ministry of the word, and may have some common operation of the Spirit, yet not being effectually drawn by the Father, they neither will, nor can, truly come to Christ, and therefore cannot be saved; much less can men that receive not the Christian religion, be saved, be they never so diligent to frame their lives according to the light of nature, and the law of that religion they do profess."

"OF GOOD WORKS.â€
"1. Good works are only such as God hath commanded in His holy word, and not such as without the warrant thereof, are devised by men out of blind zeal, or upon any pretence of good intentions.

2. These good works, done in obedience to God's commandments, are the fruits and evidences of a true and lively faith, and by them believers manifest their thankfulness, strengthen their assurance, edify their brethren, adorn the profession of the Gospel, stop the mouths of the adversaries, end glorify God, whose work manship they are, created in Christ Jesus thereunto, that having their fruit unto holiness, they may have the end, eternal life.

3.    Their ability to do good works, is not at all of themselves, but wholly from the spirit of Christ; and that they may be enabled thereunto, besides the graces they have already received, there is necessary an actual influence of the same Holy Spirit to work in them to will and to do of his good pleasure; yet are they not hereupon to grow negligent, as if they were not bound to perform any duty, unless upon a special motion of the spirit, but they ought to be diligent in stirring up the grace of God that is in them.

4.    They who in their obedience attain to the greatest height which is possible in this life, are so far from being able to supererogate, and to do more than God requires, as that they fall short of much which in duty they are bound to do.

5.    We cannot by our best works merit pardon of sin, or eternal life at the hand of God, by reason of the great disproportion that is between them and the glory to come, and the infinite distance that is between us and God, whom by them we can never profit, nor satisfy, for the debt of our former sins; but when we have done all we can, we have but done our duty, and are unprofitable servants; and because as they are good, they proceed from His spirit, and as they are wrought by us, they are defiled, and mixed with so much weakness and imperfection, that they cannot endure the severity of God's judgment.

6.    Yet, notwithstanding the persons of believers being accepted through Christ, their good works also are accepted, not as though they were in this life wholly unblamable and unreprovable in God's sight; but that he, looking upon them in his Son, is pleased to accept and reward that which is sincere, although accompanied with many weaknesses and imperfections.

7.    Works done by unregenerate men, although for the matter of them, they may be things which God commands, and of good use, both to themselves and others; yet because they proceed not from a heart purified by faith, nor are done in a right manner according to the word, nor to a right end—the glory of God—they are sinful and cannot please God, nor make a man meet to receive grace from God; and yet their neglect of them is more sinful and displeasing to God.

"OF THE PERSEVERANCE OF THE SAINTS."
1. "Those whom God hath accepted in the Beloved, effectually called and sanctified by his spirit, and given the precious faith of his elect unto, can neither totally nor finally fall from the state of grace, but shall certainly persevere therein to the end, and be eternally saved, seeing the gifts and callings of God are without repentance, (whence he still begets and nourisheth in them faith, repentance, love, joy, hope, and all the graces of the spirit of immortality,) and though many storms and floods arise and beat against them, yet they shall never be able to take them off that foundation and rock which, by faith, they are fastened upon; notwithstanding, through unbelief and the temptations of Satan, the sensible sight of the light and love of God, may, for a time, be clouded, and obscured from them, yet it is still the same, and they shall be sure to be kept by the power of God unto salvation, where they shall enjoy their purchased possession, they being engraven upon the palm of his hands, and their names having been written in the Book of Life from all eternity.

2.    This perseverance of the saints depends not upon their own free will, but upon the immutability of the decree of election, flowing from the free and unchangeable love of God, the Father, upon the efficacy of the merit and intercession of Jesus Christ and union with him, the oath of God, the abiding of His spirit, and the seed of God within them, and the nature of the covenant of grace; from all which ariseth also the certainty and infallibility thereof.

3.    And though they may, through the temptations of Satan, and of the world, the prevalency of corruption remaining in them, and the neglect of means of their preservation, fall into grievous sins, and for a time continue therein, whereby they incur God's displeasure, and grieve His Holy Spirit, come to have their graces and comforts impaired, have their hearts hardened, and their consciences wounded, hurt and scandalize others, and bring temporal judgments upon themselves, yet they shall renew their repentance, and be preserved, through faith in Christ Jesus, to the end."

The foregoing is deemed amply sufficient to portray the distinguishing features in the articles of faith, of the Particular Baptists of that day. Nevertheless, as the new idea of a general atonement and special application, was introduced, in the succeeding century, by Mr. Andrew Fuller, the attention of the reader is called to one section of chapter 8, on the mediation of Christ, viz: "The Lord Jesus, by his perfect obedience and sacrifice of himself, which He, through the eternal spirit, once offered up unto God, hath fully satisfied the justice of God, procured reconciliation, and purchased an everlasting inheritance in the Kingdom of Heaven, for all those whom the Father hath given unto him."

GR004 FULLER'S VIEW OF THE ATONEMENT CHAPTER IV

FULLER'S VIEW OF THE ATONEMENT.
In 1768 there were in England, including Wales, two hundred and thirtyeight Particular Baptist churches, twenty of which were located in London. Soon after this, Mr. Fuller, a Particular Baptist preacher, introduced his new doctrine on the atonement. It is here frankly admitted, that as a polemical writer, Mr. Fuller has had few equals in strength of mind, and depth and originality of thought; but his ingenuity of arrangement, in opposing the doctrine of special atonement, by introducing principles inconsistent with it, instead of a direct opposition, in common with the Arminian, evinces an evil design, or a palpable delusion. If the former, then how are we to account for his able defence of many glorious truths? But if the latter, then it illustrates a great truth, that zeal, erudition and power of intellect are no security against error.

It is no part of our purpose to sift the abstruse disquisitions of Mr. Fuller on this subject. There may not, however, be any impropriety in stating a few of his bold assertions, and leave the reader to draw his own inferences, viz: "Both guilt and innocence are transferable in their effects, but in themselves they are untransferable.' '"Neither sin nor righteousness are in themselves transferable, "Debts are transferable, but crimes are not. A third person may cancel the one, but he can only obliterate the effects of the other. The desert of the criminal remains."

A few quotations from the Bible, by way of contrast, and the subject will be dismissed: Typical—"And when He hath made an end of reconciling the holy place, and the tabernacle of the congregation, and the altar, he shall bring the live goat, and Aaron shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live goat and confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat, and shall send him away by the hand of a fit man into the wilderness. And the goat shall bear upon him all their iniquities into a land not inhabited; and he shall let go the goat into the wilderness."

Here we have a real transfer of sin, transgression, and iniquity—and that too of the Israelites, a peculiar people. Prophetical—"By his Knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities." Isaiah liii and ii. Here is another clear case of transfer. Declarative—"For he hath made him (Christ) to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him." 2Co 5:21. Again, "Who his own self bear our sins in his own body on the tree, that we being dead to sins should live unto righteousness." 1Pe 2:24. Many more quotations might be given, of the same import, showing clearly that Christ did bear the sins of his people, as well as the effects.

Our object in calling Mr. Fuller's doctrine on the atonement a new idea was to distinguish it from that for which the Arminians contend. For when his arguments are critically examined, it will be found that he contends for an indefinite atonement. But his disquisitions on this subject are so refined and obscure, that most of his followers suppose him in favor of a general atonement—while those who do understand him, can occupy a position between the Arminian and Predestinarian, and cozen the former on the atonement, and the latter on the application.

We will now leave Mr. Fuller's theory, and examine his practice—like faith, like works—like always begetting its like. And this will require.

GR005 A CHAPTER ON MODERN MISSIONS CHAPTER V

A CHAPTER ON MODERN MISSIONS.
The paternity of the Missionary System among the Baptists is claimed for Mr. Fuller, by his biographer. His new doctrine on the Atonement, as might be expected, caused great distress and controversy in the churches. And in order to give the reader a hint, respecting his state of mind, and his standing among his brethren, previous to his begetting this thing, a few quotations from his diary, as reported by his biographer, will be sufficient:

1781, April 1st.—"It seems as if the church and I should break each other's hearts! To night I have been but truly charged with having 'an irregular mind.' How heartily could I embrace death, if it pleased God to send it! How far are peace and happiness from me!" 1785, Nov. 21st.— 'Much grieved to find the spirits of people about the neighborhood of Ghurt by controversy. I find there are several whose conversation almost entirely, and on all occasions, turns on these subjects. It seems to be one of Satan's devices, in order to destroy the good tendency of any truth, to get its advocates to hackney it out of its senses, dwelling upon it in every sermon or conversation, to the exclusion of other things. Thus the glorious doctrines of free and great grace have been served in the last age, and so have fallen sadly into disrepute. If we employ all our time in talking about what men ought to be and to do, it is likely we shall forget to put it into practice, and then all is over with us."

The reader, if his heart has been circumcised, his ears unstopped, and his eyes opened by "free and great grace," is now fully prepared to admit that Mr. Fuller was, on the 21st November, 1785, qualified to be the father of some new invention. And accordingly, about this time, we are informed by his biographer, the "germ of this Missionary institution" began to exist. But it was seven years afterwards that it began to bear tangible fruit.

The following extracts from the memoirs of Mr. Fuller, will show his relationship:   

"In conjunction with a few individuals who had united with him in strenuous efforts to induce compassion on behalf of the heathen world, Mr. Fuller was, in the midst of his afflictions, occupied in maturing plans which issued in the formation of the Particular Baptist Society for propagating the Gospel among the heathen. A meeting was convened for that purpose at Kettering, on the 2nd of October, 1752, on which occasion the contributions amounted to £13 2s., 6d., which then constituted the whole of its pecuniary resources."

In a letter to Dr. Ryland, Mr. Fuller says, (as reported by his biographer): "You see things of great consequence are in train. My heart fears while it is enlarged. I have this day been to Olney to converse with brother Sutcliff, and to request him to go with me to Leicester this day se'nnight, to conciliate the church there, and to sound Mrs. Cary's mind, whether she will go and take the family" (to the East Indies.)

1794, Oct. 27—(From his diary again.): "Of late I have been greatly employed in journeying and preaching, and endeavoring to collect for the East India Mission. I find a frequent removal from place to place, though good for my health, not good for my soul."

"There was (says the biographer) at that time little or no precedent for the management of the affairs of such institutions, nor had Mr. Fuller any predilection for that business— like apparatus which the more extended concerns of the society at length imperatively demanded, and for the want of which they suffered during the latter part of his life. Besides his utter repugnance to that parade which has in too many instances been made an appendage to the business of religious institutions, he entertained serious objections of another kind. 'Friends,' said he, 'talk to me about coadjutors and assistants, but I know not how it is, I find a difficulty. Our undertaking to India really appeared to me, on its commencement, to be somewhat like a few men, who were deliberating about the importance of penetrating into a deep mine, which had never before been explored. We had no one to guide us; and, while we were thus deliberating, Cary, as it were, said, 'Well, I will go down, if you will hold the rope!' But, before he went down, he, as it seemed to me, took an oath from each of us at the mouth of the pit to this effect, that while we lived, we should never let go the rope. You understand me. There was great responsibility attached to us who began the business."

In this last sentence, Mr. Fuller has no doubt uttered a profound truth. "Who hath required this missionary system at their hands?" Is such a system set forth by precept or example in the revelation of God to man?

If not, as we boldly assert, how dare they practice such a system in His name—professing at the same time to take His revealed word as their only rule of faith and practice.

Be this system what it may, and founded on what authority it may, it is uncontrovertibly true, that Mr. Fuller, "in conjunction with a few individuals," did mature the plan, which, in 1792, "issued in the formation of the Particular Baptist Missionary Society." And those who deny this fact, as a mere matter of policy, are attempting to rob Mr. Fuller of the honor justly due him, and give it to the Apostles, who would not accept it were they present.

Mr. Fuller, under a deep sense of the responsibility of the undertaking, expresses himself, in a letter to Dr. Ryland, thus: "You see things of great consequence are in train. My heart fears while it is enlarged." He viewed the matter "somewhat like a few men, who were deliberating about the importance of penetrating into a deep mine, which had never before been explored." "We had no one guide us," says Mr. Fuller, "and while we were deliberating, Cary, as it were, said, 'well, I will go down if you will hold the rope"'!!!

One more quotation from Mr. Fuller's biography, and we will pass on. In reply to an editor he says:

"As to magazines, there are several to which I contribute, for the sake of the Mission and other public interests, and, through such a number of objects as press upon me daily, my own vineyard, my own soul, my family and congregation, are neglected."

Our limits will not permit further quotations.

Before crossing the Atlantic in search of Missionary operations in our own beloved country, it would perhaps be well to notice the leading text, on which the New School Baptists rely, in support of their missionary system, viz: "Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature." This command was given to the Apostles, and not to the elders of the churches. They are two distinct sets of officers, the former were ordained by our Saviour personally, the latter by the Holy Ghost, instrumentally.

That there is some difference of opinion, among orthodox Baptists, relative to the obligation of this command, is readily conceded. Nevertheless, were it not for traditionary notions on this subject, and were the mind strictly confined to the revealed word alone, the difference would no doubt vanish into nothing. At all events, the Apostles did fulfill the command, and whether it will ever again be fulfilled, or not, let those who believe it, show their authority.

"Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.—Mr 16:15.

"If you continue in the faith, grounded and settled, and be not moved away from the hope of the gospel, which ye have heard, and which was preached to every creature which was under heaven." —Col 1:23.

"But I say, have they not heard? Yes, verily, their sound went into all the earth, and their words unto the ends of the world."—Ro 10:18.

Without involving ourselves in the controversy about the extent of the world here meant, it is sufficient for our purpose to prove that the fulfillment of the conmmand is asserted by equal authority and of equal length and breadth.

It is well known to all those concerned, that scripture language often has a special and general meaning. As a general rule there is no objection raised. But as to the specialty of the command, in the sense in which it was given to the Apostles, to go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature, it never was required at the hands of the churches, nor the elders of the churches.

In conclusion of this part of the subject, we will quote from the circular letter of the Primitive Baptist Association, published in 1847, viz: "The elders wre ordained as overseers of the churches. And Paul says to the elders, 'I have not shunned to declare unto you all the council of God. Take heed therefore unto yourselves and to all the flock, over which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood,' Peter, also, in his first letter, exhorts the elders to 'feed the flock of God which is among you, taking the oversight thereof, not by constraint, but willingly; not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mind. Neither as being lords over God's heritage, but being examples to the flock.' Not one word from either of these inspired writers, about the command laid upon the Apostles, and which the Apostles fulfilled. Neither can it be found in all the apostolic writings addressed to the churches. Paul tells Titus that a Bishop must 'Hold fast the faithful word, as he hath been taught, that he may be able, by sound doctrine, both to exhort and to convince the gainsayers. For there are many unruly and vain talkers and deceivers, especially they of the circumcision. Whose mouths must be stopt, who subvert whole houses, teaching things which they ought not, for filthy lucre's sake. 'They profess that they know God, but in works they deny him.' Though an Apostle might officiate as an elder, we have no authority for supposing, that an elder may officiate as an Apostle. The Apostles were commanded to work miracles, but the elders were not.

"Some contend that the command to go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature, was given to the Apostles in a church capacity, and equally binding with the sacrament of the Lord's supper. But we see many palpable objections to such a conclusion. And 1st, we have no testimony of any organized Gospel church before the day of Pentecost. And 2nd, supposing the Apostles organized into a church, at the time they received the command to 'go into all the world and preach the gospel,' and by analogy made binding on all church members, then, according to this hypothesis, all should go, men and women; or, do what is less possible, show gospel authority for sending substitutes. Again: The Comforter, who was to lead Christ's people into all truth, directed the supper to be administered to the members of organized churches— but in all the letters to the churches, they are no where commanded to 'Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.' Neither was this undertaken, or practised by the Church at Jerusalem, or any other of the gospel churches, so far as we know from Divine truth."

None were ever specially engaged under this command, except the Apostles; and they, not as a Church nor Missionary Society; but as extraordinary Ministers, who "conferred not with flesh and blood," and were responsible to none but their Master.

We would now ask every intelligent Christian, whether the gospel was sent to the heathen land of America by a Missionary Society, or the providence of God? The truth is. that the Holy Ghost, it seems, has never adopted any other mode than persecution in some shape for sending the gospel from one country to another. This was commenced at Jerusalem, and has been continued ever since. "Wo unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but wo to that man by whom the offence cometh."

Dr. Judson is set up, by his friends, as the father of American missions. But the reader should understand this in a qualified sense. Mr. Fuller is the father of modern missions; and the American missions are fashioned after the English model. Therefore, to speak of sectional missions, would seem to be invidious distinctions, wholly unjustifiable—for they are all governed by the same spirit.

In 1812, Dr. Judson left America, a Congregational Missionary, and proceeded to Rangoon, in Burmah, and commenced operations. The next year "he was adopted by a society formed among the Baptists of this country." "In that year American Christians pledged themselves to the work of evangelizing the world. They had but little to rest on except the command and promise of God. The attempts then made by British Christians had not been attended with so much success as to establish the practicability, or vindicate the wisdom of the missionary enterprise. For many years the work advanced, but slowly. One denomination after another embarked in the undertaking—and now American Missionaries are seen in almost every clime."

The above is from the address of Dr. Judson, delivered, or read, in Baldwin Place, Boston, in June, 1846, and of course will be received as apostolic authority, at least by the Missionaries. He calls it a missionary enterprise, and though it had then been in operation about twenty years, yet, its practicability had not been established, or its wisdom vindicated.

We take the following from the address of the President of the Foreign Mission Board to Dr. Judson, at Richmond, Virginia:

"When you and your honored associates, Nott, Mills, and Newell, presented to the General Association of Congregationalisms, in Massachusetts, assembled in Bradford, in 1810, a paper expressing your desire to engage in the work of Foreign Missions, and asking their advice and aid, who could have anticipated the result of the application! At that time the churches were slumbering profoundly on the subject of Missions—there were no Missionary Societies—no plans matured for conducting Missions— and no funds collected for the support of Missionaries.

"The application originated the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. A noble institution it is, superior to any in our own land, and vieing in the wisdom of its measures, and the success of its efforts, with the best ordered and most renowned Missionary organizations of the old world. Its annual expenditures is not far, if at all, short of one third of a million of dollars; and its Mission stations have dotted almost the whole extent of heathendom.

"Under the patronage of this Board, after considerable hesitation and delay on their part, you embarked, with your companion, and several associates, in 1812, for the East. On your arrival there, an event occurred deeply affecting your own course, and the cause of Missions. You, Mrs. Judson, and the lamented Rice, became Baptists. The hand of God was in it. The change was the means of arousing, among the Baptists of the United States, the Missionary spirit, and forming the Baptist Triennial Convention, under whose patronage you have so long labored.

****** "The success of the Missionary enterprise has every where corresponded, in a remarkable manner, with the measure of ability, zeal and diligence employed in its prosecution. We base our expectations on the increasing prevalence of the Missionary spirit. When more than half a century ago, the work of Foreign Missions commenced (at Kettering,) among the Anglo— Saxon Christians, led on by the immortal Cary, it was predicted that its advocates would soon grow weary; and relax their efforts. The prediction has not been fulfilled. At no previous period has it been so much the settled policy and purpose of the churches to make efforts and sacrifices in the work of evangelizing the world, as it is now. *****

"Henceforth, my brother, you and we shall labor in connection with different Boards. Events which neither you nor we could control, produced the separation. * * * * We honor you as the father of American Missions."

In the foregoing the reader will readily see, that in his eagerness to honor Dr. Judson, the President has admitted modern Missionism to be a new thing among the Baptists. And yet in the face of this, and the truth of history, the New School Baptists will contend, that it has been practiced ever since the days of the Apostles.

For the purpose of showing the estimation in which modern Missionism was held in America in days gone by, we extract the following from an address of Dr. Judson, at Utica, New York, viz:

"Thirty— three years ago he took passage with an associate missionary in a ship bound for India. No ministering brother, and but a few Christian friends, dared risk their reputation so much as to accompany them to the ship. No prayers were offered on the occasion, no affectionate farewells. They went down to the ship alone, crept into the cabin, and committed themselves to the deep. Now, how changed!!!"

So do we say "how changed!" And all the Old School Baptists throughout the United States say "how changed!" But the most astonishing thing of all is, that when Dr. Judson says "how changed!" the New School Baptists are ready to throw up their hats—and when we say the same thing, they, with a contemptuous scowl upon their faces, will affirm that modern Missionism is regular Baptist usage, and has been practiced ever since the days of the Apostles.

GR006 MISSIONISM AMONG THE HINDOS CHAPTER VI

MISSIONISM AMONG THE HINDOS

We take the following from the Macedonian, a New School Baptist paper, published in Cincinnati, Ohio, which will give the reader some idea of the state of affairs in a country where modern Missionism has been at work ever since Cary was sent out by the "Particular Baptist Society for propagating the Gospel among the heathen." The reader will recollect that this society was formed at Kettering, in Great Britain, in 1792, by Rev. Andrew Fuller, and his associates. And as Dr. Judson has been rather significantly called, by his friends, the father of American Missions, we are impelled by the truth of history to admit, that Mr. Fuller is the great father of Modern Missions, which is the same thing everywhere.

We now proceed to give the extract alluded to, which is a letter written at Balasore, June 26th, 1845, by O. R. Bachelor, viz:

"The prospect of affairs in India has recently assumed a new and interesting aspect. Great excitement has prevailed of late in the native society at Calcutta and vicinity, in relation to Missionaries and Missionary operations. The native press has been actively engaged, and large assemblies hve been held, with the design to get up an influence which shall compel their countrymen to withhold all support and encouragement from the propagators of Christianity, and thereby compel them to leave the country.

"The immediate cause of this new movement is briefly this: The mission of the church has for several years had in successful operation a large and flourishing school, which has afforded constant instruction to nearly one thousand heathen youth in English literature and science. But the conductors of this institution were not merely teachers of literature. While the heathen mind, bound in chains for ages, was expanding under the influence of European science, they endeavored to store it with the principles of Gospel truth. Christian theology occupied a prominent place in their instructions.

"The consequence was, that so long as no converts were made, the native community were not only quiet, but loud in their praises of the Missionaries. Important changes have recently taken place. The seed, so long sown in sorrow and in tears, has at length begun to germinate. Several of the young men in the institution, some of them belonging to wealthy and influential families, have one by one embraced Christianity. Every successive conversion has given rise to increased excitement, until lately, cases of apostacy from Hindooism have become so frequent, that the whole community has become aroused—I might almost say enraged—and the spirit of enmity to the Gospel, like the eruption of a volcano, long pent up and confined, has burst forth in all its vindictive malignity and virulence. A large assembly of native gentlemen, was called to adopt measures for counteracting the influence of the Missionaries. Many flaming speeches were made, characterized by enmity, misrepresentation and abuse; and a plan was finally adopted to raise three hundred thousand rupees, nearly one hundred and fifty thousand doll?rs for the endowment of an English free school, capable of affording instruction to one thousand young men. But some extracts from the native papers will best show the state of public feeling on the subject. The following extract is from the Prabakar, a Bengali newspaper, of May 16, 1845, viz: The son of the brother of an acquaintance of ours, like a bird from its cage, having escaped with extended wings in company with his wife from his home, has fallen into the hands of a certain fowler in Calcutta. On this our friend with some of his relatives, by spreading the net of habeas corpus, endeavored to rescue the silly little bird from the clutches of the fowler. But the fowler—the white incarnation—seeing this, said to our friends: All your efforts are vain, for the little bird has come to my house, and I shall endeavor to keep it. I cram it daily with knowledge from my own bill; it has already learned to chirp a few pretty notes, so that it will no more relish your attentions. After saying this, he dismissed our friends, without even allowing them a sight of the boy. Alas! we fear that God has made the hearts of the white faced ascetics of the hardest stone.

"We fear the Missionary more than we do the serpent by whose poisonous bite life is so much in danger; for the evil effects arising from the serpent's bite may be removed by the application of medicine, but there is no remedy from the sting of the serpent— like white— faced missionary. The tiger is a fearful and powerful animal, but he can be overcome by sticks and other weapons, but God himself is scarce able to punish these wolves that roam the forest wilds.

"The sword is a terrible weapon, for by its stroke alone the body can be cut into pieces, and the soul freed from the body escapes to the shades of death; but the ravages of the sword may be stayed in a variety of ways, but the sword— like words which proceed from the blood— red mouths of the white— faced teachers, how sharp are they! If they but strike one. even in secret, they tear to pieces his own soul and the hearts of all his friends.

"Disease is a terrible enemy, but physicians have discovered many remedies by which the most fatal diseases which affect the body and cause death, may be overcome; but when exposed to the pestilential atmosphere of the Missionary's influence, a youth is effected by the fatal disease of Christianity, he is irretrievably lost; for this disease there is no cure, no remedy.

"Death is very terrific, for by its very mention the soul is almost driven out of the body, and when once gone there is no hope of recovering life; still we do not fear death so much as the influence of the Missionaries; for death ofttimes performs the office of a friend, when we are oppressed with sorrow, disease and poverty, and are not able to bear up with the ills of life; when we remember that one's death is as certain as one's birth, the sorrow occasioned by death is removed. But alas! alas! if a person becomes a Christian, he and his family are utterly ruined. There is no disgrace in death, but when one's son becomes a Christian, the disgrace entailed on a family is beyond calculation. Wherefore, on account of the reasons already mentioned, we infinitely more dread the influence of the Missionaries, than the attack of all the enemies we have already named.' "

The reader should bear in mind, that this extract from a Bengali newspaper was selected by the friends of missions as best suited to answer their purpose. And, having no means of information on this subject, from that distant land, except through the Missionaries, the best that we can do is to analyze their own showing.

This Hindoo writer evinces no favoritism for any religion, but does manifest a strong prejudice against Christianity. But we are not prepared to decide this matter fairly, without first knowing the fruits of Christianity, as manifested by its representatives in that country. For by their fruit they are to be known—and if that be evil, then Christ himself will condemn such Christianity.

All the cool, calculating opposition to Jesus Christ and His Apostles, mainly eminated from the pretended worshippers of the true God. The opposition to Christianity, by the heathen, was usually through temporary excitement. A mob was raised at Macedonia and Ephesus, and other places, through the chicanery of interested priests. But this was by no means a settled design of the people. When Paul disputed with the philosophers at Athens, some called him a babbler—— some said he set forth strange gods —some that he brought strange things to their ears—and some would like to hear him again on the subject; but no spiteful opposition.

Reader, suppose that a Hindoo priest was to settle, with a company of associates, in our country, to decoy young people into their possession—keep them confined in secrecy from their friends—and then set the laws of the land at defiance, looking to the British flag for protection —what would be the result? Have not Catholic nunneries been destroyed in this country for similar offences while looking to our own flag for protection?

Let us now examine the admissions of the Balasore letter. The writer admits, that so long as no converts were made—that is, so long as the schools were not sectarian— "the native community were not only quiet, but loud in their praises of the Missionaries." But as soon as they began to stuff school theology down the children's throats, great excitement followed. These Hindoos were not opposed to an English education; but on the contrary made arrangements to raise about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars for the endowment of an English free school —free from sectarianism—free from school theology.

Before leaving this subject we feel constrained to show that these unfortunate Hindoos are not all that oppose such Christianity as they have to deal with. The following is from the Portland Boat, published in Maine, viz:

"Pius Deviltry.—It appears from recent acts of the ungodly in this city, that the tide of pious blasphemy and mockery is rapidly approaching its utmost limits; the last swell or "roller" has gone much higher than anything ever witnessed here before. The ungodly have been building what they blasphemously call a church edifice, whose weather— cock is to outtop everything in the city; and it appears from recent occurrences, that the rowdyism of its owners has exceeded that of their neighbors, in proportion to the height of their weathercocks.

A fair, or as they call it, a bazaar, was held last week to make money, as I am told, for carpeting, cushioning, ornamenting, &c, this heathen pagoda. The following notice which appeared in the daily papers will give the reader some faint idea of the blasphemous scene. Let the reader observe how much of it sounds like the doctrines and doings of Jesus Christ:

" 'Notice— —Bazaar at Lancaster Hall.—The above new and spacious hall, will be opened for the second time, on Monday evening next, and continue until Wednesday evening; on which occasion the ladies, on behalf of the New Church, on State street, will offer a great variety of useful articles for sale. Among the attractions may be found the 'Phrenological Old Gentleman,' a paper printed expressly for the occasion, containing original pieces from some of the most celebrated authors of the country; a Post— Office; a Valentine Department; but more particularly a Department of the Interior. Door open at 7 o'clock, Monday evening. Admittance 12 cents.' "

"I have now before me one of the papers 'printed expressly for the occasion, and had some rowdy opened a grog shop and eating rooms, he could scarcely have published a more rowdyish thing than are most of its contents.

"The above advertisement speaks of the 'Department of the Interior,' and the following from the same paper tells us something about the contents of that Department:

" 'The Department of the Interior, abounds in the most delicious refreshments. The luxuries and substantial of our own and other lands appear there in rich profusion— coffee and lemons of the choicest flavor, ice creams, oranges, sponge and loaf cake, elegant puffs and tarts, tongues, hams, chicken salad, oysters, sardines, fig paste, Guava jelly, prunes, candies, golden tipped cigars of the nicest brands, and also magnificent loaves of Fruit Cake with gold rings in them. Every article will be sold on the most favorable terms, for cash. Supplies abundant. No one need fear exhaustion, so long as his purse holds out. Walk up.'"

"Is it not horrible that in a city like this, a temperate moral man cannot send his children into the street without exposing them to the continual danger of being drawn aside by flaming church advertisements and pious handbills, and robbed of money and morals, and initiated into vices in the name of Jesus Christ! Is it not horrible! And men who once possessed a tolerable share of common sense, and who have seen enough of the world to know the withering, cursing effects of vice, helping the priests on with their infernal craft—teaching children vice and dissipation in the name of the Holy One, just for the purpose of filching from them their few coppers.

"Cakes with gold rings in them! One ring in a cake, the cake cut into twenty slices, and each slice sold for one— fourth as much as the ring cost! A gamblers cake sugared all over to tempt the depraved appetite, and teach children to gamble for rings! And Mrs. L. H. S., Miss H. F. G., and John N., prostituting their pens and powers by contributing articles to the occasional paper, that helps on this deviltry! Strengthening the hands of the gamblers, with their pious strains!

"Magnificent loaves of fruit cake, with gold rings in them! Just as much like the barley loaves of Christ, as the religion of these blasphemers is like the religion of Christ! I will now close, for it would be impossible to do full justice to this subject. It is horrible to witness the rapid stride, that the rising generation, especially in cities, are making in vice and immorality—everything evil; and when we reflect, that false churches, with their priests, are the fountains of these increasing evils—that they are initiating children in the school of vice, that too, in the winning name of Christ, language fails to express our horror. Is it not time that these infernal engines of evil, called churches, who are guilty of such acts as are sketched above, were despised and hated by all honest people?"

Now, gentle reader, you have seen that an American editor denounces the acts of these people in terms as strong as the Hindoo editor. We ask you, in all candor, if these people will do such things in our presence, what may we expect when they are hid behind the globe, in a far distant land? Is it any wonder that an honest, moral and intelligent Hindoo should despise such Christianity? Yea, has not Christ and his inspired Apostles denounced such Christianity, in stronger terms than either of the foregoing editors?

GR007 MISSIONISM IN AFRICA CHAPTER VII

MISSIONISM IN AFRICA

The following was taken from the Universe, and published in the "Signs of the Times," from which we have obtained it. It speaks for itself:

"The Missionary Enterprise at Home and Abroad.—

Missionaries, notwithstanding they profess to be elevated above ordinary men in their motives and desires, and to be actuated in their efforts for the conversion of the world, by the most disinterested love to God and their fellowmen, are nevertheless men subject to like passions as the generality of mankind are, have similar natural propensities and designs, love the good things of this world, and consider themselves perfectly justified in doing all they can to secure the confidence, esteem and support of the religious public, in order to be comfortably provided for in their efforts for the propagation of their faith. They, therefore, in their public reports, invariably labor to make the most favorable impression upon the public mind with reference to the results of the so— called momentous undertaking in which they are engaged; not omitting in the accounts they give to the progress of the good work, the most trivial affair which they think they may in any way construe, whether justly or erroneously, as being in the least degree indicative of the advancement of their cause. Nor do some of these good and holy men hesitate, when they think it is necessary for the good of the cause, that they should do so, to make statements in their reports which are utterly false.

"An English gentleman, now residing in our city, and connected with one of the most respectable commercial houses down town, and who, previous to his coming to this country, spent several years in Sierra Leone, having been appointed, by the British goverment, manager of the liberated African Department in that country, gave us the following account of Missionary proceedings there, as witnessed by himself. We give it publicity by that gentleman's permission, who, being himself a Christian and a lover of truth, is by no means desirous to keep back the truth from his fellow— men, lest it should give offense to the friends of the Missionary cause.

"A missionary situated on the Island of St. Mary, under the care of the Church Missionary Society, sent home his annual report to the Board in London. The report was published in the Society's Missionary Magazine, and was of course circulated through the British empire and other parts of the world, and was universally read by the friends and supporters of the Church Missionary Society. A few copies reached the missionary stations in Sierra Leone, and one of these fell into the hands of the Manager of the Liberated African Department. He opened and read the report sent home by the Missionary on the Island of St. Mary, in whose neighborhood he happened to be at the time. The report gave a most glowing account of a great religious excitement then felt in that place; and among other things it stated, that the chapel was constantly crowded with hearers, who manifested a deep feeling while listening to the word preached. It stated also that the neighboring country, separated from his station by a river, was inhabited by a race of people who were of the Mahomedan faith; that this people gave the most encouraging indications of their preparedness for the reception of the Gospel, and that even their priests flocked over in crowds—hundreds of them having visited him, wading through the water for that purpose, spending day after day with him in religious conversation, and reading with the most profound interest an Arabic bible which he had in his possession.

"Amazed at the contents of the report, he showed it to another gentleman, a resident of the place, and fully conversant with all missionary proceedings there, and asked him if he could say what it meant. The gentleman, on reading it, was not less amazed than himself—the whole report covering the awakening, and the interest felt by the Mahomedan tribes, and their priests, being a mere fabrication of the Missionary's brain, without one word of truth in it. The two gentlemen, however, called upon the Missionary, and showing him the article, to which his name was affixed, asked him if that had been written by him? His answer was in the affirmative. He was then asked, 'What do you mean by these statements? Where are those Mahomedans you speak of? When were they here? Who has seen any of them or their people with you! ! !' He replied, 'Gentlemen, other Missionaries send home good reports of their doings, and of the success which attends their labor; and if I do not the same. I shall not be able to retain a situation here.

"Be it remembered that this account we have received from the gentleman himself, who, with the Missionary's report in his hand, questioned him upon the subject, and received his answer—a gentleman of unquestionable veracity, and whose statements may be fully relied on. Missionaries, doubtless, are anxious to do all the good they can, by their public ministry, to the people among whom they labor—or at least they are very desirous to have large congregations to hear them when they preach —and if the people will not voluntarily attend when they are requested to do so, they think it perfectly right to drive them, contrary to their inclination, to the sanctuary of God, that thereby they might be saved.

"Mr. P, manager of the Liberated African Department in Sierra Leone, informed us, that shortly after his arrival in that country, being then in a town called Regent, he went out one morning and saw the colored police about the streets, collecting the people together, and driving them with whips. He went up to them and asked what they were about? They said that they were taking the people to meeting. He asked them by whose authority they were doing so. They said that they were ordered to do so by the Missionary. He replied: 'You go and tell the Missionary that I forbid you doing so any more'— and the converted Africans were released from the power of the police, and were permitted to go where their inclinations led them, or their business called them. Shortly afterwards the Missionary called on him, and asked him why he prevented the police taking the people to meeting. He replied: 'I have no objections for these people to go and hear you, if they are so inclined; but I will not allow them to be driven with whips to church against their own will, when their business might call them elsewhere.' The Missionary answered: 'It is the only way we can get them there, and if we do not use such means they will not attend.' After some further remarks by each of the parties, the Missionary continued: 'My predecessor, Mr. Johnson, used to report to the Board, that his chapel was crowded with people, to attend public prayer, every morning and evening in the week; and I understand that he employed the police to bring them together, as long as he was here, and therefore always secured a full attendance. The Board will expect the same report from me; and I see no reason why I should not be allowed to use the same means as he employed to bring the congregation together.

"The mission in Sierra Leone is represented in the annual report of the Society as being in a most flourishing state; the preaching of the Missionaries having produced the most wonderful effects in the conversion and elevation of that once degraded people. Wonderful indeed is the change wrought among them! ! How elevated must be their state, how thorough and perfectly satisfactory their conversion, and how intense the interest they feel for the truths of the Gospel, which the zealous and selfdenying Missionary preaches to them, when that Missionary is under the necessity of sending round his police to drive them with whips to meeting, before they can be induced to come and hear him preach, and unite with him, as their beloved pastor, in public worship! ! !

"But to employ whippers— in to drive the converted heathen to the sanctuary of God, thereby to secure large congregations of attentive and interested hearers, listening with deep emotion to the preaching of the Gospel, is not peculiar to the Missionaries on the African coast; the practice is common in other parts of the world, when it is in the Missionary's power to exercise such authority. Herman Melville, in his Narrative of Adventures in the South Sea, makes mention of a similar class of people in the employment of the Missionaries in Polynesia. He speaks upon the subject as follows:

" 'The hypocrisy in matters of religion, so apparent in all Polynesian converts, is most injudiciously nourished in Tahiti, by a zealous, and in many cases, a coercive superintendence over their spiritual well— being. But this coercive superintendence is only manifested with re— pect to the common people, their superiors being exempt from it. On Sunday morning when the prospect is rather small for a full house in the minor or inferior churches, a parcel of fellows are actually sent out with rattans into the highways and by— ways, as whippers— in of the congregation. This is a sober fact. With abhorrence and disgust the custom is alluded to by a late benevolent visitor at the island. See page 763 of the Memoirs of the Life and Gospel Labors of the late Daniel Wheeler. These worthies constitute a religious police; and you always know them by the great white diapers they wear. On week days they are quite as busy as on Sundays, to the great terror of the inhabitants, going all over the island, and spying out the wickedness thereof. Moreover, they are the collectors of fines—levied generally in grassmats—for obstinate non— attendance upon Divine worship, and other offences amenable to the ecclesiastical judicature of the Missionaries. These fellows are called 'Kinnahippers.'

" 'The Kinnahippers are hated by the islanders, and especially by the ladies. And no wonder; the impertinent varlets, popping into their houses at all hours, are forever prying into their pecadilloes. Mr. Roloo, who at times was patriotic and pensive, and mourned the evils under which his country was groaning, frequently inveighed against the statute, which thus authorized an utter stranger (the Missionary,) to interfere with domestic arrangements. He himself — quite a ladies' man — had often been annoyed thereby. He considered the Kinnahippers a bore. Besides their confounded inquisitiveness, they add insult to injury, by making a point of dining out every day at some hut within the limits of their jurisdiction. As for the gentleman of the house, his meek endurance of these things is amazing. But 'good, easy man,' there is nothing for him but to be as hospitable as possible. These gentry are indefatigable. At the dead of night prowling round the houses—and in the day— time hunting amorous couples in groves. Often when seated in a house, conversing quietly with its inmates, I have known the family betray the greatest confusion at the sudden announcement of a Kinnahipper's being in sight. To be reported by one of these officials as a 'Tootai Owre,' signifying a bad person or disbeliever in Christianity, is as much dreaded as the forefinger of Titus Oates was, levelled at an alleged papist.

" 'But the islanders take a sly revenge upon them. Old Bob, one day drawing near home, and learning that two of them were just then making a domiciliary visit at his house, ran behind a bush, and as they came forth, two green bread fruits, from a hand unseen, took them each between the shoulders. The sailors in the calabaza were witnesses to this, as well as several natives, who, when the intruders were out of sight, applauded captain Bob's spirit in no measured terms—the ladies present vehemently joining in. Upon entering a dwelling the Kinnahippers oftentimes volunteered a pharasaical prayer meeting; hence, they go in secret by the name of 'Boora Artuas,' signifying 'Pray— to— Gods.'"

DEAN'S ILLUSTRATION

We have now given as much relative to the Missionary effort in Asia and Africa, as our limits will permit. We will, however, give an extract from the "Address of Rev. Mr. Dean, at the Brooklyn Anniversary," showing the great importance of a continuous effort, and the awful consequence of an abatement, viz:

"Let us suppose, my friends, that you had sent one of your children down into a deep well to gather diamonds. Suppose you had prepared all the machinery and materials, and that you had sent one down into the deep and dismal place, to collect, amid the damps of that dangerous pit, ornaments, with which to deck an honored guest. You have prepared the rope and let him gently down; his efforts have been successful, he had collected a rich treasure from among the filth and rubbish of the place, and now you begin to draw him up laden with gems which shall sparkle in beauty on the honored brow.

"And, after you began to draw him up, you become tired or discouraged, and let him fall suddenly to the bottom, and all the rich load is scattered and lost! Your Missionaries, my friends, have been gathering with great toil, amid the deadly damps of the pit of heathenism, diamonds which are to glitter in your Saviour's crown to all eternity, and will you let go the rope? Will you suffer the precious treasure to be lost?"

Rev. Mr. Dean is a missionary to Asia, and highly skilled in missionary theology and practice. His views are ably and forcibly illustrated; and if his figure of illustration is to be understood to the full extent, it is clearly shown by analogy, that the Missionaries themselves as well as the heathen, are in great danger, should their friends in the United States let go the rope.

Mr. Dean, towards the close of his Address, says, "I expect soon to go again down into the pit, to gather diamonds," relying of course on his friends here to hold the rope. This whole figure, used here by Rev. Mr. Dean is quite orthodox, having been borrowed from Rev. Mr. Fuller, the great head of modern missions. And should it have the desired effect in stimulating the friends of mission to distil showers of money upon those who labor in the pit, with the liberal use of the rattan, they will, no doubt, work wonders in the name of Jesus— and at least equal the Jews, Pilate and the Roman soldiers, in decking His head with a glittering crown.

We must pass Europe for the following very obvious reason, given by Rev. Dr. Judson, in an address, which, he being unable to speak, was read to the audience by the Rev. Baron Stow:

"The greatest popular objection to the missionary enterprise is drawn from the small success which has attended missionary effort among the great nations of the earth. Some progress has been made, in converting the ruder tribes of man; but it must be confessed, that no encouraging impression has been made, in a single instance, upon any great and particularly civilized people."

The nations of Europe, like the United States, consider themselves "great and particularly civilized," and refuse, to the missionaries, the use of the "rattan," and hence their want of success. It is no uncommon thing in those countries to see crowds of men and women, either engaged in business or amusing themselves on days of preaching; and still, all ecclesiastical power, to force them to church and to Heaven, is absolutely denied to these pious, proselyting Evangelists.

GR008 MISSIONISM IN THE WEST INDIES CHAPTER VIII

 

MISSIONISM IN THE WEST INDIES

The following account of Christianity in Jamaica, is taken from a letter written by Rev. Jacob Weston, and published in the Utica Baptist Register, N. Y., a New School paper—and republished in the Advocate and Monitor, N. Y., an Old School paper, from which we take it, and the editors comment:

"But I proceed to state a little more definitely the Leadership System. Nearly every estate has a man called a leader, generally appointed by the missionary, who conducts the meetings held by the people on his estate.

"It is the leader's duty to induce persons to be set off. When he finds one willing, such person is brought into the class— room and assigned to a particular seat, when after some heathenish ceremonies, the candidate is made to kneel and repeat over a short prayer, which the leader puts, word by word, into his mouth. After this the leader takes him by the hand, saying, 'In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, I raise you to newness of life.' They are now termed by the missionaries, inquirers, and receive an inquirer ticket. And both missionaries and people believe, or pretend to believe, that when a person is thus set off by the leader, he is made a new creature, or born again. After being set off, the candidate is instructed in a round of questions and answers similar to the lectures in the Masonic Lodge. The leader at the first puts the questions, and gives the answers.

"When it is supposed the candidate can answer the questions expertly, if he please the leader and give him sufficient money, he is taken to the Missionary in these words: 'Minister, here are some fit to be baptized, I give them good character.' The Missionary then questions them as he pleases. But here let me remark that the Missionary asks the same questions as are asked in the class— meeting by the leader. If the candidates do not answer the Missionary readily, the Leader who stands by, answers for them. Frequently have I seen the candidate turn to the Leader and ask him what to answer. After the examination, the Missionary enrolls their names in a book for baptism.

"The leader has the whole care of making Christians, and I think I may say the acknowledged care. For one missionary, who has baptized over five thousand, said, "I do not know that I have ever been instrumental in the conversion of a single soul. All were converted at the time the Leader set them off.

"When baptised, the white inquirer ticket is exchanged for a red member ticket.

"Several times when I was examining candidates for baptism, I told them, that I feared they had never been born again. Upon which they would go away with the Leader a while and by and by return, saying, 'now minister we can answer the questions.' On one such occasion I labored more than two hours, trying to convince one who had returned in this way, that if he wss not a Christian before, I feared he was not now. I told him that he might answer all my questions, and yet not be a Christian. But he seemed to get no idea of what I meant. He said 'tother minister always take them, when the Leader tell them what to answer; and he spose 1 have some mad against him, so I no baptize him.' My heart bled for the poor soul, and for thousands of others, going to destruction under the care of, I had almost said, 'blind leaders of the blind.'

"This manner of making Christians accounts for the 'glorious news' we so often hear from the island of Jamaica, of the triumphs of God's grace. O, my soul, come not thou into their secret.

"Many of the missionaries receive by their tickets, as a consequence of the Leadership system, more than five hundred dollars per month. And by exchanging as they call it, once in four weeks, they make thirteen months a year. For this money they make no account with the society at home. The plate of these missionaries; their equipage; their sumptuous fare, would astonish people in this Republican land. They riot on the price of souls of their people, and then wiping their mouths, they say, 'We have done no wickedness.' Is this language too severe? These vast sums are given by these poor unsuspecting people with the confident expectation of procuring an admittance to Heaven therewith. The missionaries know this! What then can I say less."

On the foregoing extract the editor of the Monitor comments as follows:

"The above is only a part of a letter from one, who had personally witnessed the practice of the system, as presented in that number of the Register, the whole being too long for us to copy. Two things which herein appear, might more fully be exposed by further quotation: but let this for the present suffice, as an exhibition of the high— handed traffic in souls, and the Heaven daring lies and delusions, practiced in the 19th century, by certain men, called Baptist Missionaries. O, tell it not in Gath, except it be to warn the nations of the earth of such as may come to them in sheep's clothing, while inwardly they are remaining wolves!

"It is true, many are at home embarked in the benevolent doings, as they are called, for conscience sake, supposing them to be instructed by the Gospel, and necessary for its extension. To such we would say, 'Search the Scriptures,' and see, if this or that be there required; and if ye love the Lord Jesus Christ, and cannot build on your own works, nor teach others to do so, be exhorted, in the Lord's name, to come out of Babylon, and all her practices.

"The Gospel of the Son of God we love, and in its behalf hope to be found laboring, whether for its extension or defence; and to see the gracious fruits of the Spirit fitly manifested in all the dear saints unto the praise of Him, who has called them, is our earnest prayer. But we abominate all those tricks, and humanly originated schemes, which lead the children of God into captivity, to the maxims of worldly policy; and which give room for the apostles of Satan, to practice their craft, in making a gain of godliness, "deceiving and being deceived."

"The system, here under consideration, will admit of almost an endless variety of forms and shape, through the wisdom of such as are concerned in shearing the sheep and goats. Nor need Mr. Weston be surprised, if his character be assailed, or his truth called in question, even by many of that kind of professed Baptists, in this his native land, who are strenuously seeking to systemize things so finely, that ministerial support shall be, by taxing the church and world; while benevolence shall be enforced by the precept and authority of blind guides.

"Who does not know, that the system of modern doctrines and practices, in relation to making Christians at home, as well as professedly extending the Gospel abroad, is daily becoming, under the agency of New School principles and men, more and more like the Popish traffic in 'indulgencies,' or the old delusive system of priestly pardon.'"

 

GR009 MISSIONISM IN POLYNESIA CHAPTER IX

MISSIONISM IN POLYNESIA

The following is taken from the 'Banner of Liberty/ a paper published in the State of New York:

"It is a very common thing to hear boasting of the good results of missionary labor in improving the morals of the natives of the Sandwich Islands. The accounts, however, from that country are generally written by missionaries themselves, and hence the reason of their bos sting. Other kind of writers give a very different view of things; and, as proof of it, we present the following on the subject from John C. Jones, Esq., who was formerly United States Consul at Oahu. Mr. Jones resided at the islands nearly twenty years, and of course was well qualified to judge of the effects of missionary labors, and the influence of the missionaries upon the lives, and conduct of the natives. This extract was first published some time ago, but it is as appropriate now as it was then. Mr. Jones says:

"I came to this land when, I may almost say, another order of beings peopled these shores. The native population, in the days of the good and great Kamehameha, possessed different feelings from those we now see around us, and with whom we are compelled to associate. Then, the white man was respected, and the stranger, humble though he might have been, found a welcome at the abode of the savage.

"Professed Christianity has been proclaimed throughout these benighted isles, but what has been its effects? Where are its fruits? We cannot see them manifested in the true piety of the converts; we cannot see them displayed in the acts of justice, and benevolence of its boasted professor; what, then, has it effected? The destruction of every finer feeling which this unsophisticated people once possessed. It has swept from them every sense of humanity and hospitality which was so characteristic of them in by— gone days; it has constituted them a nation of hypocrites.

"I would not be understood to say, that this has been the effect of true Christianity, such as was taught by the merciful son of God; but is Christianity inculcated by biased emissaries, sent out by the professors of a particular doctrine, to sectarianize and plunder these unsuspecting children of nature!

"The fruits of the spirit, I have always been taught to believe, are love, peace, and charity; and when I can see such virtues eminate from the word that is proclaimed, then, and not till then, shall I be willing to go hand in hand with those who encompass sea and land to evangelize the natives of Hawaii.

"But this people are fast passing away; death is stalking abroad among these beautiful isles, sweeping away, with frightful rapidity, their once dense population. In a few years they will cease to exist, only in remembrance, and, at no protracted period, the inquisitive white man, as he ponders over the structure of their remains, will wonder to what order of beings they belonged."

Our limits will not permit us to publish the shameful and anti— Christian conduct of the missionaries in these islands. This has already been done, to some extent, by a portion of the political and religious press of this country. We have given the results of missionary influence among the natives, as witnessed by the United States consul, who resided there nearly twenty years. We must now hasten to our own country and talk about things nearer home.

The following letter, dated Washington City, March 5, 1831, and signed by six Indian chiefs, was taken from the Washington Globe:

"We, the Chiefs and Sachems of the Senaca Nation of Indians of Sandusky, Ohio, have often heard of the goodness of our white brothers and sisters in the United States, and that they have given and sent many presents of money, cloth, and clothing to us, to relieve the distress of our women and children. We thank them for their charity and good will; but we solemnly say to them that we have never received from them a cent of money, nor cloth or clothing.

"Brothers and Sisters: We speak the truth to you as it is given to us by the Great Spirit, in whom we trust and believe, and wish you to listen to us that you may no longer be in the dark. We hear that collections have often been made in all your churches for us, and that you, from the best motives towards us, have entrusted them to the missionaries, whom we call black coats, to present us.

"Brothers and sisters: We ask you all in the name of the Great Spirit, in whom red and white men believe, not to send anything more to be given us by the black-coats.

"Brothers and sisters: We ask you to hear what we say, for it is true. We have found the black— coats treacherous and they deceive us. They come among us and ask us to give them our property for saving our souls after we die. We do not like it, for they know no more about the next world than we do. We think the Great Spirit will save our souls and that the black— coats cannot.

"Brothers and sisters: How can we have confidence in men who have deceived both you and us? We feel friendship and affection for you, and we know you feel the same for us. We wish you to know the truth, and we will tell it to you. If you send us any more presents, we hope you will send them by honest men, who do not pretend to so much goodness.

"Christian brothers and sisters: We red children of Nawoneti, whom we call the Great Spirit, who is present everywhere, now give you a talk which we hope will be long remembered by you all. Do not be deceived by the black— coats. We believe they are sent out by the Bad Spirit to make a talk to us. If the Great Spirit had sent them out, they would have given us your presents, and their talk would have made us better! but their talk do us no good, and we hear nothing of the presents you sent us.

"Brothers and sisters: We do not worship the Great Spirit as you do, but our belief in him and our worship is sincere, and we think it acceptable to Him. You do not think so. If we should send out our teachers of our religion to you, you would not believe them. It is contrary to your belief, but your black— coats say we must believe yours. You have your own teachers, let us have ours. We are grateful for your kindness. We should be glad to have you send persons to teach us how to plow and reap, and teach us all the arts of agriculture. This would make us happy—but the black— coats cannot.

"Brothers and sisters: This is the truth that you have not known before. We are your friends, and v/ish that you may not be deceived."

As our limits require us to be brief, we will pass over many other items, and give an extract from the writings of Joseph Erwin, relative to the Choctaw Indians in Mississippi. He emigrated to the Natchez country in 1783; was a member of the first Baptist church formed in the State, and a delegate in the Convention which formed the first Association, and has been an orderly Baptist ever since:

"There has been abundance said in our religious world, about evangelizing and converting the heathen of Burmah, Hindostan, &c. But let us look at the effect of missionary labors among the poor heathen at home. I live at this time nearly in the centre of the Choctaw nation, now occupied by the whites, where the missionaries swelled their neck veins for years among the wild men of the forest; trying to evangelize the hearts of that people; trying to stimulate them to receive the Gospel of Christ. And after spending thousands of dollars among the Choctaws, and other red tribes, what is the result of all their efforts? why hardly a remaining vestige of all their missionary labor.

"Although it may seem bordering on the marvellous— and it is no gratification to me to say it—yet, there are living persons now in this land, that have been eye— witnesses to the application of the whip or cow hide on the backs of numbers of the red men of the forest, in enforcing the doctrines of the Gospel upon them. Yes, in this very land where I now live, the most unlimited extent of blind infatuation. There are powerful arguments in the whip, when it is applied with judgment, but I don't believe it ever evangelized the heart of a poor sinner."

The author of this work, having been engaged for a number of years in surveying land for the general government, among the Choctaws, previous to their removal west of the Mississippi river, had a fair opportunity of learning something of their religious ceremonies, none of which had the least "vestige" of true Christianity. Indeed, the external forms of Christianity was no where found among them; no, not even in the slightest degree. But it is now said that the missionaries "have done many wonderful works" among them, which of course is an additional proof of the great propriety of their removal to a dark corner of the world, seeing that they could not be converted in the presence of an intelligent community.

GR010 MISSIONISM AMONG THE AMERICANS CHAPTER X

MISSIONISM AMONG THE AMERICANS

We must now leave the heathen and turn our attention to missionism among our own people. The United States, like other "great and particularly civilized nations," refuse to the missionaries the use of the rattan, whip or cow— hide, which have proved to be such powerful auxiliaries among the ruder tribes of men. Hence we shall now show a different mode of operations, suited to the circumstances. In allusion to the manners and customs of the different nations in which he traveled, the apostle Paul says, "I was all things to all men:' and this the missionaries seem to think, alluded to religious doctrine and practice. And therefore they preach and practice such things as are best calculated to fascinate the carnal mind; to draw large congregations together; and initiate large numbers into their churches.

The avowed object of the great missionary enterprise is to advance the Redeemer's kingdom, to evangelize the world, and usher in the millenium. Money is the power, and the numberless benevolent institutions of the day are the means, by which this grand object is to be accomplished. It is well understood that the evangelizing machinery, however skilfully constructed, will not work without a due application of power. Therefore one of the great cardinal points, at all times, and on all occasions, is to get money. And it would be interesting and instructing to investigate the hundred and one modes in which this is done. Our limits, however, will permit us to notice only a few.

The corrupt interpretations of the scriptures on this subject are so palpable that none but those who are wilfully blind, and love to have it so, can be deceived. The following extract from a paper prepared for the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions will exhibit what they are pleased to call the divine plan, viz:

"It is to contribute frequently and statedly. Upon the first day of the week. This is frequently, for it is once in seven days. Nor shall we think that God calls too frequently, if he calls once a week, to make some appropriate acknowledgment of his right, by giving a portion of what he gives us, to carry on his peculiar work in the world, and to save the perishing; to save them, not from starvation, but from perdition. Can once a week be too frequently to lay by in store to feed the hungry and clothe the naked? Was it not ordered in the churches of Galatia as well as in the church of Corinth, that the same rule should be observed? And can we hesitate for a moment to adopt it in regard to the evangelizing of the world. Once a week—can this be too often to make a pecuniary contribution to send the word of life, or the messenger of mercy, announcing life to those who are dead in sin? Were our souls where theirs are, should we think once a week too often to be thought of, and prayed for, and labored for, that we might live? Relief must be had. God has ordered it to be given by us, and given on the first day of the week. Frequently, so that we may never forget it.

"It is to contribute universally, 'every one of you.' It is a duty to contribute frequently and statedly for evangelizing the world. Whose duty is it? The "duty of every Christian. It is a privilege? Whose privilege? Does our Lord demand the service of every one? Does he not, at the same time, allow every one the privilege? Who is it, then, among all his friends, that is to be exempt from the duty? Who that is to be deprived of the privilege? Not one. Due allegiance is expected of all, and due favor is shown to all. It is ordained that every one shall lay by him in store. How suitable and how beautiful is this arrangement! Here the whole church of Christ, the high and the low, the rich and the poor, the male and the female, appear before him on the first day of the week. Nor does any one appear empty. Every one lays by him in store an offering as an acknowledgment of obligation and Thanksgiving. This being done frequently and statedly, and on that day of consecration and blessing, it is suited to produce the most happy results. Here all hearts beat in unison before the face of the Lord. This act is done by every one in his own dwelling, under the eye of the Lord, who seeth not as man seeth, but looketh upon the heart. From a principle of obedience and love every redeemed sinner gives an offering to the Lord. While this method cherishes the best feelings towards God our Savior, and towards his people and cause, it does, at the same time, lie at the basis of all that is needful by way of contribution.

"For a moment think of the power which the mighty Saviour can call into action on this principle. Suppose a church of two hundred and fifty members. Let every one be poor, and every one lay by only the widow's two mites, which make a farthing. One cent a week from two hundred and fifty Christians, will amount in a year, to at least one hundred and twenty— five dollars! Is not the Divine Method one of great power? How vast the sum from a million of Christians!—from a million of poor Christians! Not less than five hundred thousand dollars!

"But this is by no means the divine standard of contribution. It is only the frequency and universality that we have yet considered. And far be it from us to intimate that the rich are to contribute no more than the poor. Such is by no means the Divine Method."

The foregoing is certainly as ingenious a sophism on the subject as any that has ever fallen under our observation. And as it embraces the substance of all the arguments for raising money for missionary purposes, we feel disposed to lay the scripture, from which such deductions are drawn, before the reader, that he may see the contrast and draw his own inferences. The following is about every thing in the New Testament bearing on this subject:

"And in these days came prophets from Jerusalem unto Antioch. And there stood up one of them named Agabus, and signified by the Spirit, that there should be a great dearth throughout all the world; which came to pass in the days of Claudius Caesar. Then the disciples, every man according to his ability, determined to send relief unto the brethren which dwelt in Judea: Which also they did, and sent it to the elders by the hands of Barnabas and Saul.—Ac 11:27,30.

"But now I go to Jerusalem, to minister unto the saints. For it hath pleased them of Macedonia and Achaia to make a certain contribution for the poor saints which are at Jerusalem. It hath pleased them verily; and their debtors they are. For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, their duty is also to minister unto them in carnal things.—Ro 15:25,27.

"Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I have given order to the churches of Galatia, even so do ye. Upon the first day of the week, let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come. And when I come, whomsoever ye shall approve by your letters, them will I send to bring your liberality unto Jerusalem. And if it be meet that I go also, they shall go with me.— 1Co 16:1,4.

"Moreover, brethren, we do you to wit of the grace of God bestowed on the churches of Macedonia: How that, in a great trial of affliction, the abundance of their joy and their deep poverty abounded unto the riches of their liberality. For to their power, (I bear record,) yea, and beyond their power, they were willing of themselves: Praying us with much entreaty that we would receive the gift, and take upon us the fellowship of the ministering to the saints.—2Co 8:1,4.

"For as touching the ministering to the saints, it is superflous for me to write to you. For I know the forwardness of your mind, for which I boast of you to them of Macedonia, that Achaia was ready a year go; and your zeal hath provoked very many. Yet have I sent the brethren, lest our boasting of you should be in vain in this behalf; that, as I said, ye may be ready: Lest haply if they of Macedonia come with me, and find you unprepared, we (that we say not you) should be ashamed in this same confident boasting. Therefore, I thought it necessary to exhort the brethren, that they would go before unto you, and make up before hand your bounty, whereof ye had notice before, that the same might be ready, as a matter of bounty, and not as of coveteousness. But this I say, he which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully, shall reap bountifully. Every man according as he proposeth in his own heart, so let him give; not grudgingly or of necessity, for God loveth a cheerful giver.—2Co 9:1,7."

If the reader can see any authority in the foregoing quotations from the New Testament for begging money in the name of the Lord, to send the Gospel to the heathen, his perception is much keener than ours. Indeed, the very reverse is taught, in the quotation from Romans, as a duty. "For if the Gentiles have been made partakers of their spiritual things, their duty is also to minister unto them in carnal things." The only object set forth in the collecting of these contributions, was to supply the necessity of the saints—but the missionaries have reversed the rule, and beg money for the heathen. Paul calls it ministering to the saints—but the missionaries minister to the heathen. Paul instructed the churches for each member to lay by him in store upon the first day of the week—but the missionary rule is to contribute money every Sunday. Paul encouraged the collection of contributions for a specific purpose—but the missionaries for every purpose which their vain and fruitful imaginations, can invent and call benevolent. Paul's object was to minister to the saints in carnal things—but the missionaries, is to minister to the heathen in spiritual things. The Apostolic purpose was to save the saints from starving— but the missionary purpose is to save the heathen from perdition. The Apostle calls the contribution carnal things —but the missionaries call it the power of Christ. "For a moment, say they, think of the power which the mighty Saviour can call into action on this principle."

For the purpose of accumulating the power here alluded to, many plans are put in operation. One is to send out begging agents, and give them a certain per cent on all they can obtain. Another is to have missionary sermons preached on stated occasions; when the most skilful sophist is selected, to play upon the sympathies of the people, and obtain money under false pretences. On these occasions it is usual for the speaker to represent the heathen as crying for help to save them from perdition.

But We have given ample testimony to show, that, instead of this, they cry as an oppressed people, against the tyranny of the anti-Christian crusaders.

We might here with propriety say, that there is not one instance, by precept or example, to be found in the New Testament, of taking up a contribution for sending the Gospel from one country to another. But on the contrary it is positively forbid. The only rule ever laid down by Christ or his Apostles for this purpose is, "Provide neither gold nor silver, nor brass in your purses; nor scrip for your journey, &c, for the laborer is worthy of his hire, &c. And into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you, &c. But into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you not, go your ways out into the streets of the same, and say: even the very dust of your city which cleaveth on us, we do wipe off against you."

But the missionaries, though they profess to know God, yet in works they deny him. They set at naught the rules and regulations laid down by the King of Zion, and practice plans invented by their own evil imaginations. Insteaa of contributing to the necessities of the poor, as the Lord has commanded, they would beg from them their last cent, and then brag behind the curtain of their success— thus glorying in their own shame. This they do under the pretence of enforcing Christian duty; and though they have no scripture authority for such conduct, yet they are enabled to lead "silly women" astray, and consequently the men, through the influence of a pious conclave associated together in one common cause. They make merchandize of the people, under false pretences, by first corrupting public opinion on the subject, and then bringing it to bear upon them—thus forcing them to give, merely to avoid censure. And this is all done in the name of the Lord; and that too for the avowed purpose of saving the heathen from perdition.

But it would be easy to prove, by a fair mode of reasoning, that, though they may have an outside accumulating faith on the subject, yet, they have not an internal conscientious faith. The manner and purposes for which they spend money is alone ample proof on this subject. The disbursing of missionary funds among the officers and agents has been a source of loud complaint by those who support the cause. The following from the Boston Investigator, will somewhat illustrate the views and objects of the missionary leaders who live in the large cities, and control the funds:

"We never had any doubt but there were some who supported religion from the best motives; but we believe that many support it with about the same object in view that the multitude had when they followed Jesus—namely, for 'the loaves and fishes.' This making a trade of religion is a shocking evil. We find tract societies established; charitable institutions set on foot; new plans devised to meliorate our condition: new buildings erected; new laws devised; new improvements suggested; and when we follow them up and see them organized, we shall find the pious, humane, and totally disinterested projectors filling the lucrative places of presidents, scribes, agents, clerks, printers, &c.—a son here, a brother there, and religion is made to answer the purpose of private gain, under the specious pretext of public good.

"As an instance in point, the 'Missionary House' in this city pays four secretaries a salary of six thousand yearly; and out of more than ten thousand dollars raised the last year by the Foreign Evangelical Society, not less than six thousand were expended in agencies, &c. This is the principle upon which religious teachers, as a class, conduct their performances. They labor for money just as much as the mechanic who builds a house or a ship. The only difference is, the missionaries are not half as honest as the mechanic, inasmuch as they pretend not to work for money, which in fact amounts to a system of cheating, or, as they say in law, 'obtaining goods under false pretences.'

"Society requires reform, there is no doubt, but it cannot be effected by these money— making, pious schemers. It must be done by precept and example, by justice, generosity, mild persuasion, disinterested benevolence, unmitigated love and kindness, and not got up under the shape of contributions for missionaries, tract societies, &c.

"On every side we perceive new schemes to obtain money for religious purposes—converting the heathen, sending missionaries abroad, building churches, holding religious fairs, buying up theatres for purposes of pious speculation, establishing pious newspapers, &c.

"These sums which could be converted to obiects of charity, to feed the hungry, and clothe the naked are taken from those who cannot afford them, to constitute a fund which is to be expended under the superintendance of certain men. The annual amount raised for such purposes in this country is immense, and we are feeling the force of it, not in substantial and wholesome reforms, but in the meddling interference in private concerns—invading the sanctity of domestic retirement, and attempting to hold public opinion and public will in a thraldom almost as oppressive as the inquisition itself. We are told that this is all for real goodness and sincere piety; and he who objects to it is no friend of benevolence and true religion. Let us beware of fanaticism, of bigotry, and intolerance; they are the curses of human society; and always assume some plausible shape to deceive and beguile. Men do not always practice as they preach; and when we see profit introduced under the panoply of spiritual guides, we can see no grounds for believing that a system of religion which thus encourages hypocrisy is of any utility in promoting human happiness."

Again we quote from the Portland Boat, published in the State of Maine, viz:

"The pews in Calvary Church, New York, were lately sold at auction for forty thousand dollars; and it is said that the society, in addition to a salary of five thousand dollars per year, has given its Rector fifteen thousand dollars, furnished a parsonage house, and insured his life to the amount of ten thousand dollars!

"This church is rightly named: it was at Mount Calvary that the body of Christ was crucified; and at this New York Calvary, this mountain of pride and sin, he is 'crucified afresh and put to open shame.' Just think of Christ with a little band of humble fishermen, going up and down the world doing good, without where to lay his head, preaching from fishing boats, among the poor, the sick and the afflicted, gathering grain and rubbing it out of the chaff with his hands to appease his hunger; eating with the poor, tarrying at night with those most despised of the world; without popularity, despised, hated, reviled, persecuted; without salary, asking none, yet continuing to do good even to his enemies; and in his last breath asking foregiveness for those who nailed him to the tree. Just think of Him and His humble course, through poverty and abuse, and then think of the Right

Rev. Dr. H, of New York—a professed disciple of this lowly Master—in his forty thousand dollar church, with a present of fifteen thousand dollars in his pocket, and a yearly salary of five thousand more! with his life insured to the amount of ten thousand. Verily, if this be the religion of Jesus, it has wonderfully changed since first preached on the mountains, and by the sea side, eighteen hundred years ago.

"A forty thousand dollar church built with money gained by buckling, cheating, lying, grinding the face of the poor, robbing the widows and the fatherless! A fifteen thousand dollar present, and a five thousand dollar salary, the money gained by the same means! Now, who is there in this broad nation that does not know that such a religion must be a curse, and nothing else but a curse, to all concerned? Who has not sense enough to see that this is as directly opposite to the religion of Jesus as darkness is to light? and yet, my friends, whether you will believe it or not, this church is no worse at heart than nearly all other churches in the land; but give them the means, and small is the number of such as would not wander just as far from the truth, and be just as ready to crucify Christ afresh, and put him to open shame.

"It is surprising that there are infidels in the world, and that the number increases, while the professed follower of the meek and lowly Jesus manifested such monstrous hypocrisy?"

Is it possible that these people, who make such a lavish expenditure of money, for such purposes, do, in the sincerity of their hearts, believe that that money could have been made instrumental in saving souls from perdition? If so, do they not act grossly, yea, fiendishly inconsistent with their faith? Yet saving the heathen from perdition is the theme of all these missionary denominations, and begging money as a power to accomplish this end! Yea, they would beg the last dime from the poor and needy, who, according to the letter and spirit of the gospel, should be objects of their charity. And when thus blasphemously obtained in the name of the Lord, for unwarranted purposes, it is huddled together in large sums to be disposed of by certain men in our large cities.

GR011 CORNER STONE EXERCISES OF THE STRONG PLACE BAPTIST CHURCH, BROOKLYN CHAPTER XI

CORNER STONE EXERCISES OF THE STRONG PLACE BAPTIST CHURCH, BROOKLYN

"The introductory exercises were by Rev. Dr. Welsh and Rev. Mr. Hodge. Address by Rev. Dr. Dowling, Ceremony of laying the stone, with the benediction, by the pastor.

"The address was one of the happiest efforts of the author, particularly Baptistical and orthodox. While the speaker disclaimed any New Testament injunction or precept for the customary ceremony in laying the corner stone of a church edifice, he nevertheless most happily showed the appropriateness of such a service, and satisfied his hearers that in its observance on the present occasion neither himself nor the church and society engaged in the enterprise could be charged with 'going toward Rome.' "

Of course not. Every beast must have his day. The first has had his, and now the second must reign. Therefore, instead of your 'going toward Rome,' she must come towards you, and present you with the image. See 13th chapter of Revelation.

The description of the exercises, from the Recorder, thus continues:

"The history of the Baptists and their connection with the development and progress of religious liberty in England and our own country, was briefly but most happily set forth. It was on the whole one of the most interesting ceremonies of this nature, we were ever privileged to enjoy. The leaden box, closely sealed and put in the corner stone, contained, among other matters, the following: A Bible, bearing the imprint of the American and Foreign Bible Society; Brooklyn City Directory; New York Recorder, Watchman and Reflector, and other denominational papers; Annual Reports of denominational Societies; a quantity of American coin, &c.

"The prospects of the young church and society are encouraging. They have a subscription of twenty thousand dollars raised among themselves, with expectations of a still farther increase from the vicinity in which their house is located, of which it is to be an ornament. The church was constituted in March, 1849, with but sixty— six members; it now numbers one hundred and ninety— three. They built their present chapel at an expense of about ten thousand dollars, and supposed it would be ample in its accommodations for four or five years. The increase of the church and congregation has so far exceeded their expectations as to render it necessary to enlarge immediately the place of their habitation. Their contracts require the house to be ready for occupancy by the first of April next.

"The building, with a spire of about two hundred feet, is to be of solid stone work. A description of the design of the building will be hereafter given."

Now why, we ask in all candor, was this 'quantity of American coin' hid in a 'leaden box' from all practical use, while those who did it profess to believe it might have been instrumental in saving souls from eternal death? Which are we to believe, their words or their acts?

Again, they had twenty thousand dollars subscribed, to which they expected a farther increase, for building a new chapel, with a spire of two hundred feet. Why all this extravagance to make their chapel an 'ornament to the vicinity?' If this people believed what they pretend to believe, would it not be more consoling to their hearts and consciences to worship in a house less costly, and with the balance of the money save a portion of the heathen from endless woe, than to gratify their pride and vanity by an ostentatious display? Surely, they could have curtailed a little for the benefit of the poor heathen, even if it had been only ten feet of the spire. That would have left one hundred and ninety feet, which, if not so 'ornamental,' certainly would have been ample for a Baptist church.

We shall now conclude this part of the subject with an extract from a letter written by Rev. Joseph Kennard, to the New York Recorder, showing the spirit and manner of raising funds for these purposes, viz:

"I suppose you have accounts of the progress of mission feeling among our churches. I have been a pastor many years in Philadelphia, but I have never before witnessed anything to equal what we have seen in the last two weeks. The spirit of God seems to be poured out from on high. The meeting of last Wednesday evening was with my people, and to my grateful astonishment resulted in securing twenty— six life— memberships, in the midst of a special effort to pay a heavy debt on our meeting house. As a friend of Missions you will rejoice in this result. The same spirit is manifested in all the churches in this city."

We must now conclude this chapter on Missions. We have designedly travelled over a wide field, for the purpose of showing the outline of missionary character. But we must inform the reader, that we have mainly kept on the outskirts. We have not attempted to enter the deep, dark, mysterious ocean of iniquity, which has been practiced by priestcraft among "the great and particularly civilized nations of the earth." As the grand objects of missions is to evangelize the world and to advance the Redeemer's kingdom, we will conclude this chapter with a few extracts, showing the result of all their efforts. Lest we might be considered unfair in our selections, we have given extracts relative to the state of morals in Boston and New York City, the great headquarters of missionism.

The Boston Christian Observer, of October 24, 1851, in a leading editorial, after alluding to the recent murders in that city, says:

"Other vices are by no means confined to our foreign population, as we have continual occasion to know. We must, then, come to the conclusion that the morals of our city, taking its population, with their origin, numbers, &c, into the account, is alarmingly low. If we were disposed to dwell upon the vice of licentiousness alone, and give the proofs which are at hand of its existence in high places, as well as low, and especially among heads of families, of both sexes, the same conclusion would be reached."

The New York Recorder comments on the above as follows, viz:

"Such a statement as this, and particularly that portion of it which I have black faced, call for the instant and serious consideration of every true friend of his country. For what is alleged of the morals of Boston, it is to be feared is also applicable to our own city; indeed, to the country at large."

The foregoing extracts are the admissions of missionary papers. If our limits and inclination permitted, we could select hundreds of extracts, from the religious and political press, showing a worse picture of affairs than is exhibited above.

We shall now close this chapter with an extract from the Sunday Times, being a reply of the late Major Noah, a learned Israelite, to a question propounded, relative to the second coming of Christ, viz:

"He would, we think, be less welcome to the Christians than to the Jews. He could not, we think, recognize reformed religion which is carried out in his name. He who preached against pride, ostentation and arrogance —who was the friend of the poor, and rebuked the rich and worldly— minded—who preached peace on earth and good will to men—who ordained obedience to the laws and submission to rulers—would not brook the desecration of the Christian pulpit, occupied by some men who endeavor to stir up rebellion and division among the people—who falsely quote the scriptures to carry out their fanaticism—who openly defy the laws, and wickedly commend opposition to them—who are sowing division and misery throughout the land. He would say, 'I had trouble with the Scribes and Pharisees, who were my own people—they did not recognize my mission; but here are my followers—as they represent themselves to be—who ought, in my name, to carry out my principles, but do not—who consider that there are many of my orders, directions, and doctrines which they cannot carry out, alleging that they do not conform to the spirit of the age! !' He would find his own people as he left them two thousand years ago—with one faith and one God; but the modern church he would find divided into numerous sects, one arrayed against the other—preaching all kinds of doctrines— and understanding better what he meant to establish than he did himself. The question is not, 'How could the Jews receive him?' but, 'How would he be received by those professing to be Christians?"

GR012 BAPTISTS IN MISSISSIPPI CHAPTER XII

BAPTISTS IN MISSISSIPPI

Previous to 1785, a few families had immigrated from South Carolina, and settled near Natchez, which was then a Spanish province. Some of these were regular Baptists. Driven from their native State by the pressure of the Revolution, they sought a peaceful home in the wilderness, far away from the tumults of war. But even here, they soon found, that they had not passed the bounds of the great enemy of peace—"All that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution;"—and here they suffered persecution, through the instrumentality of nominal Christians. Yea, those who professed to be followers of the "meek and lowly Jesus," became the instruments of Satan, to vent his bitter spite against the Regular Baptists. And what for? Was it for sedition against the civil authorities? No. Was it for immoral conduct? No. It was for nothing more nor less than what the Catholic priest was pleased to consider heresy in religion.

A regular Baptist Licentiate, in the year above mentioned "mounted the rostrum, and declared publicly to the surrounding country, the plan of salvation by grace; and preached the pure and gentle doctrine of the Gospel. Thus affairs moved on till 1793, when the high Priest, "like Demetrius of old, began to take the alarm, thinking that his craft was in danger, by the propagation and growth of such heretical principles." The Rev. Ecclesiastic commanded silence and implicit obedience to the Catholic religion. Finding his edict disregarded by the Baptists, he had recourse to the civil authority to suppress such heresy. Accordingly, "Richard Curtis (the Baptist Licentiate,) was denounced as an incorrigible heretic, with all his adherents; and consequently, if there were five subsequently found together, in a religious capacity, they should be put in confinement."

In 1794 said Curtis returned to South Carolina, where he was ordained to the ministry by the Regular Baptists. His preaching in the Natchez country had so aroused the resentment of the Catholics, that, during his absence, they seized several of his adherents and cast them into prison. "Elder Curtis now returned to his brethren and friends, fully authorized to fill the different functions of the Gospel, as a minister of Christ. This will bring us up to 1795 when the United States negotiated with Spain for this country. The negotiation being announced, and Popish fetters broken, there was nothing to fear from that quarter. In this same year Elder Curtis, acting the part of an under— shepherd, gathered the few scattered sheep to the fold, when they were constituted into a church on the old regular predestinarian plan, by the name of "Salem Church, on Cole's creek," in Jefferson county.

Emigration now began to come in rapidly from South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee, among whom were many Regular Baptists, some of whom were ordained ministers. In 1797, Newhope church, on Second creek, near Natchez, was constituted, on the same principles of Salem church. In 1803 and '4, they were blessed with a "great revival in religion, under the preaching of Elder Thomas Mercer and others," which led to the constitution of other churches.

It will be necessary, here, to take some notice of Dr. James Mullen, a Baptist preacher, who moved into the territory about 1797. The Doctor preached and contended for the general atonement system, which was so contrary to regular Baptist doctrine, and the articles of faith, on which the Baptist churches in the territory had been constituted, that he was unable to obtain membership. He however, succeeded in drawing away from the churches some followers. But, after an unavailing effort for several years, not being able to realize his expectations, he left the territory, without ever constituting his adherents into a church.

The foregoing information was obtained principally from the writings of Joseph Erwin, who was born in Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1774, and emigrated to the vicinity of Natchez, in 1783. He was a member of the first Baptist church ever constituted in the Mississippi territory, and was a delegate for forming the first Association. He has been a member ever since, and is now living in Holmes county, and enjoying as good health as is usual for his age.

Before taking up the Associational minutes, we will give place to an extract from one of his letters, written in 1839, viz:

"When, alas, the enemy began to make inroads upon us by sending young theologians from the Academies as missionaries, who came in among us, and said we are of you; and the poor old Regulars not being always at their post, with unsuspecting simplicity received them into their arms, their bosoms, their pulpits, and dandled them on the knee; there being a train of them from the up country, all things appeared to go on well until those visitors had got well in the hearts and affections of the churches, and began to be looked up to as men of considerable weight and talent. Then it was that they began to vomit out their heterodoxical sentiments in all its multifarious forms. Campbellism was what they appeared to advocate most strenuously, after they had gained weight and influence in the churches.

"And now, brethren, it is a fact, that churches which were in good standing, and apparently in good health, were torn to pieces, and have never regained their former standing. And not only churches, but associations; the Mississippi and Union, have been powerfully shook with these seeds of corruption; and though those men are gone, yet the fruits of their baneful and heterodoxical sentiments have been left behind, as a lasting memorial of their deception. And now, brethren, this reminds me of what the Apostle Paul saith, that 'After my departure wolves should enter in among them (the churches) not sparing the flock; but scattering,' &c, and leading or drawing away disciples after them.

"Well, another Babel or Castle built in the air, was the Mississippi Baptist State Convention; when and where all the churches belonging to the different Associations must annually send up their delegates, with their pecuniary remittances to support theological schools, for the purpose of educating young men in and for the ministry.

"After the same had progressed a little, and got so it looked like it might stand on its legs, its features and forms could be more minutely discovered. And then the old Regulars, or some of them, did not like its shapes. They saw the impropriety of such a line of conduct— that it was not congenial with or to the Gospel plan— believing that God called and qualified his ministers for and to the work. And now down comes the building to the ground, because it could not live without money. The Old School boys being now twice bit, began to be a little more on their guard, and to stand aloof to things which they did not understand.

"Well, from some part of the State in pours the general atonement doctrine, with its multifarious doctrines, that Christ tasted death for every man equally alike, that all mankind are in a salvable state. The old Regulars opposed that doctrine strenuously, believing it to be false when weighed in the balance of the sanctuary.

"The Missionary System with all its multifarious train, were pressed upon the churches. But the old Regulars cannot submit to such measures, not believing them to be Apostolic. My remarks turn particularly on the above mentioned Associations. There are others of recent date, where the isms prevail abundantly, with their gigantic strides.

"The Primitive Baptist Association to which I belong has closed her doors against the above train of speculative notions, or moneyed institutions of the day; and I hope the day is not far distant, when all God's dear children will listen with attention to that solemn and pathetic invitation, 'Come out of her, my people.'"

GR013 THE MISSISSIPPI ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XIII

THE MISSISSIPPI ASSOCIATION

In July 1807, several churches met, by delegates, at Salem, in Jefferson county, and agreed to form themselves into an Association; and that each church appoint delegates to meet at Bethel, in Wilkinson county, in Sept., 1807. Accordingly the delegates, then and there, constituted the Mississippi Baptist Association:

PREAMBLE:

We, the churches of Jesus Christ, who have been regularly baptized upon a profession of our faith, are convinced of the necessity of a combination of churches, and of maintaining a correspondence, for the preserving a federal Union amongst all the churches of the same faith and order. We, therefore, do agree to unite and form ourselves into an Association upon the following principles, namely:

ARTICLES OF FAITH:

1.    We believe in one only true and living God, and that there are a trinity of persons in the God— head, the Father, the Son, the Holy Ghost, the same in essence, equal in power and glory.

2.    We believe the scriptures of the Old and New Testament were given by inspiration of God; are of divine authority, and the only rule of faith and practice.

3.    We believe in the fall of Adam; in the imputation of his sin to all his posterity:; in the total depravity of human nature; and in man's inability to restore himself to the favor of God.

4.    We believe in the everlasting love of God to his people; in the eternal unconditional election of a definite number of the human family to grace and glory.

5.    We believe that sinners are only justified in the sight of God, by the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ; which is unto all, and upon all them that believe.

6.    We believe all those who were chosen in Christ, before the foundation of the world, are in time effectually called, regenerated, converted and sanctified; and are kept by the power of God, through faith unto salvation.

7.    We believe there is one Mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, who by the satisfaction which he made to law and justice, in becoming an offering for sin, hath by his most precious blood, redeemed the elect from under the curse of the law, that they might be holy and without blame, before him in love.

8.    We believe good works are the fruits of faith, and follow after justification; are evidence of a gracious state; and that it is the duty of believers to perform them from a principle of love.

9. We believe in the resurrection of the dead, and a general judgment, and that the happiness of the righteous, and the punishment of the wicked will be eternal.

ON GOSPEL ORDER.

1.    We believe that the visible church of Jesus Christ, is a congregation of faithful persons who have given themselves up to the Lord, and to each other, and have convenanted to keep up a Godly discipline, agreeably to the rules of the Gospel.

2.    We believe that Jesus Christ is the head of the Church, the only law— giver; that the government is with the body, "the church," and is equally the right and privilege of each member thereof.

3.    We believe that Baptism and the Lord's supper are Gospel ordinances, appointed by Jesus Christ, and are to be continued in the church, until his second coming.

4.    We believe baptism, by immersion, is the only Scriptural mode, and that believers are the only proper subjects.

5.    We believe that none but regular baptized church members have a right to partake of the Lord's supper.

6.    We believe it to be the duty, and privilege, of all believers, to make a public confession of their faith to submit to baptism by immersion, and to give themselves members of the visible church.

7.    We believe it to be the duty of every regular organized church, to expel from her communion all disorderly members, who are immoral in their lives—or that hold doctrines contrary to the Scriptures.

RULES OF DECORUM.

1.    Those delegates who are regularly chosen by the churches in our Union, shall compose the Association.

2.    The delegates so chosen shall produce letters from their respective churches, certifying their appointment, together with their number, in fellowship, baptized, received by letter, restored, dismissed, excommunicated, and dead, since the last Association.

3.    The delegates thus chosen, and convened, shall be denominated the Mississippi Baptist Association.

4.    This Association shall have a Moderator and Clerk, who shall be chosen by the members present.

5.    If new churches desire to be admitted into the Union, they shall petition by letter and delegates. If, on examination, found orthodox, and orderly, shall be received by the Association, and manifested by the Moderator giving their delegates the right hand of fellowship.

6.    No church in the Union shall have a right to more than two delegates, until she shall exceed one hundred members—then she shall have a right to an additional delegate for every fifty.

7.    Every query sent to the Association, by any church of the Union, shall be read and put to vote by the Moderator, whether it shall be debated, and if there shall be a majority for it, it shall be taken up and investigated: Provided, always. That those be first considered, which effect the union of the churches.

8.    Every motion made and seconded shall be taken up by the Association, except it be withdrawn by the person who made it.

9.    Only one person shall speak at once, who shall rise from his seat and address the Moderator.

10.    The person thus speaking, shall not be interrupted except he depart from the subject, break the rules of decorum, or cast reflections on a brother; in which case he shall be immediately called to order by the Moderator.

11.    No person shall speak more than twice to the same subject, without leave of the Association.

12.    No brother shall be suffered to whisper or laugh during the conference; neither shall he absent himself without leave of the Moderator.

13.    The Moderator shall have the liberty of speaking to any question that may be debated, provided the chair be previously filled; and have the privilege of voting, only when the association are equally divided.

14.    The names of the delegates shall be enrolled by the Clerk, and called over as often as the Association may deem expedient.

15.    We think it absolutely necessary to have an Association fund, for defraying the expense of the same— for the raising and supporting of which, we think it the duty of each church in the Union to contribute such sums as they may deem proper, and send by the hands of their delegates to the Association—and the money thus contributed by the churches, shall be deposited in the hands of a Treasurer, by the Association appointed, who shall be accountable to the Association, for all monies by him received and paid out, according to the direction of the same.

16.    The minutes of the Association shall be read, (and corrected if necessary,) and signed by the Moderator and Clerk, before the Association rises.

17.    These rules of decorum and Gospel order, may be altered, changed or amended from time to time, or any part of them, when a majority of all the churches in the Association shall deem it necessary—but the Articles of Faith shall not be subject to any alteration, only as it respects form.

POWERS OF THE ASSOCIATION.

1.    It shall be the business of the association to provide for the general union of the churches.

2.    To keep up a friendly correspondence, when convenient, with those Associations of the same faith and order.

3.    This Association shall have no power to lord it over God's heritage, nor to infringe upon any of the internal rights of the churches.

4.    It shall be the duty of this Association to give the churches the best advice in their power in difficult matters—to enquire into any difficulties which may exist between sister churches, and remove them if possible.

5.    To admit any of the brethren in the ministry as assistants, but not to give them the privilige of voting.

6.    This association shall have the power to withdraw from any church in the Union, who may be unsound in principle, or immoral in practice, until reclaimed.

7.    To appoint any person or persons, by and with their consent, to transact any business which the Association may deem necessary.

8.    The Association shall have power to adjourn to any time or place they may think most proper.

9.    The Association shall be opened and closed by prayer.

1807 

In September, the first session of the Mississippi Baptist Association was held, at Bethel, in Wilkinson county, in which five churches were represented by delegates, viz: Salem, Newhope, Bethel, New Providence and Ebenezer— the aggregate strength, 196 members. It was agreed, that each church should, hereafter, send three delegates, and no more.

1808

In October, the second session was held at New Providence, Amite county, in which seven churches were represented—the five above named, and the Bayou Pierre and Morgan's Fork—aggregate strength 236 members—$26.50 sent up by the churches. Two union meetings were appointed, to be held during the ensuing associational year.

EXTRACT FROM THE MINUTES.

Query.—What steps would be most advisable to take with the members of our society, whose treatment to their slaves is unscriptural?

Answer.—We recommend to the several churches, belonging to our connexion, to take notice of any improper treatment, of their members, towards their slaves, and deal with them in brotherly love, according to the rules of the Gospel.

Query.—What shall be done with members of our society who live in the constant neglect of family worship.

Answer.—We recommend to the heads of families in our connexion, to keep up family worship, as a Christian duty, and where they do not, that Gospel steps be taken, in order that they may be reclaimed.*

Query.—Shall the ordination of a Minister of the Gospel, who may become a member of the Baptist Church, be considered valid, who was ordained by men not in our connexion?

Answered in the negative.

Query.—Is a brother under obligation in all cases of private offence, to go to his brother, and tell him his fault? Answered in the affirmative.

*This is the only instance in forty-odd years that the subject is named.

Brother T. Mercer, M. Hadley, and D. Snodgrass, were appointed a committee to enquire into the validity of brother John Wood's ordination, and if thought requisite to ordain him; and to report the result to the church.

1809

In October, the third session was held at Salem, in Jefferson county — same churches represented — aggregate strength 251 members — no money reported — three Union meetings appointed for the ensuing year. Brother M. Hadley was appointed to write the circular for next year. Brother T. Mercer, to preach the introductory sermon at the next association, and in case of failure, brother E. Courtney. Brother D. Cooper, to superintend the printing of the minutes.

Query.—Is it consistent with Gospel order to receive testimony from persons of good character, not of our connection, against a church member?

Answered in the affirmative.

EXTRACT FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER.

"For the better understanding of the mind of Christ on this subject, we shall observe in the first place, that the object of church censures, in whatever degree it may be necessary to use them, it is not the destruction, but the salvation (from error) of the unfortunate transgressor. Therefore, whether we exhort, admonish, reprove, or proceed to the high censure of excommunication, still our object should be the destruction or mortification of the flesh, that the spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord.

"But it is lamentable that possessors of religion are not always influenced by this principle. We may vent our spite, and gratify secret revenge, on a brother who has gone astray, and that under the spacious appearance of religion, and zeal for the Lord of hosts. But let that man tremble, who would thus pervert and prostitute sacred things to the gratification of a base, malicious passion. Let him recollect, that his hyprocrisy and malice will be detected, when he shall stand before the Judge of quick and dead.

"We shall next enquire whether the Gospel requires private labors to be used in cases of public transgression. It has been the prevailing opinion that private offences require private labors; but where the offence is public, the offender should be immediately cited to appear at the bar of the church; and that no previous steps were necessary. But, however general this opinion may have been, it is not according to the rule of the Gospel. Which, we trust, will clearly appear from the following observations, wherein we shall endeavor to prove, that private labors ought to be used in all cases of public offence, except where the sin is of so heinous and flagrant a nature, that the honor of religion would require the offender to be immediately excommunicated. For we have already observed, that the great object of the church should be to reclaim the offender. Therefore, those means should most certainly be adopted, which are best calculated to answer that purpose.

"Should we go to the offender in the spirit of Christ, tell him his fault, explain to him the nature and consequence of his transgression, and charge the sin upon his conscience; it would be more likely to bring him to repentance, than if he should be immediately cited to appear at the bar of the church. Where rash measures are used, there is reason to fear, that the heart of the offender, already hardened by sin, would still grow harder, and the sheep which has gone astray, would only wander farther into the wilderness. But the good Shepherd will pursue the lost sheep into the mountains; and when he has found it, he will not drag it home, nor yet attempt to drive it, but he will lay it on his shoulder and bring it to the fold again.

"We shall now examine Mt 18:15-17, on this subject, which is considered as a directory in cases of offenders: 'If thy brother trespass against thee, go and tell him his fault between him and thee alone; if he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother; but if he will not hear thee, then take with thee one or two more, that in the mouth of two or three witnesses, every word may be established,' &c. There is but one description of private offence to which this rule will properly apply, viz: Where the offender does not deny the charge, but pleads not guilty, upon the ground of there being no criminality attached to the action. But where the charge is denied, the rule above will not apply. For it is a principle laid down in the word of God, that no man shall be condemned, until he is proved guilty, and that by the testimony of at least two witnesses. See De 17:6; 19:15. 'One witness shall not rise up against a man for any iniquity, or for any sin that he sinneth; at the mouth of two witnesses, or at the mouth of three witnesses, shall the matter be established." Again Mt 18:16, and 2Co 13:14: 'In the mouth of two or three witnesses shall every word be established.' Now where the offence is of a private nature, if it should be brought into the Church, it would be impossible to establish the charge by the testimony required. Therefore, it would be improper in itself, as well as inconsistent with Gospel order, to bring it into the Church. The direction given by our Saviour is, 'If thy brother trespass against thee, go and tell him his fault alone.' But should you fail to reclaim him, other steps must be taken; and should he continue impenitent, he is at last to be brought before the Church; and should he refuse to hear the Church, he is to be expelled. Here the labors commence in private, but end in public excommunication.

"Now in this case, it appears that the trespass could not have been entirely of a private nature, (although private labors are required) because it is to be established in the Church, by the testimony of two or three witnesses, which would be impossible, unless there were witnesses present and if there were witnesses, it could not be a private offence; therefore, we are constrained to believe, that the rule laid down in the 18th of Matthew, as there stated, is only applicable to public offences, which can be supported by proper testimony. And that it is the duty of the Church, in all cases of public transgression, to use private labors, except in the case of the heinous offender, before excepted.

"But to make this subject as plain as possible, suppose A and B, members of the same church, and of equal respectability; A brings a charge of immorality against B, which charge is by B denied. A then takes with him C and D to labor with B, but the charge is still denied, and no satisfaction obtained. B is now to be brought before the Church. This is an illustration of what has been called Gospel steps, where in the first instance, the trespass was of a private nature.

"Here we have two members of equal standing, the one affirms, but the other denies. Now who is the Church to believe, or by what rule will she form a decision. To censure the accused, would be a violation of the word of God. For no man shall be condemned but by the testimony of two or three witnesses. As to the helps who were called in, they can prove nothing to the point; all they can testify is, that a contradiction existed between the two brethren. And as to the testimony of the accuser, it is quite insufficient; the solitary evidence of one man can never be admitted, according to the rule of the Divine word. Therefore, the Church will be bound in this case, to acquit or justify the accused member; the accuser not being able to make good his charge. In this case, it is to be understood, that there is no collateral or circumstantial evidence, by which the charge may be supported.

But what shall be done with the member who brought in the accusation? He must be considered in disorder, and fall under the censure of the Church, for slandering his brother. See Deut. xix: 19. 'After strict inquisition shall be made, and it shall apear to be a false accusation, then shall it be done unto him, as he had thought to have done unto his brother.'

"But suppose I see a member of the Church commit a sin which merits excommunication, and I go to him, and tell him his fault, and he should deny the fact, what am I to do, there being no witness to establish his guilt? In this case it will be your duty to testify against his wickedness, and endeavor to charge the sin upon his conscience; but should he remain impenitent, you are clear, for you have discharged your duty. His blood shall be upon his own head. And should he continue a member of the Church, and presume to partake at the Lord's table, the sin will be at his own door. But is it my duty, under these circumstances, to continue a member of the Church, and to partake with this disorderly person at the Lord's table? We conceive it to be your duty to continue in the Church, and to fill your seat in the house of God, and upon all convenient occasions to partake of the Lord's supper. For the word of God is the rule of your duty, and not the conduct of any man. You ought to remember that you commune with Christ and his Church, and not with this disorderly person, whose sin you have borne a faithful testimony against." 

1810

In Oct., the fourth session was held at Ebenezer, Amite county, in which nine Churches were represented, viz: Salem, Newhope, Bayou Sara, New Providence, Ebenezer, Morgan's Fork, Bayou Pierre, East Fork and Middle Fork—the aggregate strength 277 members— 24.87 sent up by the churches—appointed four union meetings—agreed to open a correspondence with the Georgia Baptist Association, and the Cumberland Association, and that brother T. Mercer write to the former, and brother D. Cooper to the latter.

Extract.—"Be it known to the public in general, and all christian societies in particular, that John Wood, formerly a Baptist minister, in the month of January last, was expelled from the Baptist denomination."

Query from the Bayou Pierre church.—Is the washing the saints' feet a christian duty?*

Answered in the affirmative.

1811

In October, "The Association convened at New Hope, Adams county

The introductory sermon was preached by brother John Atkins, from Jud. i: 3.—'Earnestly contend for the faith once delivered to the saints.'

Letters from nine churches were read, and the names of the delegates enrolled.

Brother Thomas Mercer was chosen Moderator, and brother David Cooper, Clerk.

Read the rules of decorum adopted by this association.

The following churches applied, by letter and delegates, for admission into the Association: The church on Tancipiho, the church at Shiloh, and the church at Zion Hill, which were accordingly received.

Received a letter of correspondence from the Cumberland Association.

This is the only instance in which the subject is named.

The Circular Letter was read, and submitted to T. Mercer, M. Hadley and D. Cooper, for correction.

The same were appointed to preach on Sunday.

Monday morning, the Circular Letter was called for, read and received.

The petition from a number of brethren on Bogue Chitto, praying to be constituted into a church, was received. Brother T. Mercer and D. Cooper, were appointed to visit them, and, if they deem it expedient, to constitute them into a church.

Query from Ebenezer Church.—How should a church act that has an ordained minister among them, and who refuses to preach?

Answer.—We advise the church at Ebenezer to call in help to assist them in their difficulties.

On motion,

Resolved, That we think it expedient and necessary to appoint supplies to the destitute churches. Supplies for New Hope and Ebenezer churches: Brother Mercer to attend the first Saturday and Sunday in December at Ebenezer, and the third Saturday and Sunday in January at New Hope. Brother Hadley the first Saturday and Sunday in January at Ebenezer, and the third Saturday and Sunday in February, at New Hope. Brother Scarbrough, the second Saturday and Sunday in Dec, at New Hope. Brother Slocumb, the third Saturday and Sunday in November, at New Hope, and the first Saturday and Sunday in February at Ebenezer. Brother Atkins, the third Saturday and Sunday in March, at New Hope, Brother Cooper, the first Saturday and Sunday in March at Ebenezer, and the third Saturday and Sunday in April, at New Hope.

Appointed six union meetings, to be held at particular times and places the ensuing year.

The following brethren were appointed to write to the corresponding Associations: J. Atkins, to Hepzibah; T. Mercer, to the Georgia; D. Cooper, to the Cumberland; and M. Hadley, to the Savannah.

Brother Hadley appointed to write a Circular Letter for the next year.

Brother D. Cooper, to preach the next introductory sermon; in case of failure, L. Scarborough.

EXTRACT FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER.

"These words contain more proofs than one; first, from the perpetuity of this covenant, which is not of works, promising life founded on obedience; for then, indeed, their perseverance would be precarious; but it is of grace, sovereign and free, and so is a better covenant, established on better promises, not depending upon creative acts, but runs thus—' I will and they shall;'—a covenant well ordered in all things, nothing wanting which would be conducive to the welfare and happiness of the saints, containing all spiritual blessings for time and eternity, in both grace and glory, and therefore said to be sure: Its blessings are the sure mercies of David; its promises are yea and amen in Christ, and the whole is ratified and confirmed by the blood of the Son of God, and sure to all the spiritual seed—a covenant not made with them as considered in themselves, but with Christ as their head, and with them in him, and which will stand firm forever more. It is an everlasting covenant, flows from divine love, is founded on an eternal purpose, and consists of promises which God made before the world began, and of grace given in Christ, who was set up from everlasting as the mediator of it. It is said of those who are begotten again into a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ, that they are kept by the power of God, through faith, unto salvation.—1Pe 1:5. They are kept in the love of God, in the covenant of grace, in the hands of Christ, and on him the sure foundation, in a state of grace, both of sanctification and justification. They are kept in the paths of truth and holiness; also, from the destructive power of Satan, and from being finally carried away by the destructive errors of false teachers. Therefore, they shall never perish, but Christ will raise them up at the last day.

"Again. It is written: 'I am the Lord, I change not, therefore, ye sons of Jacob are not consumed.' Now, if the true believer should finally perish or be consumed, God must change in his love toward them, in his purposes and designs concerning them, and in His promises of grace made to them; and His blessings of grace bestowed on them must be reversed, which is impossible; for he will not alter the thing that has gone out of his mouth, nor change his mind; for he is of one mind, and who can turn him? The doctrine of the saints' final perseverance in grace, establishes the unchangeableness of God; but the contrary doctrine makes him changeable in his nature, will and grace, and reflects dishonor on Him with whom there is no variableness, no shadow of turning.

"The wisdom of God, which is displayed in all His works of nature, providence and grace, appears very conspicuous in this doctrine; which would not be the case, if any of the Lord's people should perish. No wise man, who has an end in view, but will devise and make use of proper means; and, if in his power, to make them effectual to accomplish the end. The end which God has in view is the salvation of his people; and it is inconsistent with his wisdom, to appoint means which will prove ineffectual, seeing it is completely in His power, to make them effectual to the accomplishing the end.

"God has appointed His Son as the author of this salvation, which he has wrought out by his obedience, suffering and death—and that for his people; and has appointed, as the means of their enjoying it, the sanctification of the spirit and belief of the truth; for which purpose he sends his spirit to sanctify and work faith in them, whereby these means become effectual and the end is accomplished.

"Here we see the wisdom of God highly displayed and glorified. But where would be his wisdom to appoint a people to salvation and not save them? to send His Son to redeem them, and never be the better of it? to send His spirit into them to begin a good work, and not complete it? But this is not the case; for he has put the work of redemption into the hands of His Son, by whom it has been completed, and assigned the work of sanctification, in its beginning, progress and issue, to the agency of the Holy Spirit, who is adequate to it, and by whom it will be effected.

"In the work of salvation there is an eminent and glorious display of Divine power. Those who are elected according to the foreknowledge of God, and regenerated by the operation of the Divine spirit, are kept by the power of God, through faith, unto salvation; so that they shall never perish, but be everlastingly saved.

"Brethren, we are obliged to believe, that inasmuch as God sent his Son into the world to save his people from their sins, that he has a people whom he designs to save.

Now, if any of those whom God designs to save should be finally lost, he must either change his mind, or else he has not power to accomplish his designs—the supposition of which we consider blasphemy. * * * *

"Having established the doctrine of the final perseverance of the saints in grace, we shall conclude this letter, by just observing, that when this doctrine is properly understood, and received by a living faith, it is so far from producing licentiousness, that it fills the soul with humble gratitude and lively praise to him who hath loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood.'"

1812

In Oct., the Association convened at Zion Hill, Amite county—14 churches represented.

Received a petition from a number of brethren on the Tangipiho, praying to be constituted into a church, and brethren Courtney and Wall were appointed to attend them.

1813

In October, the Association convened at Bayou Pierre, Claiborne county—18 churches represented.

Query from two churches. — "What course shall a church take when an excommunicated person from a distant church applies for fellowship?

Answer.—In all such cases churches must act discretionally.

The union meetings to be discontinued." (No cause given.)

1813.—EXTRACT FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER.

"War, it is readily conceded, is one of the greatest human calamities. It should never be entered into but upon principles, and from motives, that there is the clearest evidence the God of love and peace will approve. Then, indeed, it should be met with alacrity, and prosecuted with energy, as a means of speedily restoring the blessings of peace. History proves that a nation can be in no situation more dangerous than that of war, when it is conducted with languor and supineness. A pause, but a mometary pause, in its prosecution, endangers the vitals of freedom. Like commerce, war has its attendant train of vices to be carefully guarded against. From the aspect of the times, we all appear imperatively called upon to befound in the prompt discharge of all the duties of citizens and of Christians.

******

"This brethren, is not a war of passion and of mad ambition on our part. Deeply do we sympathize with many of the virtuous subjects of the government our country is contending against. We lament, with genuine sorrow of soul, the individual miseries that it will probably occasion, the useful and valuable lives that will be sacrificed, the many amiable and worthy characters that probably will, in consequence thereof, go with lacerated hearts to the grave. These reflections affect us deeply— but in the eye of Eternal Justice we stand acquitted of producing this evil—it devolves on the head of the aggressor."  ******

1814

In Oct., the Association convened at Shiloh, Wilkinson county—18 churches represented. Brother Howell Wall, according to appointment, preached the introductory sermon from Joh 3:36.

"The articles of faith and rules of decorum were read.

"On motion, a committee was appointed, of Jacob Cobb, Josiah Flowers, and B. E. Chany, to name six days in the year to be kept by our churches, as days of fasting, humiliation and prayer, and to be continued during the war in which our nation is involved.

"On motion,

Resolved,, That it be recommended to, and enjoined on, the preachers of our order, that they use the utmost diligence in the practice of itinerant preaching; taking into view the case of destitute churches and settlements, both in our territory and West Florida, whose language is, 'Come over and help us.'

Brother William Cooper was appointed to preach the next introductory sermon—and in case of failure, brother Nathan Morris.

A letter was received from sundry members on Cedar Creek, requesting that ministers be sent to them for the purpose of constituting a church. Whereupon, brethren Allen and Morris were requested to visit them, and comply with their wishes, if deemed expedient and proper.

1815

In Oct., the Association convened at Sarepta church, Jefferson county—24 churches represented.

Question.—"That in certain cases where two ministers should be called by a church to assist in the ordination of a minister, and it should afterwards appear, that one of said ministers was not at the time in good standing, as an orderly member of any church, shall the ordination of the minister to be ordained be considered valid?—and on the question being taken, it was carried in the affirmative.

"The two letters from Salem Church were called for and read, and after due deliberation it was

Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to sit forthwith and hear the evidence respecting the difficulties existing in said church, and make report of their views on the subject.

"Whereupon brethren Wm. Allen, Wm. Cooper, Jacob Cobb, Thos. Cason and Harman Runnels, were chosen in conformity with the foregoing resolution.

"The Half— Moon Bluff church made a request that this Association would advise, as to what would be their duty to do, respecting Robert Smith, who makes confession of his disorderly conduct, and shows marks of repentance sufficient to satisfy them, as to the propriety of receiving him as a private member, but have doubts whether he should be restored by them to the exercise of his public gift, without the advice of the Association. Whereupon, it was agreed that the Church has a right to restore him to fellowship, and leave him to act as it respects his public gift, as God and his own conscience may direct—and have appointed brethren Thomas Mercer, Ezra Courtney and Lawrence Scarborough, to act with them as helps, on the Friday before the first Sabbath in December next, to decide on the propriety of said Smith.

"A letter from the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions for the United States, was received and read; in which they solicit this Association, and the churches connected herewith, to contribute to aid them in raising funds for the purpose of sending missionaries to preach the Gospel to the heathen nations; and that a standing Secretary of this Association be appointed with whom they will correspond; and to whom they will forward their reports. Whereupon, brother Wm. Snodgrass was chosen to act in that capacity; and it is the wish of this Association, that the churches may contribute as liberally as they may find it convenient, and forward the same to our next annual meeting; also, that our ministering brethren endeavor to explain and further the views of said Board of Missions in the best manner they possibly can, and receive contributions from such persons as may be disposed to favor that great and blessed work; and that they preserve an account of the names and sums annexed, to be presented at our next meeting.

"On motion.

Resolved, That twenty dollars from our Association fund heretofore raised, and all the money received at this meeting, after paying for printing the minutes, be forwarded, by our Secretary, to the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions."

"Brother Nathan Morris is appointed to preach the introductory sermon at our next annual meeting, and in case of failure, Brother William Whitehead.

Extract From the Circular Letter

"Brethren, you have long been praying for the destruction of anti— Christ, for the fullness of the Gentiles, for the calling in of the Jews, and for the spread of the Gospel, with the fulfillment of that prophesy which assures us that the knowledge of the Lord shall cover the earth. What think you of the signs of the times? This is certainly an eventful period. Our God is pouring out the vials of his wrath, and shaking terribly the nations of the earth; while many are purified and made white, many are running to and fro, and knowledge is increasing. We have reason to believe, that a glorious change is about to take place in the moral and political world; for the kingdoms of this world must become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ. Brethren, Christians of the Mississippi Territory, how do you feel? More than an ordinary portion of zeal has latterly manifested itself among modern Christians in many parts. Bible societies have been, and are now, forming throughout Christendom, for the diffusion of divine knowledge; while the missionary spirit has been revived, and is gaining ground in every direction. In a short time, we have reason to hope that the word of the Lord will be known from the rising of the sun to the going down thereof; for the Gospel of His kingdom must be preached unto all nations for a witness unto them. Our missionary brethren in India, with proper encouragement, will shortly have the Scriptures translated in twenty— seven different languages; which will enable about three hundred millions of poor benighted heathens, who are perishing for lack of knowledge, to read the precious word of God, which is able to make them wise unto salvation.

"Brethren, who will arise and come to the help of the Lord against the mighty? If your zeal is cold and languid, we trust the example of ancient and modern saints will have the necessary influence on your minds; that it will provoke you to love and good works. But are you ready to say, what can we do? You can do much. There is not a worthy member of Christ's militant church, but may be useful. By their example and prayer, with the contribution of a very small part of their wealth, great good may be done. You are entitled to the honor of being workers together with Christ; and, if you can't preach and exhort, you can, by your liberality, assist those who are engaged in the work of the ministry. Godly zeal will induce you to make many sacrifices, to suffer many privations, and to forego many inconveniences, that you may promote the interest of religion, and the salvation of God's elect."

1816

In October, the Association convened at Clear Creek, Adams county—30 churches represented.

Brother Nathan Morris, preached the introductory sermon.

Brother Nathan Morris was chosen Moderator, and brother Wm. Snodgrass, Clerk.

Brother Wm. Snodgrass presented a Circular Letter from the corresponding secretary of the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, which was read, and also a receipt of the Vice— President of said Board for the following sums, sent from this Association, and from individuals— amounting to $83.93.

Query.—Is it best to have church conferences in public or private?

Answer.—In public.

Resolved, That all the funds collected at this Association be forwarded, by our standing secretary, to the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions. (The amount not given.)

Extract From the Circular Letter

* * * * "You will please again to consider the direful effects of flattery in church discipline; and while some are striving to sweep the house of God from disorders, others will stand up, and, through flattery, will strive to make a bad cause good; and, in their turn, will strive to reduce mountains to mole— hills, and again, will strive to swell mole— hills to mountains, and hereby, flattery and plausible pretensions, will lead the simple astray.  *  *  ******  *  *  *  *

"These things are matters of lamentation, if true; and whether they are facts or not, we leave general observation to determine. These hints strike not against the faithful, but the false, deceiving flatterers. And now, dear brethren, suffer a word of exhortation. We exhort you to abandon every kind of flattery, and in truth, faithfulness, and sincerity, keep up a regular and strict discipline in your churches, and you will soon find your difficulties disappear; your church tremblers will be made manifest, and be censured, and bear their own shame before the church and the world."

1817

In October, the Association convened at Bogue Chitto, Pike county—36 churches represented.

Eld. D. Cooper, chosen Moderator; Eld. B. Davis, Clerk.

Eld. James A. Ranaldson, missionary, being present, was invited by the Moderator, to take a seat in the Association.

Resolved, unanimously. That a summary of church discipline be published for the use of the churches; and that Elders D. Cooper, J. A. Ronaldson, and M. Hadly be a committee to compile a Discipline, and present to the next Association, for inspection and adoption.

Resolved, unanimously. That this Association recommend and support a plan for raising a fund, for the special purpose of promoting the proper education of pious men called to the great and important work of the Gospelministry.

"Our brethren, David Cooper, James A. Ronaldson and Benjamin Davis were appointed a committee to prepare and report a plan of education on to— morrow.

"To prevent imposition on the religious community,

Resolved, That certain imposters, under the names of Samuel T. Council and John W. Carry, be advertized in our Minutes."

Tuesday, Oct. 21.—"The committee appointed for the purpose, reported a plan of Education, and presented a short address to the churches on the subject, which was approved and accepted. In consideration of which, it was agreed:

1st. That a special committee of seven be appointed for one year, who shall be invested with right and authority to solicit subscriptions and donations for the education fund; to judge and determine of the moral character, piety, gifts, and graces of those who may apply for the benefit of this fund; to accept such as may be deemed worthy, and are called of God to preach the Gospel; also, to conduct and superintend their education; and to defray all necessary expenses out of the funds collected for that purpose.

2nd. That this special committee draft a constitution and by— laws, to present for inspection at the next Association.

3rd. That the respective churches of our order be recommended to contribute, yearly, to the education fund, by the hands of their delegates.

4th. That the address to the churches, prepared and presented by the committee, be substituted for our circular, and printed with the minutes.

Elders D. Cooper, J. A. Ronaldson, G. W. King, E. Courtney, L. Scarborough, B. Davis, and brother Wm. Snodgrass, were appointed the special committee of the Association, to manage the affairs of Education, as specified in the preceding articles.

"After some free conversation on the subject of Foreign and Domestic Missions, deeply interesting to this body, it was agreed, that our brethren, Thomas Mercer and Benjamin Davis, be requested to visit the Creek Indians, to enquire what can be done towards the establishment of schools, and the introduction of the Gospel among them."

Address on Ministerial Education

"Beloved brethren: Education is the subject to which we now invite your attention. This, next to the Gospel, is our choice theme. After religion, it is of the highest importance to the world.

"Philosophers, who know how much literature is indebted to Christianity, must value the glorious Gospel of the blessed God. Christians, who know how much education has contributed to the furtherance of the Gospel, must appreciate learning. The one is auxiliary to the other; and both are connected with the glory and happiness of man. Then let not the unsanctified philosopher spurn religion as opposed to reason; let not the bigoted Christian despise learning as incompatible with religion. Too, many, alas! are unacquainted with the excellency of the one; too many ignorant of the utility of the other.

"It is, however, with great joy we now behold churches arising in various parts of our goodly land; schools and colleges will also arise, as the hand— maids of knowledge and virtue. These, united, will make a land happy, and a nation exalted. These, separated, will lead to ignorance and profligacy.

"Although we do not consider a classical education absolutely essential to the qualifications of an evangelical preacher, yet "he shall not be a novice." It is the first principle of the oracles of God that they be able to teach. They should be apt to communicate their ideas with sound speech, that cannot be condemned. The words of the wise should be delivered with the tongue of the learned: that being fitly spoken, they may shine as apples of gold in pictures of silver.

"Literature is now in a state of improvement in our country. It is, therefore, the more important and desirable that those who are set for the defence of the Gospel, as the public teachers of morality and religion, should keep pace with the progress of their disciples, that they may continue to be acceptable preachers in their respective congregations.

"We perceive some of our dear young brethren, called to this great work, this most dignified station, who, though they possess amiable graces, and promising gifts, yet, for the want of education, are doomed to labor under many disadvantages, while contending with learned infidels, and unmerciful critics. It is desirable that the student of divinity should be able to search the original text in Hebrew and Greek; and the practical preacher should be able to deliver his sermons with boldness without arrogance, with sound doctrine, with gramatical correctness, with logical strength, with elegance of rhetoric, and with simplicity of truth.

"Desirous to assist the student in the attainment of these objects, so far as practicable, under the auspices of Heaven, we have appointed a committee, as you will see in our minutes, for the purpose of soliciting donations for an education fund; to accept qualified candidates for the benefit of this fund, and to superintend their education.

"We now earnestly recommend to the respective churches we have the honor to represent in these States, to send their voluntary contributions annually, as God may prosper them, whether little or much, to be appropriated to this particular use. God will accept your free will offering; and when we shall be removed from among you, and you will no more hear our stammering tongues, our successors, we hope, may be more able ministers of the New Testament; who shall come to you, not with the doctrine of vain philosophy, and with the enticing word of man's wisdom, but with the pure doctrines of grace, delivered with the perspicuity of sanctified learning, in the clear demonstration of the spirit, and in power, and fraught with the fullness of the blessings of the Gospel.

1818

 In Oct., the Association convened at New Providence church, Amite county—40 churches represented.

Eld. Josiah Flowers preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. D. Cooper, chosen Moderator, and Wm. Snodgrass, Clerk.

"Letters from the corresponding Secretary of the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions were received by the hand of our clerk, accompanied by a copy of their fourth annual report, for each church connected with the Association.

Resolved, therefore. That the thanks of this body be expressed for the kind attention of the Board, in making these valuable and pleasing communications.

Communications from the Secretary of the Board of Directors of the Baptist Mission Society, of Kentucky, were received, which contained information of great importance relative to the most efficient plans for aboriginal reform; in consideration of which, it is resolved, unanimously, that the Association heartily concur in the views of the Board, and that a suitable memorial, representing the deplorable condition of the Indian tribes within the limits of the United States, be prepared and sent to Congress at the ensuing session, signed by the Moderator and Clerk, in behalf of this Association.

"A summary of church discipline, presented by the Moderator, prepared by a committee of the last Association, consisting of brethren D. Cooper, M. Hadley and James A. Ranaldson, was received and read, and with some alteration it was agreed, that it should be recommended to the churches as a proper system of rules for their government." (Form not given.)

"In compliance with a resolution of the last Association, a committee, consisting of brethren James A. Ranaldson, D. Cooper, G. W. King, E. Courtney, L. Scarborough, B. Davis and W. Snodgrass, reported a constitution for the Missisippi Baptist Education Society, which was read, approved, adopted, and is as follows:

1.    The society shall be styled "The Mississippi Baptist Education Society."

2.    The avowed and determined object of this society shall be to assist pious, evangelical young men, called to the work of the Gospel ministry, in receiving a literary and theological education.

3.    This society shall consist of the delegates and messengers of such churches and associations as contribute yearly to the fund, and of such persons as shall subscribe to this constitution, and pay into the treasury a sum not less than two dollars annually. Fifty dollars at one time shall constitute a member for life; subject, however, to the rules and regulations of the society.

4.    This society shall have a President, Secretary, Treasurer, and ten trustees, to be elected triennially by the society. These officers shall constitute the executive committee, to conduct the whole concerns of the institution; five of whom, including the President, shall make a quorum, to do business at any regular meeting of the committee, duly notified by the Secretary. The committee shall be authorized to fill any vacancy occasioned, by death or otherwise, between the annual meetings of the society.

5.    None shall receive the bounty at any time, but such as give satisfactory evidence of gracious experience, sound faith in the doctrines of the Gospel, good moral character, promising talent, and a Divine call to the work of the ministry.

6.The secretary shall keep a record of all the proceedings of the society and the committee, open at all times to the inspection of the members.

7.    The Treasurer shall give competent security to the committee for the fund in his care; the whole or any part of which he shall be ready at all times to deliver to the order of the committee. It shall also be his duty to report a specific account of the State of the funds, audited by the Secretary at each meeting.

8.    No moneys shall, at any time, be paid out of the treasury, but by a written order of the committee, signed by the President and Secretary.

9.    The annual meetings of the society shall be held at the time and place of the meeting of the Mississippi Baptist Association.

10.This constitution shall be subject to any alterations which experience may prove necessary, by the concurrence of two— thirds of the members present at an annual meeting.

"The following brethren were appointed officers and trustees of the Mississippi Baptist Education Society, for three years, viz: David Cooper, President; James A. Ranaldson, Secretary; Bartlett Collins, Treasurer; Davis Collins, George W. King, Ezra Courtney, William Erwin, John Smith, Shadrack King, Jacob Buckholts, Joel Glass, William Grammond, William Snodgrass, trustees.

"Resolved, That the churches be recommended to have a sermon preached in each year, with a special relation to missionary concerns, and at the same time make a collection for the support of missionaries, and on forwarding the money to this Association, state whether the contribution was for Foreign or Domestic Missions.

Query from the Bayou Pierre Church.—Should a brother be held in fellowship, who prefers the rights and privileges of the Masonic Lodge to the communion of his church?

Answer.—No.

1819

In October, the Association convened at Hepzibah church, Feliciana parish, La.—33 churches represented— 8 churches not represented—being 41 in all.

Eld. D. Cooper, chosen Moderator, and Wm. Snodgrass, Clerk.

Elders Charles Felder, David Cooper and Samuel Marsh preached on Sunday, and G. W. King closed by exhortation.

"The churches are requested to beware of W. White, who calls himself a Baptist preacher."

On motion.

Resolved, That each of our messengers, above named, shall receive out of our Association fund, fifteen dollars, for travelling expenses (to an Association West of Mississippi river.)

"Contributed for Foreign Missions.—Antioch Church $21,75 Hepzibah Church SI 50.

Extract From the Circular Letter

"We beseech you, brethren, in the name of Jesus, for the honor of God, and for the advancement of his blessed cause in the world, if you sustain the character of a master, that you govern with moderation, with gentleness, and with meekness of wisdom—always keep in view, that you have a Master in Heaven, to whom you are accountable for your stewardship.'

1820

In October, the Association convened at Zion Hill church, Amite county—26 churches represented—7 not represented—being 33 in all, after dismissing 8, at last session, for the purpose of forming the Union Association.

"Brother Marsh was appointed Moderator, and brother Andrews, Clerk.

"The Association was highly gratified in the attendance of Messengers from the Union, Bigby and Louisiana Associations, bearing letters of correspondence.

"Queries from Zion Hill.—Has a church any claim on an excommunicated person?

Answer.—None.

Shall a church be deemed censurable, in a reception of an individual excluded from any sister church?

Answer.—The excommunicated person should give suitable satisfaction to the church, which excluded him, before he can be consistently received by a sister church.

"Recommended and unanimously agreed, that our faithful brethren Samuel Marsh and James A. Ranaldson, visit all the churches of this Association in the ensuing year.

Resolved, That it be earnestly recommended to our sister Association, that we meet annually, by delegates appointed in one general meeting, for the purpose of corresponding, and of eliciting the energies of the whole, in aid of the missionary cause, and other benevolent and evangelical objects. Also, that any collections made from individuals or churches, especially for the Mission or Education Society, be transmitted by the hands of their delegates respectively, to the funds of these societies. It is further recommended, that this general meeting of the Association be held at the time and place of the meeting of the Mississippi Missionary Society, so as to unite and concentrate the whole in the best and most efficient endeavors to propagate the Gospel at home and abroad.

"Pursuant to the foregoing resolution, brethren D. Cooper, S. Marsh, J. A. Ranaldson, E. Courtney and H. Wall, were appointed as our delegates, to convene with other delegates at the next meeting of the Missionary Society, to be held at Zion Hill, on Friday, before the first Lord's day in May ensuing.

"Agreed, that the several contributions from the churches, for minutes and other purposes, be formed into one fund.

1821

n October, the Association convened at Bethel, Wilkinson county—16 churches represented—having dismissed 14 at last session, to form the Pearl River Association.

Eld. Samuel Marsh, chosen Moderator.

Appointed a committee to prepare corresponding letters to the Union, Pearl River, Louisiana and Bigby Associations.

"Received an affectionate and encouraging letter from the Board of Foreign Missions, with the intention of which we desire to be united in heart and exertion.

"Agreed, that brethren Marsh, Ranaldson, Smith, Cooper and Estes, be our messengers to the next annual meeting of the Mississippi Society for Baptist Missions, to meet at Zion Hill, on Friday before the first Lord's day in May, 1822.

"On motion,

Resolved, That the first day of January ensuing be observed with fasting and prayer for the enlargement of the Redeemer's kingdom.

"Now in the Treasurer's hands $30 25. In the Clerk's hands for the payment of printing, $38 37."

Extract From the Circular Letter.

Written by James A. Ranaldson, Missionary

"Come, let us follow on to know the Lord; and as we are called to walk mournfully before him, let us pry into the nature of those evils which mar the beauty of Zion.

"And, first of all, may we not suspect covetousness as one of the aggravating sins of the age. * * * *

Evil Speaking.—"This crime is the bane of society. The ignorant speak evil against others, because they know nothing. They have not resources for conversation in science, literature or religion, and they must talk. Children lisp in slander because they are imitative animals, and they learn sad stories from indiscreet parents. Slaves deal and traffic in misrepresentation, because they love bribery and seek revenge."

1822

In October, the Association convened at Ebenezer, Amite county—churches not given.

"The committee of finance received the collections, audited the Treasurer's accounts, and reported a balance of $85 37 in the treasury.

"Brethren S. Marsh, J. A. Ranaldson, Wm. Balfour, C. Felder and D. Cooper, were appointed Messengers to the Missionary meeting to be holden at Zion Hill meeting house, Amite county, on Friday before the first Sunday in July, 1823.

1823

In October, the Association convened at Mars Hill, Amite county—14 churches represented.

"Resolved, unanimously. That we concur with the Pearl River and Union Associations, in appointing faithful brethren to assist in forming a constitution, for the more systematic and efficient appropriation of your talents in the great concerns of religion; and that D. Cooper, E. Estes, J. A. Irion, J. Smith, E. Courtney, S. Marsh, and C. Felder, be our delegates to meet those of the other Associations, at Bogue Chitto church, Pike county, on Saturday before the third Lord's day in February, 1824.

Agreed, that Eld. J. Smith be requested to write our next circular address; and that the subject be 'The high responsibility and criminality of those who do not contribute, according to their circumstances, to the cause of religion in general.'

"The Association fund was eighty— three dollars."

1824

 In October, the Association convened at New Providence, Amite county—17 churches represented.

Eld. D. Cooper chosen Moderator, and E. Estes, Clerk.

"Agreed, that our delegates to the next meeting of the State Convention, be D. Cooper, E. Courtney, E. Estes, S. Marsh, G. A. Irion, C. Felder, and W. Balfour; and that this Association loan the Convention all their unappropriated funds for the promoting of Domestic Missions.

"After a settlement with the treasurer, the funds of the Association, amounted to $82 33."

Extract From the Circular Letter

"Remember that God has no less ordained the means of accomplishing, than the end to be accomplished. The gold and silver are his, he has committed them to you, care, to be used at his direction; and if you do not faithfully discharge the trust committed to you, he may say to you "Give account of thy stewardship, for thou mayst no longer be steward.  ********

"We need men trained, by every rule of Heavenly discipline, to the sacred warfare. Men who are thoroughly armed, and able to carry the assault to the very gate of the enemy, to storm his garrison, and drive him from his last entrenchment. But where are these men to be found? Are we to sit down in careless unconcern and wait the Lord's time? And do we thus act in our worldly concerns? We have equally a duty to perform in both, and the criminality of neglecting either must be in proportion to its importance.

1825

In October, the Association convened at Shiloh church, Wilkinson county—churches not given.

"Delegates to the next State convention, appointed brethren Cooper, Ranaldson, Marsh, Balfour, Felder, Cain, Courtney and Andrews.

"A circular having been received from the Baptist General Convention and read before the Association,

Resolved, That the Association feel a deep and lively interest in the great objects recommended by the General Convention, and most cordially pray for their success; but at present, we find all the pecuniary efforts we can make, as a body, are imperiously demanded within our own boundaries.

"The contributions for Missionary purposes having been unintentionally omitted on yesterday, an opportunity was offered, at this stage when the very liberal sum of 90 dollars was taken up for that pious object."

1826

In October, the Association convened at Hepzibah, East Feliciana, La.—16 churches represented.

"The Lord's day was employed in public worship. After the sermon, a collection was taken in aid of domestic missions, which amounted to $110 75. This sum was ordered to be paid over to the Treasurer of the Mississippi Baptist State Convention, to be judiciously applied to the objects designated.

"The Constitution, Articles of Faith, &c, were read,

"Appointed as delegates to the Mississippi Baptist State Convention brethren Ranaldson, Balfour, Felder, Erwin, Cain, J. Walker and J. Mumford."

1827

In October, the Association convened at Woodville, "Wilkinson county—15 churches represented—18 in all.

Brother Charles Felder chosen Moderator, and C. G. Hatch, Clerk.

"Elders Courtney, Ranaldson, Andrews, Felder, Irion, Cain and Creath, were appointed to attend the State Convention.

"Brethren Walker, Quin and Mumford were appointed a committee of finance, and reported that, after the current expenses of the last year, they found in the hands of the Treasurer $29 75, and that the amount of contributions this year was $58 87, which sums added, make $88 62, now in the hands of the Treasurer."

1828

In October, the Association convened at Zion Hill church, Amite county.

Eld. C. Felder chosen Moderator, and J. A. Ranaldson, Clerk.

"Courtney, Felder, Cain, Matthews, Robinson, Paxton and Ranaldson, were appointed delegates to the Mississippi Baptist State Convention.

"The committee on the Treasurer's account reported that the contributions from the churches this year are $60 62—the balance of last year, in the treasury, $53 62— total $114 25.

"On motion,

Resolved, unanimously. That a collection be taken on Lord's day, at our annual meetings, for the support of Home Missions, under the patronage of the Mississippi Baptist State Convention—and that it be earnestly recommended to our churches and congregations to take a collection at least once a year for the same object.

"The collection was taken up by E. Courtney, for Domestic Missions, which amounted to $93 37, and was ordered to be transmitted by the delegates to the Mississippi Baptist State Convention.

 

1829

In October, the Association convened at Jerusalem, Amite county—churches not given.

Eld. E. Courtney chosen Moderator, and J. A. Ranaldson, Clerk.

"T. Swearingen, Robertson, Courtney, Felder, Cain, Mercer and Robertson, Messengers to the Mississippi Baptist State Convention.

"E. Courtney was requested to take a collection tomorrow for Home Missions.

"Resolved, That this Association accept, with pleasure, the generous offer of the 'Baptist General Tract Society,' to receive a parcel of their tracts—and that brother D. Cooper be requested to act as our agent at Natchez, and to correspond with the society.

Query from New Hope.—"Has a church the power of ordaining a pastor or elder, without calling the assistance of an elder or elders from another church or churches?

Answer—No.

"Lord's day a contribution was raised for Home Missions, amounting to $66.

1830

In October, the Association convened at Ebenezer, Amite county—19 churches represented.

Eld. E. Courtney was chosen Moderator, and brother Cain, Clerk.

"The Articles of Faith, Rules of Decorum, and the Powers of the Association were read by the Moderator.

"Corresponding letters to sister Associations were read and received, and messengers appointed, viz: Brethren Courtney and Ranaldson, to the Leaf River; Felder and Mercer, to the Union; Cain and Beavers, to the Pearl River; and Ranaldson to address a letter of correspondence to the Louisiana Association.

"Resolved, That it be recommended to all the churches composing this Association, to discountenance the writings of Alexander Campbell—and the new translation of the New Testament— — and any minister who holds to the Campbellite creed.

On motion,

Resolved, That the query of last year from Salem church be considered, viz: What will amount to heresy in a Baptist church, in a scriptural point of view?

Answer.—A departure from any Gospel doctrine is heresy, according to the Scriptures—the Baptist believing that their faith is in strict conformity to the Scriptures, whatever is contrary to their faith is heresy to them.

"Brother Mercer informed the Association that he had in the past year, travelled in the southern boundary of this body 97 days, in which time he rode about 670 miles, and preached to about 1800 persons, with apparent success.

"Resolved, That the Treasurer be authorized to pay to brother Mercer $37, for his missionary labors the past year.

"Resolved, That, instead of receiving a collection at our annual meetings, the churches be advised to send their contributions for Missions, by the hands of their delegates annually.

"Brethren C. Felder, J. Cain, and M. Robinson were appointed a standing committee until our next Association, to employ missionaries to labor in the limits of this body, and visit destitute churches.

"On motion,

Resolved, That our messengers to sister Associations be allowed 50 cents per day, to defray travelling expenses."

1831

In October, the Association convened at New Providence, Amite county—18 churches represented— 19 in all.

"Two letters were presented, as being from Shiloh church. On investigation it was unanimously agreed, that the one presented by Charles Edwards and John Tison, was the letter from Shiloh church.

"Corresponding Messengers.—D. Collins, S. Coker and J. Crawford, from Pearl River; N. Morris and J. Burch, from Union; J. Hill, from Louisiana. A letter and minutes from Leaf River.

"Resolved, That brother E. Courtney receive $50, and brother C. Felder $29 50, for missionary services.

"Resolved, That, in the future, all corresponding messengers receive the sum of one dollar per day while necessarily absent.

"Resolved, That this Association withdraw her fellowship from W. E. Matthews and David Hughes, as men having apostatized from our failh and order, and having created disturbances in our churches.

"Resolved, That a public collection be taken to— morrow for local missionary purposes.

"Resolved, That T. Swearingen, T. Goode and T. R. Cheatham, be a committee for local missionary purposes."

"The Missionary fund was $165 12—$72 12 of which was received from the estate of Dr. Cooper.

The appropriations were as follows: By cash paid A. Mercer, at the last Association for missionary services, $37; E. Courtney, $50; C. Felder $29 50. Total $116 50. Balance $48 62.

Ezra Courtney, Moderator

1832

In October, the Association convened at Mount Nebo church, La.—16 churches represented.

"Brother C. Felder chosen Moderator, and brother D. Lea, Clerk.

"Corresponding Messengers.—Pearl River Association, D. Collins, J. Crawford: Leaf River, T. C. Hunt; Union, J. T. Fairchild and J. E. Bailey.

"Resolved, That T. R. Cheatham, John Jenkins and W. Knight be, and are hereby, appointed a committee to employ a suitable Baptist Minister to ride and preach under their direction, within the limits of this Association; and it shall be the duty of any preacher, thus employed, to certify to the committee, the number of days they have served, sermons preached, and places where; on which certificate, it shall be the duty of the committee to give a draft on the Treasurer, to pay said preacher, at the rate of one dollar per day, out of any funds he may have in his hands for missionary purposes."

"Association fund $39 56—due from former Treasurer $101 12—contributions from the churches $55.37. Total $196 06.

"Paid to Messengers—E. Courtney, $13; A. Cotton, $11;

C.Felder, $9; J. Cain, $10; R. Quin, $9. For printingminutes $50. Balance in hands of Treasurer $94 06.

"Missionary Fund.—Public collection at the Association, on Lord's day, $58 87—in the hands of Treasurer, $48 62; from Mount Zion church $3 50. Total $111.

1833

 In October, the Association convened at Hepzibah meeting house.

"Brother Ezra Courtney chosen Moderator, and brother D.Lea, Clerk.

"A letter of correspondence and a package of minutes were received from the Yazoo Baptist Association.

"Brethren T. R. Cheatham, W. Wright and M. Seal, were appointed to employ ministers to ride and preach the ensuing year."

"Resolved, unanimously. That this Association discountenance and will not fellowship, or knowingly commune, with any church or individual member, who holds to the doctrines or dogmas held by the Christian Baptists, alias, the Campbellites; and also, those held by elder Parker, alias, the two seed doctrine, so far as relates to the eternal existence of the Devil, and his being literally the father of a certain portion of the human family.

"Association fund 110 11. Contributed by the churches, $42.

"Paid Messengers.—C. Felder, $10; J. Young, $5; J. Cain, $5; due the present Treasurer, $6 06. Printing minutes, $45.

 "Mission fund $111. Collection on Lord's day $45 62. Received from different churches $29 85. Total $186 47.

 "Paid C. Felder, $42. Balance $144.47.

1834

In October, the Association convened at East Fork, Amite county—13 churches represented.

Eld. E. Courtney, chosen Moderator, and D. Lea, Clerk.

Letters of correspondence to Union Association, Pearl River, Leaf River and Yazoo.

"Corresponding Messengers.—To Union, Felder and Rabourn; to Pearl River, Reeves and Young; to Leaf River, Reeves and Young.

"Resolved, That brethren Brian, Cheatham and Sibly be appointed a committee to employ missionaries in the ensuing year.

"Resolved, That this Association recommend the churches of her union to take into view the blessing of God on foreign and home missionary labors; that each individual should instruct himself by a liberal and prayerful zeal, to send the gospel to every human being, for it is God's method by which he will give to His Son the heathen for his inheritance, and the remotest parts of the earth for his possession."

1835

 In October, the Association convened at Zion Hill, Amite county—16 churches represented.

Brother C. Felder chosen Moderator, and H. D. F. Roberts, Clerk.

"Lord's day, J. Webb, J. Fairchild, E. Courtney and J. P. Martin, preached in the order of their names—a considerable number of both sexes availed themselves of an invitation to kneel before the stand, and have the prayers of the brethren made in their behalf.

"Correspondence.—Pearl River, Union, Leaf River and Yazoo Associations.

"Messengers.—To Pearl River, C. Felder and Z. Reeves —to Union, S. Coker and J. Young—Leaf River, E. Courtney, H. T. F. Roberts and T. M. Bond.

"Reports on Missions.—Bro. C. Felder rode 30 days, preached 36 sermons, and travelled 444 miles for which he is allowed $30.

"Bro. Jesse Young rode 19 days, preached 20 sermons —travelled 350 miles, for which he is allowed $19.

"Resolved, That this Association transfer all missionary monies now in the treasurer's hands, amounting to $201 42, over to the treasurer of the Missionary Society.

Resolved, That this Association recommend to the churches, the consideration presented to us by the Union Association; the propriety of meeting by delegates, in a State Convention of Mississippi Baptists, to take into consideration the utility of patronizing a State Seminary, to be under the control of the Baptist denomination, and also for Missionary purposes, and that they express their view in their letters to the next meeting of this body."

"Association fund $87 06—contributions from the churches $69 69. Total $156 75.

"Paid to Messengers $34—for printing these minutes $50—balance in treasury $72 75.

1836

 In October, the Association convened at Galilee church, Amite county—18 churches represented—21 in all. Elder C. Felder, chosen Moderator, and H. D. F. Roberts, Clerk.

"Letters of correspondence received from Associations: Union, Yazoo, Pearl River, and Bethel.

"Corresponding letters sent to the same, and also to Leaf River. Messengers sent to all but Yazoo.

"Appointed the following brethren to preach on Sabbath: J. B. Smith, S. S. Lattimore, A. Vaughan and J. Bailie.

"Resolved, That this Association deem it important, that the Baptists in this State should meet in convention by delegation, to take into consideration the adoption of some systematic plan, by which the efforts of our denomination may be united, her resources drawn out, the Gospel preached to the destitute, religious information disseminated, and other objects of importance, to the advancement of the Redeemer's kingdom.

"Resolved, That we recommend a meeting consisting of delegates from Associations, Missionary societies and churches; also, of individuals, to be held at Washington, Mississippi, on Friday before the 4th Sabbath in December next, to consider the propriety of forming a State Convention of our denomination.

"Resolved, That brethren C. Felder, J. B. Smith, H. D. F. Roberts, S. Coker and J. Young, be appointed as delegates from this Association to attend the above mentioned meeting.

"Resolved, That we rejoice in the fact that our beloved Judson has accomplished the entire translation of the Bible in the Birman language, and that the American and Foreign Bible Society, organized in Philadelphia, to aid in publishing the Bible, in that and other languages, has the confidence and approbation of this body."

"Resolved, That we have confidence in the objects and government of the contemplated Judson Institute, and take pleasure in recommending it to the patronage of the friends of religion and literature.

"Association fund $72 75—contributions from the churches $78 25. Total $152.

"Paid Corresponding Messengers $29—for printing these minutes, $50—balance in treasury $73.

Extract From the Circular Letter

A great deal has been said against missionaries, and it must be acknowledged there would not be so much' use for them, provided our country was well supplied with settled preachers, that would do their duty. * * ***** To all the young ministers whom God may raise up within our bounds, the Judson Institute is the thing needful. It is entirely under Baptist direction and control; it will be filled with teachers from the most prominent in the ranks of the Baptist preachers."

1837

In October, the Association convened at Jerusalem church, Amite county—22 churches represented— 23 in all.

Brother C. Felder chosen Moderator, and H. D. F. Roberts, Clerk.

"Letters and Messengers from Union, Pearl River, and Leaf River Association — also a letter from Yazoo Association.

"Association fund, $73—contributed by the churches, $110 12—total $183 12.

"Paid corresponding Messengers $29—for printing these minutes (1,250 copies), $100. C. Felder as Superintendent, $15—balance in treasury, $38 75.

Extract From the Circular Letter

"The purposes of God are perfect and unalterable. His infinite wisdom and perfect knowledge, forbid the occurrence of any event or change of circumstances, which would dictate the slightest alteration in his plans; and his absolute power precludes the possibility of frustration by any obstacle. It is with great propriety, therefore, that God himself assures us that 'His council shall stand; that he will do all his pleasure.' These purposes can be made known to us, or concealed from us, as God pleases. But, in relation to the plan of salvation, in which we are chiefly concerned, it has pleased God to reveal, by the spirit of prophecy, the outlines of his eternal purpose and grace, which embrace the salvation of his people. The work of salvation is represented in Scripture as being properly and strictly the work of God. Christ, the ransom price of our redemption, is the gift of God. 'He has made him to be sin for us.' The renovation of the human heart, and the translation of a sinner out of darkness, into marvellous, light, is universally ascribed to God. Of his own will begat he us. We are his workmanship created in Christ Jesus unto good works. According to his mercy, he saved us by the washing of regeneration, and the renewing of the Holy Ghost. Now, if the salvation of sinners is properly, as these Scriptures teach, the work of God, then, according to the position established, their salvation is effected in accordance with God's previous purpose.

"Hence the purpose of God, which is eternal and unchangeable, embraces the salvation of every soul that God ever saved, or will ever save. This view is confirmed by the language of the Apostle to the Ephesians: 'According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love, having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.' It is also confirmed by his language to Timothy: 'Who hath saved us and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began.' And here is the very essence of the doctrine of election or predestination, which is so much contested. The very pith of this doctrine is simply God's previous purpose or intention to do, in the salvation of sinners, what he does do. If God, at a certain time, and in a certain way, calls, renews and saves an individual, predestination in reference to that individual denotes God's previous design to call, renew, and save him, at that certain time, and in that particular way. Hence, if the doctrine of predestination embraces any one sinner that God saves, it embraces, of necessity, every sinner that God has saved or will save. Election, therefore, is necessarily personal and eternal.

"Now, surely, no person who is capable of discovering the connection between three ideas, can admit that salvation is really and truly the work of God, and yet deny the doctrine of election as here explained. If sinners save themselves, this doctrine may be false; but, if God saves them, it is true, and will stand when the heavens and the earth shall be no more. God has a definite purpose, therefore, fixed and unalterable, which embraces everything that he does, or has any control over, in the great plan of the redemption."

1838

In October, the Association convened at Jackson church, La.—23 churches represented—27 in all.

"The introductory sermon was delivered by brother Reeves, from Titus ii: 14.—"Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works."

"Brother C. Felder chosen Moderator, and H. D. F. Roberts, Clerk.

"Read the articles of faith.

"A petition was presented by Elder E. Courtney, complaining of corrupt and unjust conduct towards him, by Hepzibah and Ebenezer churches. The petition was rejected as unconstitutional, and the following resolution adopted:

Resolved, That this Association disclaims all power to interfere with the government of the churches, but for the good of the cause of Christ, she recommends Hepzibah and Ebenezer churches to call a committee of brethren in this Association, and that Elder Courtney choose an equal number of brethren in the Association, and that the persons chosen by the churches and said Courtney compose an advisary counsel, all of whom are to be disinterested and unprejudiced either way, and that said council, thus composed, shall investigate the difficulties, and recommend said parties to settle them in a gospel and satisfactory way, if possible.

"Association fund $48 75—contributions from the churches $127—total $175 75.

"Paid Corresponding Messengers $17.00—for printing these minutes $75,00—C. Felder, as superintendent $15— balance in treasury $38.75.

1839 

In October, the Association convened at New Providence church, Amite county—27 churches represented—28 in all.

'Brother C. Felder chosen Moderator, and C. E. Pinckney, Clerk.

"Read the articles of faith.

"Correspondence, by letter and messengers, was received from Leaf River, Pearl River and Union Associations.

"The Hepzibah church complained to the Association that Jackson church had received and retained in her fellowship Elder E. Courtney, whome she had previously excluded—whereupon.

Resolved, That this Association recommend the above churches to settle the difficulty among themselves; and, for the accomplishment of that object, to call such help from sister churches as they may think proper.

"Resolved, That in the opinion of this Association, there are three things necessary to constitute gospel baptism, viz: 'A regularly authorized administrator; a believer in Christ; and immersion in the name of the Holy Trinity—and as such, those ministers who have been excluded from our communion for immorality, or heresy, are not proper administrators, and consequently, immersion administered by Campbellite, or reforming teachers, as they call themselves, is not valid baptism.

"Association fund $38.75—contributed by the churches $133 75—total $172 50.

"Paid J. Young $13—Z. Reeves $4—for printing these minutes $75—C. Felder, as superintendent $14—balance in treasury $65 50.

Churches and Messengers.—New Providence, R. Wilkinson, J. Jenkins; Ebenezer, R. Johns, W. Jackson; East Fork, C. Felder, J. Wilson; Zion Hill. M. Seal, A. Butler; Shilo, J. Tison, C. Edwards; Jerusalem. W. Wall, C. Wall; Percy's Creek, no delegation; Hepzibah, S. Walker, C. Pinkney, R. Taylor; Mount Nebo, P. Bankston, D. Sanders; Mars Hill, R. Chadwick, M. Whittington; Mount Zion, W. Clark, G. Clay; Hopewell, John Ford, N. Lee; Galilee, J. Straughan, T. Causey; Salem, R. Quin, C. Tate; Pinckneyville, T. Hunter, N. Daws; Friendship, S. Coker, J. Reeves; Beulah, R. F. Sibly, A. Addison; Ramah, Jesse Young, John Gill; Jackson. S. Brian, F. Brian; Clinton. James Smith, A. W. Poole; Hebron, T. M. Bond, J. Phelps, Bethlehem, D. Morgan, D. Chany; Mount Enon, James Wright, James Strickland; Mount Pleasant, Z. Reeves, W. Thompson; Liberty, D. Lea, J. Turnipseed; Baton Rouge, Peter Harbour, Wm. Thomas; Mount Ebal, R. Hutchinson; Mount Moriah, M. Naul, D. Lewis."

1840

In October, the Association convened at Ebenezer church, Amite county—23 churches represented.

"Brother C. Felder chosen Moderator, and J. B. Smith, Clerk.

"Association fund $70 50—contributed by the churches $115 12—total $185 62.

"Paid Z. Reeves, (messenger) $20—W. B. Wall, for two years, $26—S. Coker, $4—for printing these minutes $60—C. Felder, as superintendent, $15—balance in the treasury $40 62.

1841

In October, the Association convened at East Fork church, Amite county—32 churches represented—36 in all.

"Brother S. Coker chosen Moderator, and H. McKnight, Clerk.

"Correspondence with Leaf River, Pearl River, Union and Louisiana Associations.

"Association fund $40.63—contributed by the churches, $161 37—total $202.

"Paid S. Coker, (messenger) $13—H. Wall, (do) $16—for printing these minutes, $70—the Clerk, as superintendent $15—balance in treasury, $87.

1842

In October, the Association convened at Bluff Creek, La.—38 churches represented.

"Brother C. Felder chosen Moderator, and T. M. Bond, Clerk.

"Read the articles of faith.

"Correspondence with Union, Pearl River and Louisiana Associations.

"Association fund $87; contributed by the churches $121 50; total $208 50.

"Paid Z. Reeves, (messenger) $40; J. Young, (do.) $16; T. M. Bond, (do.) $16—for printing these minutes $45; for superintending the same $15; balance in treasury, $76 50."

1843

In October, the Association convened at Liberty, Amite county—21 churches represented,—(reduced in number, by dimissing churches to form two other Associations viz: Eastern Louisiana, and Mississippi River.)

"Brother Z. Reeves chosen Moderator, and H. D. F. Roberts, Clerk.

"By motion of brother Roberts, brother E. Courtney, with the aid of brother T. M. Bond, was appointed to draw up and furnish brother D. Benedict with a brief history of this Association, and of the older churches composing it.

"Bro. C. Felder died since last session.

"Resolved, That this Association appoint E. Courtney, S. Coker, J. Young, Z. Reeves, H. D. F. Roberts, W. Clark and T. R. Cheatham, a committee to meet and revise the fourth article of faith, of this Association, so far as respects form, and report at our next meeting.

"Association fund $76 50—contributed by the churches $74 35—total $150 85.

"Paid for printing these minutes $75—for superintending the same, $15—T. M. Bond, (messenger) $18—S. Coker, (do.) $14—Eastern Louisiana Association (distributive share) $28,25—balance in treasury, 60 cents.

1844

In October, the Association convened at Galilee, Amite county—19 churches represented.

"Brother S. Coker chosen Moderator, and G. P. Claughton, Clerk.

"Letter and Messengers received from Pearl River, Union, and Eastern Louisiana Associations.

"A letter of correspondence was received from the Mississippi River Association by the hands of her delegate, Elder W. B. Wall—whereupon, the faith of said Association was read, and there being some objections raised, the correspondence was laid on the table until Monday morning.

"Correspondence by letter and Messengers arranged with the three first named Associations.

"The subject of correspondence with the Mississippi River Association was taken up, and after a free and full discussion on the orthodoxy of their faith, the motion to correspond was withdrawn by their messenger.

"The committee appointed by this body at her last session to revise the fourth article of her faith, reported, which report was received, and ordered to be printed with these minutes. (But it was not done, and the writer is unable to ascertain what kind of a report was made on the subject.)

"The Zion Hill church presented a grievance against the Liberty church, which was taken up, and a committee appointed to labor with the Liberty church ,and report at the next meeting of this body; and that T. R. Cheatham, T. Caney, Z. Reeves, J. Sojourner, and S. M. Brian, be said committee; and that the Clerk be instructed to furnish the Liberty church with a copy of the charges preferred against her by the Zion Hill church.

"The Liberty church petitioned for a letter of dismission, which was rejected on account of existing difficulties with the Zion Hill church.

"Association fund 60 cents — contributed by the churches, $75 15—public collection $14 25—by a friend $1 60—total $.

"Paid W. B. Wall, $10—for printing minutes, $40— superintending the same $15—balance in treasury $26.64,

1845

 In October, the Association convened at Mount Pleasant church, Pike county; — churches represented.

"Brother Z. Reeves, chosen Moderator, and G. P. Claughton, Clerk.

Correspondence arranged with Pearl River, Union and Eastern Louisiana Association.

"Committee appointed by this body at its last session to labor with the Liberty church, made their report, which was received and the committee discharged:

"We, your committee, appointed to visit the Liberty church, to labor with her to settle, if possible, a difficulty existing between her and the Zion Hill church, beg leave to report: Met, pursuant to an appointment, with the Liberty church, in connection with the committee from Zion Hill church, on Friday before the 2nd Sabbath in November, 1844, and after some labor and discussion upon the subject, the said difficulty was amicably settled, by the Liberty church erasing out the sixth article of the faith which she had adopted, and inserting the 15th and 16th verses of the 16th chapter of Mark in its stead, and also erasing out the third line of the eighth article. . All of which is respectfully submitted.

"Elder H. D. F. Roberts, rose and said, that he felt bound and authorized, as a pastor of Liberty church and delegate from that body, to acknowledge it a rash act on his own, and on the part of the church, to adopt articles of faith, which this association had publicly disapprobated.

"It was moved and unanimously carried, that this Association extend her love and forgiveness to the Liberty church, as if no difficulty had occurred between them.

"Association fund $26 63—contributed by the churches $170 82—total $134 55.

"Paid J. Young $10—W. Clark, $10—M. T. Conn, $10; for printing these minutes, $55; for superintending minutes $15; balance in treasury, $32 45.

1846

In October, the Association convened at Mount Zion church, Franklin county;—churches represented.

"Brother Z. Reeves chosen Moderator, and G. P. Claughton, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with Union, Pearl River, and Eastern Louisiana Associations.

"Association fund $32 55; contributions by the churches $108 30; total $140 75.

"Paid T. M. Bond (messenger) $21 00; Z. Reeves, $8; M. T. Conn, $10; balance in treasury, $98 75.

1847 

In October, the Association convened at Percy's Creek church, Wilkinson county;—churches represented.
 
"Brother Z. Reeves chosen Moderator, and G. P. Claughton, Clerk.

"Correspondence was arranged with the Union, Pearl River, and Eastern Louisiana Associations.

'A petitionary letter was received from the Pearl River Association, requesting us to appoint delegates to meet her in convention in connection with the Mississippi River Association—whereupon, a committee to nominate delegates was appointed, viz: Brethren R. Thompson, J. W. Felder, G. P. Claughton, J. Thomas and B. Miles, who made the following nominations, viz: Brethren J. D. McFarland, T. M. Bond, Z. Reeves, W. Clark, G. P. Claughton, J. W. Felder, and E. Gresham, which nominations were agreed to.

"Whereas, the Mississippi Baptist State Convention has addressed a letter to this Association, asking aid from us to assist the weak chuches within the State.

Therefore,

Resolved, That we lay this matter before the churches composing this Association—that if any of the churches feel free to give a helping hand, they will send up a separate fund for that purpose, at the next meeting of this body.

"Association fund $98 75; contributed by the churches $102 50; total $201 25.

"Paid for printing minutes last year $35; for superintendence $15; J. D. McFarland, $12; S. Coker, $8; Wilson Clark, $10; for printing these minutes $55; for superintendence $15; balance in treasury, $51 25.

1848

In October, the Association convened at Hopewell church, Franklin county;—churches represented.

"Elder Z. Reeves .chosen Moderator, and G. P. Claughton, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from three Associations, viz: Union, Pearl River and Eastern Louisiana.

"Correspondence, by letter and delegates, arranged with the same.

"The delegates appointed by this body at its last session to meet in convention with the Pearl River and Mississippi River Associations, were called on to make their report; but not being prepared at this moment,

Elder Z. Reeves was requested to make a short statement of the same, which gave satisfaction; whereupon, brother R. R. Webb was appointed to write a corresponding letter to our sister, the Mississippi River Association, and elders J. D. McFarland, A. McKenzie and Z. Reeves, be our Messengers to the same.

"To the Mississippi Baptist Association:

"The undersigned persons, appointed delegates by your body in session last year, to meet in convention with the Pearl River, Mississippi River, and Eastern Louisiana Associations, for the purpose of settling the difficulties existing between this and the Mississippi River, beg leave to report, that we performed the services assigned us, and that after full and free investigation, and explanation, the difficulty was fully and satisfactorily settled, so far as we are concerned.

"Query from the New Providence Church.—Is it according to gospel order to receive members from the Campbellites, without rebaptism? Whereupon, the following brethren were appointed to draft an answer, viz: S. Coker, W. Clark, C. Stewart, A. McKenzie, and H. McKnight, who reported as follows:

"That we consider it improper to answer the question in the form presented; but recommend, for the satisfaction of that, and all the other churches composing this Association, the adoption of the following resolution, viz: 'That this Association deem it unscriptural for a church to receive a person as a member, from the Campbellites, Reformers, or any other denomination, without baptism.'

"Whereas, this Association does not transact missionary business; therefore

"Resolved, That we recommend to the favorable attention of the churches, the Missionary Society in its bounds, as affording a facility through which they may carry out their benevolent designs on that subject.

"Whereas, the Pearl River Association has recommended to this Association the meeting of a convention, to prepare an article of faith and rules of decorum ,so that uniformity of article and rules of decorum may exist among our Associations and churches; and to appoint and send messengers to the same.

"Resolved, That we cordially approve of the object, and convention contemplated, and that we appoint a committee to select seven suitable delegates to meet in said convention, at the time and place appointed by said Pearl River Association, viz: At Hopewell church, Copiah county, on Saturday before the first Sabbath in August, 1849; said delegates to report at our next meeting.

"The following brethren were appointed a nominating committee viz: J. Cain, A. Butler and D. Perkins, who nominated Elders S. Coker, Z. Reeves. W. Clark, H. McKnight, A. McKenzie, J. D. McFarland and M. Seal, as delegates to said convention."

"Association fund $51 30; amount refunded $10; contributed by the churches, $180 80; total $162 10.

"Paid J. Young, $10; R. Wilkinson, $14; for printing these minutes, $40; for superintendence, $15; balance in treasury, $83 10.

1849

In October, the Association convened at Bogue Chitto church, Pike county—churches represented.

"Elder Z. Reeves chosen Moderator, and G. P. Claughton, Clerk.

"Correspondence received by letter and messengers from three Associations, viz: Pearl River, Mississippi River, and Eastern Louisiana.

Correspondence arranged with the same in return, and also with Union Association.

"In view of the commotions now agitating the nations of the earth—the result of which is the opening the foreign ports to the messengers of the Gospel of Salvation—that now the Missionaries of the Cross have entered many of the heathen cities with the word of God, and messages of love to our fellow dying men—as well as the downfall of Popery, which indicates to us the near approach of Messiah's universal reign; therefore,

"Resolved, That we earnestly recommend to our churches, and all Christians, this indication of Divine Providence, as a suitable time for them to unite in their prayers and contributions for the foreign missionary operations, to aid in the great work of giving the Gospel to the heathen, and for all other efforts for its spread at home as well as abroad.

"Association fund, $83 10; contributed by the churches, $100 30; total $183 40.
 
 "Paid W. Clark, $22; Z. Reeves, $40; A. McKenzie, $8; M. T. Conn, $12; M. Seal, $10; W. Clark, $12; Z. Reeves, $12; S. Coker, $10; for printing these minutes, $40; for superintendence, $15; balance in treasury $2 40.

1850 

In October, the Association convened at Zion Hill church, Amite county—23 churches represented.

'Elder Z. Reeves chosen Moderator, and G. P. Claughton, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from four Associations, viz: Pearl River, Union, Mississippi River, and Eastern Louisiana.

"Correspondence to the same arranged.

"Resolved, That the blessing of God, which have attended the labors of our missionaries to the heathen, and especially the labors of our deceased brother, Judson, indicate to us that the missionary cause is a cause approved of God.

"Whereas, there is at this time a great opening, and constant earnest appeals made, both from the heathen, and our beloved brethren who are laboring in heathen lands, for the Gospel, and more faithful laborers to promulgate the truth of the glorious Gospel; and in view of the great want of means in the Treasury of the Foreign Board, to carry out their benevolent and praise— worthy designs.

"Therefore, be it

"Resolved, That this important subject commends itself, with peculiar force, to the Christian sympathy, prayers, and liberal patronage of all who love our Saviour and His gospel, and we do most earnestly recommend to the ministers of our Association, to bring this subject before their several churches and congregations, and recommend to the churches to respond to the call of their pastors, and take up a free— will contribution for that purpose, and send it up to the Treasurer of this Association, to aid in sending the gospel to the benighted heathen.

"Resolved, That domestic missions claim our peculiar regard; that circumstances have been and are now transpiring, which call for great efforts to be made by the people of God, to sustain the domestic mission cause; that we recommend to the ministers of this Association, to present the cause to their respective churches and congregations during the present Associational year, requesting the churches and congregations to respond to the same, by liberal, free— will offerings to God, for the support of said cause, and to send the same up to this Association, that the same may be forwarded to such bodies for that purpose, as the Association may deem proper, or as the respective churches may direct.

"Association fund $2 38; contributed by the churches, $113 20; contributed by individuals, $20 20; total $135 80.

"Paid Wilson Clark, $14; Moses Seal, $12; A. McKenzie, $18; R. Wilkinson, $20; Liberty Post Office, 25 cents; for printing these minutes $45; for superintendance $15."

Remarks.—The Mississippi Baptist Association was constituted on the principles in substance, that were adopted by the General Assembly of Particular Baptists of England in 1689; and also the Philadelphia Association in 1742. And though they had many ups and downs, in their hard struggles with the missionaries—and though the flood cast out of the serpent's mouth, beat strong against the walls of gospel order, and at times would seem to overflow and carry everything before it, yet, aided by grace, they "fought a good fight and kept the faith."

We have given full quotations, from the minutes, of every thing relating to missionism, so that the reader can have a fair chance of drawing his own inferences. We have also given extracts from the circulars, setting forth principles on both sides of the question. In 1815, the first heavy wave of the missionary flood overwhelmned the Association for a time. A letter was received from the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions; and its horseleech entreaties for money pressed upon the churches. The minutes make no mention of the discussion of this subject. Indeed it is not usual to do so. Hence we are unable to learn what opposition was raised to these unscriptural proceedings. Be that as it may, the Association permitted itself to become, for a time, the satellite of the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, and it forthwith issued a circular full of the missionary spirit.

In order to expose the cunning and deceit, dictated by this spirit, to delude these Old Regular Baptists, we quote ' from the circular, to wit: "Godly zeal will induce you to make many sacrifices, to suffer many privations, and to forego many inconveniences, that you may promote the interest of religion, and the salvation of God's elect." This spirit knew the faith to which these people held, andhence the insidious drift in order to win their good feelings.

It is more than likely that he had also a deeper and darker design, of casting a blur upon the character of Jesus—as if he had undertaken to save his people from their sins, and was not able to accomplish it, without the zealous aid of the people. But it is not likely that even the writer was permitted to know or see this bottom design. How necessary, then, for all Christians to try the spirits, by the word, lest peradventure they be found fighting against the truth, under the influence of their worst enemy.
Not withstanding this dark eclipse, it soon passed off at least in part. The reader is referred to an extract from the circular letter of 1816, in which he will find some heavy blows dealt out against flattery, disorder, church troubles, &c.

In 1817, "Elder James A. Ranaldson, missionary (and church troubler) being present, was invited by the Moderator to take a seat in the Association." The tide of Foreign Missions having receded, Elder J. A. Ranaldson, and those under his immediate influence, succeeded in getting up a flaw on pious education. At the succeeding session a constitution was reported and adopted:

"1st. The society shall be styled the Mississippi Baptist Education Society.

2nd, The avowed and determined object of this society shall be to assist pious, evangelical young men, called to the work of the gospel ministry, in receiving a literary and theological education."
Eight more sections are added, and then follows the appointment of President, Secretary, Treasurer and Trustees. This wave, too, soon receded back into the gulf, and left the Association, in 1819, on dry ground, once more free from all such cumbersome apparatus.

This gave them an opportunity of turning their attention to an object which Christian duty required at their hands. And that was to exhort those who were masters to treat their slaves according to the rule laid down in the gospel. The abolition excitement rendered it necessary, that they warn the brethren against over cautiousness and severity; in guarding against evil influences "always keep in view, that you have a Master in Heaven."
 
In 1820, Samuel Marsh and James A. Ranaldson, a couple of "church troublers," with cloaks drawn snugly around them, were permitted, under the sanction of the Association to visit all the churches during the ensuing year. Preliminary steps were also taken at this session for a general meeting, which ultimately became a State Convention. This lived a puny life until 1830, when it was annihilated by the following resolution, viz: "A departure from any gospel doctrine is heresy, according to the scriptures—the Baptists believing that their faith is in strict conformity to the Scriptures, whatever is contrary to their faith, is heresy to them." This was mainly aimed at the Campbellites, but like a two— edged sword, it cut more ways than one, and thrust the State Convention in its most vital part.

We must now notice another important fact worthy of consideration. The Association is formed of delegates sent by the churches, for the purpose of promoting social and religious intercourse, and the mutual benefit of counselling together, on difficult questions. When the advice of the Association is in strict accordance with the Scriptures, it is gladly received by the churches. But when the Association gives advice, which the churches reject, it is proof positive, that there is something wrong in one party or the other. In the case now under consideration, notwithstanding the repeated advice of the Association in favor of the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions, we can find but one instance in which funds were sent up for that purpose. In 1819 Antioch church contributed $21 75, and Hepzibah church $1 50, for Foreign Missions, but the other thirty— eight churches belonging to the Association contributed nothing for this purpose. The State Convention and Educational Society "all likewise perished." Covetousness, of course, was the cause. This is the stale charge brought by the missionary spirit against every church or churches who refuse to obey its unscriptural dictation. This, by reference to an extract from the circular of 1821, you will find to be strongly insinuated against the brethren. The extracts alluded to should all be read as a model of pious literature—illustrating the great advantages of a theological education.

Also, read the extract from the circular of 1824 in which you will find the foregoing advantages more forcibly set forth; and a strong manifestation of the bold and chivalrous bearing of the missionary spirit in attempting a hazardous achievement. The following is a quotation, viz:
 
 "We need men trained by every rule of Heavenly discipline to the sacred warfare. Men who are thoroughly armed, and able to carry the assault to the very gate of the enemy, to storm his garrison, and drive him from his last entrenchment."

Is this not fascinating presumption? Have they not more to fear from the gate being thrown wide open for their reception, than from any impediment in scaling the walls? Does not the Spirit and the word say, "Come out of her, my people, that ye be not partakers of her sins, and that ye receive not of her plagues?"

In 1828 and 1829, the Association sent the hat around for public contributions. The succeeding year they resolved to discontinue such a practice. The next year again, they resolved to resume it, and continued it till 1833, after which no trace of such a practice can be found, in their minutes.

These public collections were designed to sustain a kind of home Missionary System, which they had gotten up among them. Subsequent to the demise of the Foreign Mission cause, the State Convention, the pious Education Society, &c, these Gallatian brethren undertook a system under their own immediate control. This was done by appointing a commitee to employ ministers "to ride and preach under their direction, within the limits of the Association." The preachers were required to report to the committee "the number of days they have served, sermons preached, and places where." Thus exalting a committee to the exercise of a prerogative reserved to Himself by the Lord of Glory; and which the apostles, or any apostolic church, never attempted to exercise.

In 1835, she received a proposition from her eldest daughter, the Union Association, to meet by delegates for the purpose of forming a State Convention once more. The matter was laid before the churches for their consideration, and they requested to "express their views in their letters to the next meeting of this body." We have no means of ascertaining how the churches viewed this proposition, as the minutes make no mention of it.

At the succeeding session, the Association appointed delegates to meet at Washington, in Adams county, for the purpose of forming a Convention, in which Associations, Missionary Societies and individuals, might be represented. The missionary spirit now bid fair to swell into as much importance as ever.
 
The Association took pleasure in recommending the Judson Institute to the friends of religion. Their circular says: "To all the young ministers whom God may raise up within our bounds, the Judson Institute is the thing needful." This "thing needful" was located at Middleton, Carroll county. Those who are acquainted with the rise and fall of that pious institute, will know how to appreciate the carte blanche to which the Association signed her "confidence."

In 1837, while the missionary spirit was swelling with anticipations of the future; and promising the Association great things, if she would serve him; some how, or some how else, a circular letter from abroad was presented, just in time, from which we have made a copious extract. The letter was read and adopted by the Association. And now, gentle reader, will you turn to that extract, and read it, and then return, and let me tell you the effect?

Well, the Missionary spirit left that place in haste; and Missionism fell upon its face, to the ground, and both the palms of its hands were cut off. These Gallatian brethren once more come to themselves, and resolved to quit feeding swine, and return to their Father, and live upon his bounty; for they had been taught to know that He had plenty and to spare. They now acted for a number of years, like they were trying by grace to be reconciled to God, instead of trying to reconcile Him to themselves.

Nothing appears in the minutes, for a number of years following, that would have been a bar to fellowship with the Old School Baptist generally. The missionary spirit being foiled in its anticipations, commenced an insidious and malicious fling at those who stood up against its efforts. The following from the minutes of 1842 will ' illustrate this subject:

"Resolved, That we deeply regret that there has appeared at different times in the 'Banner and Pioneer/ a number of expressions that misrepresent the views and characters of the churches and ministers of this Association, such as the following: "Some of the ministers at that period were, doubtless, near the line of antinomianism;' 'singing psalms in a cock— pit;' "strikers;' "guardians of the faith;' safe depository of faith;' 'selfexalted domineering keepers of conscience;' 'pullers of wires;' 'if they had efficient pastors.' &c.
 
Therefore,

Resolved, That this Association regards these things highly censurable, &c."
The truth is, the Association and churches had been, in former years, too lax in their 'guardianship of the faith,' and they were now seeing and feeling the sad consequences. The following from one of the church letters to the Association, and published in the minutes of 1842, will be amply sufficient on this subject:

"Shiloh.—The letter from this church is of an interesting nature, exhibiting a small number struggling against a tide of opposition, having the form of godliness, but denying the power. We fear that the standard of evangelical piety, which hath its seat in the heart, and the operations of which are felt in the soul, has been lamentably low in this region, and that many have assumed the name of disciples, and have become partakers of ordinances of the gospel, who have never felt its power. While the road has been made easy and the qualifications slight, many have been tempted, we fear, to go forward in the holy rite of baptism, who make no pretensions to, and some who do not believe in that fundamental doctrine of the gospel, a change of heart."

The Association had been in a like condition at various times since 1815. But they had now driven out every vestige of the corrupt missionary system, so far as we can learn from their minutes. And, as the hireling system is one of the distinguishing traits of the New School Baptists, by way of contrast, we extract the following from the circular of 1843, showing the view of this Association, on that subject, viz:

"Now the true minister of Christ is not altogether at liberty to choose his place of residence, but must submit to an overruling Providence. When invited to take the oversight of a church, he is commanded to do so 'willingly, not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mind.'—1 Peter, 5 and 2. 'The fact of a minister refusing to preach to a church for the lack of any particular sum as a salary, has no foundation in the word of God. To say, I will preach for a thousand dollars, for five hundred dollars, or for one hundred dollars; in a word setting up a certain sum for which he will supply a church, and without which he will not preach to her, savors much of a love of filthy lucre, and has no precedent in the writings of the apostles, nor among the primitive saints." .

The circular then goes on to enforce the duty, which no true church will deny, of sustaining the ministry.

The missionary spirit smarting under former defeats, and having learned that it could not prevail against them effectually, so long as they "kept the faith," now commenced a plan for having it changed. On a former occasion it had persuaded them to get up a missionary effort "to save God's elect." They soon saw through this flimsy veil—and though it had often cast them down, yet they had as often risen again. Therefore, the effort must now be directed against the faith.

The plan, as manifested, was to get up a committee to revise the most objectionable article first, and at the same time draw off, and form the Mississippi River Association, upon articles of faith suitable for the occasion. But the whole scheme was defeated. The committee reported in favor of "keeping the faith," and a correspondence with the new Association was declined.

The Liberty church also made a simultaneous effort against "the faith," which came up before the Association in the form of a charge by the Zion Hill church. Finding, however, that she had no alternative but to secede or conform, she chose the latter. In this she done right. Had the Association changed, it would not only have been her right but her duty to secede. But so long as the Association maintains the letter and spirit of her original formation, the churches are bound by every principle of moral rectitude to sustain her.
Notwithstanding many things are impelling us beyond our contemplated limits, the propriety, every way, of the circular letter of 1845, is such, as we are constrained to give place to the following extract, viz:

"Beloved Brethren: In compliance with the order of your last anniversary meeting, we address you with a circular letter; and from the various circumstances and difficulties that we, as an Association, have had to meet with for the three past years, relative to doctrinal views, which we, as an Association, profess to hold, we invite your attention to the exhortation and charge, given by an inspired apostle to the church, "that you should earnestly contend for the faith that was once delivered to the saints."

"This epistle, as some few others are, is styled general, or catholic, i. e., to all them that are sanctified by God the Father, and preserved in Jesus Christ, and can the whole society of Christians of that time converted to the faith of Christ, and will be of standing, lasting and special use, in and to the church, so long as time shall last. One design the apostle had in writing this epistle was, to caution the church against evil and perverse men, who were already sprung up in that infant state of the church, and would be succeeded by others of the like evil spirit and temper, in after times. In Tim. iv: I, we are told of what should take place in the latter times, the apostle uses the following language:

"Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducting spirits and doctrines of devils, speaking lies in hypocrisy, having their conscience seared with a hot iron."

In 2Ti 3:1-7, we are told by the Apostle:

"This know also, that in the last days, perilous times shall come, for men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasting, proud, blasphemous, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, without natural affection, truce breakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good, heady, high— minded, lovers of pleasure more than of God, having the form of godliness but denying the power thereof; from such turn away; for of this sort are they which creep into houses and lead captive silly women laden with sins, led away with divers lusts, ever learning and never able to come to a knowledge of the truth.'
'The Apostle Peter, in his epistle to "them that have obtained like precious faith with us,' warned the church of those characters that would infest her, in her last days, viz: 'Knowing this first, that there shall come in the last days, scoffers walking after their own lusts.'—
2Pe 3:3.

"The apostle Paul, in one of his last charges to the elders, when about to leave them, when his eyes were streaming with tears, and his heart burning with love for the future welfare of the church, which Christ had purchased with his own blood, said to them, 'Elders, for I know this, after my departing shall grievous wolves enter in among you, not sparing the flock; also of your own selves shall men arise, speaking perverse things to draw away disciples after them.' After examining to some extent the predictions of the inspired apostle, relative to those individuals who would infest the church, and strive to turn away the disciples from the faith, more or less, throughout the gospel dispensation, we have seen one of the great designs of the apostle in writing the epistle, in which our subject stands—to establish them in 'the faith' and a practice and conversation truly conservant and conformable thereunto—and in an open and bold profession thereof—especially in times of a notorious opposition, whether by artful seduction, or violent and inhuman persecution.

"As we have received the charge and exhortation from Divine authority, we must see to it very carefully, that it be really the Christian faith which we believe, profess, propagate, and contend for, not the creeds, and doctrines, and man— made abstracts, called faith; nothing of later date than the inspired writings of the holy evangelists and apostles. Their sayings are faithful and worthy of all acceptation. It is the faith once delivered to the saints, to which nothing should be added or taken from. Here let us abide—here we are safe—if we stir a step further, we are in danger of being entangled or seduced."

Here follow four or five pages relative to the Mediator, and then continues thus:
"From these texts, it is plain that all the means and instrumentality which was to be used to effect the salvation of his people, were chosen at the same time. It is the opinion of some of our modern preachers, that this doctrine should not be preached, because it perplexes the minds of men, and some have been wicked enough to say, after they bad come in the church, by acknowledging and professing to believe the doctrine of Election find Predestination, and for several years try to preach it, that they now prefer a universal system. Such men must be unstable in all their ways, and must have used hvpocrisy when they came into the church—but their objection is not the question to be decided.

"Is it a Bible doctrine? Has God revealed it in his word? If so, then it ought to be proclaimed throughout the length and breadth of the land, and earnestly contended for, as part of that faith once delivered to the
Saints.

"The church must have been definite in the mind of Christ, (#John 17:20,) or how could the hairs of their head have been numbered, or their names written in Heaven.—Re 13:8; Lu 10:20.

"Surely, there is a great difference between the spirit that Paul possessed, and the modern objections to this doctrine. The Apostle said he felt bound to give thanks to God for the same. Predestination is that blessing which is bestowed upon them who believe in Christ, whereby they become adopted children of God, and joint heirs with Christ; and this is done according to the good pleasure of God's own will.—Eph 1:5.
"It is believed by some, that if the election is true, the doctrine of eternal reprobation is also true; but this by no means follows. We make no remarks on this doctrine, because we find no such doctrine in the Bible. We leave those who charge us with preaching that doctrine to give an account to God, of graces bestowed upon us in a holy calling, regeneration, sanctification and justification,

"God calls sinners with a holy calling, not according to their works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began,—2Ti 1:9. Through this calling God, by his spirit, quickens the soul that was dead in trespasses and sins, giving to it eternal life, creating it in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.—Eph 2:10.
"The soul being quickened together with Christ, possesses a godly sorrow for sin, and with a broken heart, a contrite spirit, humbly repents of its sins before God, the Holy Spirit sanctifying its affections from the love of sin to that of the love of holiness, by giving a holy disposition to the mind, and drawing it by love to Christ —thus the soul comes most willing to Christ, and thus by faith believes in Christ as offered in the Gospel— receives the forgiveness of his sins, justified from all things in the righteousness of Christ, and has peace with God.—
Ro 5:5; Ac 14:28; Isa 14:25; Ro 4:16. Thus the soul is born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.—Joh 1:13; 3:3.
"When Christ preached this doctrine the people murmured, and so they do yet. He told them in
Joh 6:44, 'No man can come unto me except the Father which hath sent me draw him'—but the creeds of men— made faith, tell poor sinners, that it rests upon their own voluntary acts. This contradiction we leave for the Lord to decide.
"The doctrine of glorification is of great consolation to the believer: he has a promise to be kept by the power of God, through faith, ready to be revealed in the last time.—
1Pe 1:5. The blessed Saviour said to his mourning disciples in Joh 14:19, 'Because I live ye shall live also.'

"The law by which the church is to be governed, is a part of that faith which we contend for. Every thing that God requires us to do. is plainly taught in the Bible, &c."

This circular was written by Elder Z. Reeves, the Moderator of the Association. There is no trace in the minutes of any further efforts against the faith—so the missionary spirit was again foiled.

The next attempt was made in 1847, through the Mississippi Baptist State Convention. A letter v/as addressed to the Association, asking aid to assist the weak churches within the State. Had she acted consistent with her settled course, and in accordance with her future peace, this letter would have been rejected. It was, however, referred to the churches, for them to kill with silence. This mode of disposing of the matter was understood by the Convention, and hence no more corresponding letters were sent.
But the missionary spirit was not so easily repulsed as the convention. The mere reception of that letter was considered something of a triumph. And the next session (1848) it procured the passage of a resolution, recommending to the churches the missionary society in the bounds of the Association. The next session (1849) they were so completely under the control of the missionary spirit, that they saw the near approach of the millenium, and passed a resolution to hurry it on with all possible speed. The proceedings of the session in 1850 is no better. Were we not bound by the truth of history to speak of these things we would gladly hide them in oblivion.

The reader, however, if he has paid strict attention to the history of this Association, is now prepared to understand, that it is composed of two people, struggling against each other, sometimes one having the ascendency, and sometimes the other.
 
The State Convention, above alluded to, is not that mentioned in the early part of the history of this Association, which perished for want of support, This Convention was gotten up by the New School Baptist, about the time the separation began to take place in this State.

GR014 THE PEAR RIVER ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XIV

PEARL RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

This Association is the second daughter of the Mississippi Baptist Association; the Union, being the first. The latter was organized before, and the former, after the Mother's session in 1820. Consequently the Union was represented by messengers in that session, but the Pearl River was not.

This Association adopted the Articles of Faith, Gospel Order, Rules of Decorum, and Powers of the Association, of the mother; and hence a repetition is deemed unnecessary. Moreover, as the general history, compiled from the minutes of the Mississippi Baptist Association, and comment thereon, relative to Missionism, equally apply to this Association, we shall omit every thing of that character.

1820.In November, the Association convened at Fair River church, Lawrence county—24 churches represented.

 "Eld. J. Thigpen preached the introductory sermon.

 "Eld. W. Cooper chosen Moderator and S. King, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Mississippi, Union and Bigby, (Ala.)"

1821.In September, the Association convened at Ebenezer church, Lawrence county—24 churches represented.

"Eld. Norvell Robertson preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. C. Collins chosen Moderator, and S. King, Clerk.

"Query.—What course should a church pursue to which, application is made for fellowship, by a person who has been a member of a sister church in a distant State, and removed to this State, excommunicated; but since believes that God has granted his repentance, and healed his backslidings?

"Answer.—We recommend, in all such cases, that such person be instructed to obtain a letter of dismission from the church to which he formerly belonged, if such church be in existence; if not, let the church to which the application is made, act discretionarily.

"Resolved, That we consider it inexpedient to have our Associations to be communion seasons."

Extract From the Circular Letter

"In order, therefore, that a sinner may be placed in a situation to perform good works, a change must be effected. The tree must be made good. Man must be made a new creature. This is the work of God. It is wrought by a power equal to that which created the world. The Apostle, addressing the saints at Ephesus, writes thus: 'Not of works lest any man should boast; for we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus, unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.'

"We see in the above passage, that the change under consideration, is described in the light of a creation—the workmanship of Him who created all things by Jesus Christ; and this creation must necessarily bear an analogy to the creation of the Universe. We likewise learn from the history of that event, given by Moses, that the word of God was alone employed in bringing all things into existence; and also, in the second creation the same word is employed, as saith the Apostle Peter, 1 Epistle i: 23.—'Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth forever.'

"Prior to this work the sinner is dead, as to spiritual things, and all the works that he performs are dead works; and thus he remains until life is imparted from Christ, who is the life of every believer; and the life which he imparts is eternal life; for power is given him of his Father, to 'give eternal life to as many as He hath given Him.'

"They are under the teaching of the Holy Spirit, the third person in the glorious trinity, by whom they are instructed, in a certain degree, into the knowledge of spiritual things, of which they were before ignorant. Among these is the moral law, which is enforced in its purity and spirituality, and convinces them of the exceeding sinfulness of sin, and the impurity of their own works, which fall infinitely short of justifying them in the sight of an infinitely pure and holy lav/ giver, who will accept of nothing from his creatures, but the perfection of holiness.

"In this extremity the Gospel points out the way of salvation, through the obedience of Him who has magnified the law, by presenting a righteousness which He completed when He arose from the dead; and which, when imputed to a sinner, is 'the fulfilling the law for righteousness.' This view of the atonement weans the sinner from all hopes of justification by works of righteousness, which he can do, and sets him to hungering and thirsting after the righteousness of Christ.

"In this frame of soul, the Gospel recognizes him as the character to whom the promises are made; and, at the time appointed by Infinite wisdom, he is enabled, by faith, to appropriate to himself, the blessings of salvation, ottered in the Gospel to such characters, which makes him rejoice in hope of eternal life. He is no longer under the law, but under grace, and therefore has the promise that sin shall not have dominion over him. Thus, being made a new creature, he feels himself under obligation to promote the glory of Him that loved him, and whom he loves in return, and is solicitous to know what He will have him to do. His inquiry now, is not 'What shall I do that I may be worthy;' but 'What shall I render unto the Lord for all his benefits.'

"He now performs his services from notions of obedience, flowing from love to God and man. He has received the spirit of adoption, and, as far as his proportion of faith will admit, he claims God as his Father, and desires to approve himself as an obedient and loving child. All he does in the way of obedience, is in the name of the Lord Jesus, through whom he hopes, that himself and his works will be accepted before the throne of God. All his petitions, thanksgivings, and acknowledgements, are offered up through Christ; and he looks for all necessary blessings to flow down to him through the same channel.

"We have sufficiently shown, in the preceding remarks, that the design of good works is not to justify or recommend a sinner to the favor of God; still it is presumed, that the Sovereign Judge of all the earth, had an important end designed in enjoining them both under the law and under the Gospel."

1822. In September the Association convened at New Chapel church, Pike county—24 churches represented.

Eld. N. Morris preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. D. Collins chosen Moderator, and S. King, Clerk.

"Took into consideration the petition from the African church, and, after due deliberation, it was

"Resolved, That brethren S. King, D. Cleveland and A. Harper, be appointed a committee to visit the said church, inquire into all the bearings which a late state law of this State has on them, in depriving them of their religious privileges; and to give them such advice as their circumstances may require.

"Resolved, unanimously. That the bethren D. Collins, S. King, G. W. King, and H. Runnels, be appointed a committee to memorialize the Legislature of this State, in behalf of this Association, for the repeal of so much of the said law as deprives our African churches of their religious privileges; and that the said committee wait on the Legislature at their next session with the said memorial.

"Resolved, unanimously. That we request the Mississippi and Union Baptist Associations to unite with us in memorializing the Legislature for the repeal of so much of said law as affects our African churches.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz, Mississippi, Union and Bigby. (Ala.)

"Appropriated twenty— five dollars to pay traveling expenses of corresponding messengers.

EXTRACTS FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER

 "Brethren in the Ministry:****

"In the mean time be careful for nothing. Cannot your heavenly Father clothe you from His bounty, and feed you out of his hand of benevolence? Your God is love, and you are the peculiar objects of his care! In him are treasured all temporal and spiritual blessings; and while in the faithful discharge of your duty 'Your bread shall be sure, and your water shall not fail.'

"Brethren of the churches:  ****

"Will you unfeelingly withhold your christian supplications and temporal means from your ministers, while they are toiling in the harvest of the Lord? No, brethren, we are pursuaded better things of you; and things which pertain to salvation."

1823.In September, the Association convened at Providence church, Marion county—29 churches represented.

Eld. D. Collins chosen Moderator, and S. King, Clerk.

Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Mississippi, Union and Beckbee, (Bigby, Ala.)

"Took up the petition from New Chapel church, on which

Resolved, That this Association approve of the conduct of the New Chapel church, in the excommunication of Thomas Willingham, formerly known as a Baptist preacher; and that the churches and Baptist connection are advised not to receive or encourage him as a preacher."

EXTRACT FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER

"The ordinary officers of the church, and the only ones now existing, are ministers and deacons. In the first Gospel churches there were other officers, such as Apostles, Prophets, and Evangelists, who were endowed with extraordinary gifts, which were then necessary for the confirmation of the Gospel; but are since become extinct."

1824.In September, the Association convened at Antioch church, Marion county—31 churches represented.

Eld. Norvall Robertson preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. D. Collins chosen Moderator, and A. G. Moore, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with the same three Associations.

"Appointed brethren Thigpen and Harvey to visit Mount Nebo church, and labor to set them in order, and report to the next Association—and brethren N. Morris and S. Coaker to vist Habolachitto and report in like manner.

"Resolved, That the Association reserve to herself the right of appointing the ministers to preach during the session."

1825. In September, the Association convened at Hebron church, Lawrence county—30 churches represented.

Eld. J. P. Martin preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. D. Collins, chosen Moderator, and A. G. Moore, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with the same three Associations.

"Resolved, That visiting members have no right to vote in a church, except invited by the church, and if invited, their vote should be considered valid.'

"Query from Ebenezer.—Do the Baptist Church permit their members to join the Masonic Lodge; or if members of that Lodge, to continue with them when they join the church?

"Answer.—This Association does not presume to decide the merits or demerits of Masonry; but recommend a strict observance of the Gospel discipline among the churches.

"Query from Half— Moon Bluff.—Is it consistent with Gospel order for a church to act in the reception or exclusion of a member—or in the administration of any of the ordinances of the Gospel without an ordained minister at her head.

"Answer.—There are certain duties and privileges belonging especially to the church; such as receiving members to fellowship, and excluding disorderly members from fellowship; but the administration of baptism, and the Lord's supper, belong exclusively to ordained ministers."

EXTRACTS FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER

"If we make our liberty a stumbling block to them that are weak, by indulging in things lawful, but which are not expedient, we justly provoke the Lord and his church to jealousy: we cause divisions and offences—and such the primitive christians were charged to avoid. When, in things which may be lawful, but not expedient, we sin against the brethren, by wounding their weak consciences, we sin against Christ. We abuse the spiritual law of liberty, by which we were made free from the law of sin and death. We become the authors of offences; and we know that a terrible woe is denounced against those by whom offences shall come.

"Instead of pulling together as a company of horses in Pharaoh's chariot, we leave the King's highway to crop the flowers—or in other words, to catch the alluring vanities of this world; such as worldly profit, worldly honors, and worldly wisdom. It is more profit to shield the tender conscience from a needless wound, than to gain the whole world. Let us leave worldly honors to be enjoyed by worldly men; let us despise them and seek only after the honors of God. Let us aspire after no other knowledge ourselves; and know nothing among our brethren saving Christ, and him crucified."

1826.In September, the Association convened at Hepzibah, Lawrence county—33 churches represented.

Eld. S. Coaker preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. J. Thigpen chosen Moderator, and A. G. Moore, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Mississippi, Union and Beckbee, (Ala.)

Query from Ebenezer Church—"Will Gospel discipline take under dealings any brother for attending the Masonic Lodge as a member of that Lodge, to the grief of his brother.

"Answered in the affirmative.

1827.In September, the Association convened at Bethlehem, Pike county—34 churches represented.

Eld. J. Thigpen chosen Moderator, and A. G. Moore, Clerk.

Elds. Felder, Collins, Newland and Mercer preached on Sunday in the order of their names.

"Correspondence arranged with the same three Associations.

1828. In September, the Associations convened at Bethany church, Lawrence county—34 churches represented.

Eld. J. Harvey, preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. J. Thigpen chosen Moderator, and N. Robertson, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Mississippi, Union and Bethlehem, (Beckbee, Ala.)

Remarks.—Having failed in all our efforts to procure any more minutes of this Association, we must refer the reader to the proceedings of the Mississippi Association, which we believe from various circumstances will protray the general character of this Association. This Association like that, is composed of two people struggling against each other; and, we persume, from facts within our knowledge, that it continues so even to this day. We could give many interesting incidents illustrative of this important truth; but as we wish to avoid all fabulous and uncertain statements, shaped to favor either party, we have chosen to confine ourselves strictly to record testimony.

It will be seen that the statutes of the State had become so rigid through the influence of the Missouri excitement, that in 1822 the Association resolved to memorialize the legislature in behalf of the religious privileges of the African churches. Previous to that time, they were permitted to have separate churches composed entirely of African members. But the course pursued by the northern people, led on by talented fools, has been such that personal safety to the white race, had rendered it necessary to clip the privileges of the black race, little by little, till now they are not even permitted to hold public worship by themselves. However much we may regret this state of affairs, yet, no man of sense and observation, who has marked the influence working on the minds of the black race, by the abolition movement, can possibly doubt the propriety of the State policy on the subject. In 1825 the subject of joining Masonic Lodges came up by a query from one of the churches, which was disposed of in as kind terms as could well be, to avoid giving offence. This answer was followed up with appropriate remarks in their circular letter, bearing directly on this and all such like subjects.

Thus they hoped no doubt, that this vexing question was finally settled. But in this they were sadly mistaken. The mild answer given was just such as to encourage the enemies of the church. Hence the controversy was continued. And in 1826 the question came up again, from one of the churches, in the following form viz; "Will gospel discipline take under dealings any brother for attending the Masonic Lodge as a member of that Lodge, to the grief of his brother—answered in the affirmative." This flat decision finally settled the question so far as the minutes in our possession show.

This decision, relative to Masonry, is in strict accordance with Regular or Old School Baptist usage, throughout the United States, wherever the question is raised. And we wish it remembered in certain quarters, that this decision of the Pearl River Association was made before the Primitive Baptist Association had an existence. And more than that were it necessary, we could give many other decisions, of a like character, and of older date, from various parts of the United States.

We are apprized of the fact, that it is charged by "the wise and prudent," that such decisions emanate from ignorance. This is not the place, were we so inclined, to vindicate the propriety of our course on this subject. It is sufficient for us here to say, that such decisions are in strict accordance with Primitive or Old School Baptist usage—and that, according to analogy of principles among honorable men, it is not exactly becoming in the members of one Fraternity, to condemn the rules of another, because those rules are an impediment to their own peculiar views. The Masons have rules, and they would not, it is presumed, abandon those rules, or any one of them, at the dictation of another society. It is the right of every sect, society, Denomination or Fraternity to fix the rules of their own government, so as not to infringe upon the rights of others—and for this privilege the Primitive Baptists will ever pray.

UNION ASSOCIATION.

1820. In September this Association was organized, and was the first off— spring of the old Mississippi Association. Mr. D. Benedict, in his late General History of the Baptists, has blundered into an error on this subject. The Union churches were the first to petition the Mother Association for dismission, and the first to organize. The Pearl River churches, however, petitioned at the same session, (1819) but, for some cause not explained in the minutes did not organize till November, 1820. We have not been able to procure a regular file of the minutes of the Union Association. But there has ever existed so close a harmony of action between this Pearl River, and the Mother Association, as shown by the minutes of the latter, that, so far as principle and character is concerned, the history of one, will substantially be the history of all three.

1830. In October, the Association convened at Elliott's meeting house church, Copiah county—31 churches represented.

Eld. W. Balfour preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. N. Morris chosen Moderator, and E. Hibbard, Clerk.

"On charge of Big Creek church against Union church, for slandering brother Samuel Marsh, and for immoral conduct—on motion.

"Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to examine into the truth of said charges.

"On complaint of Union church against Big Creek church, for refusing to give satisfaction on charges against brother Samuel Marsh, their Pastor—and the Association being satisfied that Big Creek church had been labored with according to the rules of the Gospel.

"On motion,

"Resolved, That we withdraw our fellowship with Big Creek church until reformed.

"On complaint against Liberty Church for disorderly conduct, and heresy in principle—on motion.

"Resolved, That this Association have no fellowship with said church until reformed.

"Resolved, That we hold no fellowship with Alexander Campbell, or any person who directly or indirectly promulgates his opinions.

"Resolved, That this Association have no fellowship with John H. Newland, nor Levi Thompson, for promulgating erroneous doctrines, and for receiving into the fellowship of Liberty church, members, who were excluded from a sister church for disorderly conduct, contrary to the express rules given by Christ in the Gospel, and the long— established custom of the Baptist Church.

"Resolved, That we consider Samuel Marsh, a Baptist minister belonging to Big Creek church, to be in disorder, and that we recommed to all churches not to countenance him as a preacher whilst in such disorder.

"Resolved, That every church belonging to this Association, be requested to send up to this body a transcript of their Articles of Faith, at our next meeting; and all churches who neglect or refuse to comply with this request, be considered in disorder.

"Query.—Is it Gospel order to ordain a minister at a distance from the church to which he belongs, and without their knowledge or consent.

"Answer.—No.

"The Association being notifed that Robert Currie is the subject of the above query—therefore

"Resolved, That the said Robert Currie is not an ordained minister.

"Correspondence arranged with the following Associations, viz: Mississippi, Pearl River and Leaf River.

"Resolved, That the Articles of Faith of this Association be printed with the minutes."*

1832. In October, the Association convened at Mount Bluff church, Madison county—32 churches represented.

Eld. J. Morris preached the introductory sermon.

* As they are substantially the same as those of the Mississippi Association, we can see no good reason for giving them a place.

Eld. E. Flowers chosen Moderator, and E. Hibbard, Clerk.

"The committee appointed at our last session on the case of Box Creek, and Yazoo Churches, submitted their report, which was received.

"Box Creek church, having sent up two letters and delegates, considered the subject, and, on motion,

Resolved, That we receive and recognize the minority as the Box Creek church.

"On motion,

"Resolved, That some record be made on our minutes of the standing of Brother Harmer; and, on motion of brother Joseph Morris,

"Resolved, That all the official acts of Dr. Wm. R. Harmer be considered as null and void, to all intents.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Mississippi, Peal River and Leaf River.

"Resolved, That we take into consideration the propriety of dividing our Association.*

EXTRACTS FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER.

"The Union of Churches.—The magnitude of the subject is such as to require better talents than we can command, and greater space than a circular address. We shall, therefore, only advert to a few particulars, and cite you to the word of God for a more comprehensive view.

"In reviewing this subject, we find that the Church is the body of Christ—a body which is composed of many members, and yet all in Union with each other and with the Head—so that the church is compared to the physical body—1 Cor. x; 17; Col. i; 18, And she is said to be but one.—Cant, vi: 9.

"While the church is presented in this compact as one body, yet, at the same time, she is presented as having many members and officers, differing, but the same spirit, so that while a part of the members of Christ's body are in Heaven, there are apart on earth, and yet but one body. And if the saints in heaven are in union with the saints on earth, how much more should there be union among those who are engaged in the warfare, whose common enemy is the same?

*Preliminary steps were taken at this session for organizing the Yazoo Association, which was constituted in November following, with churches from this body.

"But while we behold the church as one body, yet, at the same glance, we behold her scattered through all generations, and in all parts of the earth, from which it follows, that the body of Christ is mystical—although it is, in some degree, visible. Notwithstanding the members are scattered far and wide, yet they have the same head, who is gracious to all that call upon him. They all stand in the same relation; all need the same assistance from Christ the Head.

"Thus we see the Church in a scattered situation; for so her Head, who is the power and wisdom of God, has presented her; and has, for her benefit and comfort, promised that where two or three are gathered together in one place 'there am I with them.' Therefore, whereever there are a sufficient number of baptized believers to form a covenant to keep house for their Head, they are recognized as a dependant church. For so it was, that John was directed to write to the seven churches in Asia, where she is spoken of in the plural, as "Churches." While the church may have a number of different places, where she, in her different branches meet to worship and enjoy the blessings of the gospel, with ail its ordinances, yet she has but one Lord, one faith, and one baptism; for the Saviour sayeth, They are all in me.' Read Joh 17:11,21-22,23; Ro 12:21; 1Co 10:17; Col 3:15—from which you will learn, that the members of Christ's church form one body, of which Christ is the Head. They are one body and one spirit, even as they are called in one hope of their calling.

"And seeing such is the union, how straitly should all the members act in their different spheres for the glory of Christ the Head; and for the mutual happiness and comfort of each other. As every nerve, fibre, and muscle, when acting in its proper office, gives strength to the body, and receives vigor from the head—in like manner should we all act in concert in our different offices, for each other's strength, and growth in grace, and the glory of the Head.

"But how lamentable it is to think how little of this glorious doctrine is heard from our pulpits, and felt in our conference meetings! Were this doctrine urged more from the pulpit and press, and studied more by all the members of the body, we should not so often hear the ungospel declaration 'we are an independent body.'

Were this doctrine understood and put in practice, it would not be so often counteracted by churches, under the false notion of their being independent bodies.

"As the church is but one and all in union, there are means by which that union is to be maintained; and no doubt but Associations are some of them. We frequently find where churches have difficult matters before them, that they send enquiries up to their Associations concerning the case, snd obtain, perhaps, the best advice that could be had on the subject. And when we frequently find that the union of churches is rather destroyed than maintained by some of them refusing to follow that advice.

"But the most efficient means are faithful ministers; for Christ has compared his church to a flock of sheep; and God has promised that he will give them pastors according to his heart, that shall feed them with knowledge and understanding. The ministers, or pastors, ought, therefore, to be men of sound judgment in spiritual things; such as study to show themselves approved of God; workmen that need not be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth; such as speak the things which become sound doctrine; such as take the word of God for their rule of faith and practice; and from it, are able to bring forth such matter as is therein contained; such as will not teach for doctrines the traditions of men.

"Therefore, as much depends upon the pastor, churches should be very careful whom they put into that office. Not one, that cannot be received by sister churches; not one, who only has a gift of exhortation; not one, who has not a good report of them that are without; not one, who does not understand the principles of government in Christ's kingdom; for by all such the union of churches will be rather destroyed than maintained, and the cause of Christ rather retarded than advanced Therefore, much care should be taken not to call a man to office that God has not appointed.

"Again. The reading of the Scriptures, with earnest prayer, is very useful for those who wish to keep the unity of the spirit in the bonds of peace. Frequent conversation on divine things is also necessary; for 'they that feared the Lord, spake often one to another.' Therefore, those seasons should be frequent; and, for that purpose, brethren of the same faith and order should often visit each other, and enquire into the state of their souls; pray with and for one another; and converse freely upon the subject of God's everlasting love towards his people, and their obligation to love Him, and each other; at which times all vain and worldly considerations should be excluded. Brethren should also frequently visit sister churches, on their business days, and participate freely in their deliberations, with meekness and love; which conduct tends greatly to promote the union of churches.

"We shall in the next place call your attention to the means employed by the adversary of the church in opposition to the union of churches. Satan, also, has ministers, or agents, by whom, he carries on his dark designs with the utmost sagacity. And if Satan can transform himself into an angel of light, no marvel if his ministers should. It is, therefore, not only the policy of Satan to keep up disorder and confusion among his own subjects, but also, if possible, to introduce his dark designs into the kingdom of Christ; for disorder and confusion are the basis on which his kingdom will prosper. But still he has his own subjects under such complete control, that they are all acting for the promotion of his own, and the downfall of the kingdom of Christ. And his sagacity is such, that when open attempts fail, he will cloak his agents with the name of religion; and they, too, frequently appear to have a flaming zeal for the honor of Christ; but they speak evil of things which they understand not. They speak great swelling words of vanity, having men's persons in admiration because of advantage. These be they which separate themselves, having not the spirit. Read the epistle of Jude.

"Being thus cloaked under the name of religion, the world will follow them; for they are of the world, and the world will love its own. On this subject there is such a cloud of testimony, both in the word of God and the chronicle of the church, that we cannot be mistaken, We say cloud of testimony, and we shall here examine some of them. We have already requested you to read the epistle of Jude 1-25, which is quite short. We shall next call your attention to Peter: 'But there were false prophets among the people, as there shall be false teachers among you, who shall privily bring in damnable heresies; even denying the Lord that bought them; and bring upon themselves swift destruction. 2Pe 2:1. Paul calls them 'deceitful workers, transforming themselves into the Apostles of Christ.' 2Co 11:13—again; 'False brethren, who come in privily to spy out our liberty in Christ.' Ga 2:4—also, the Saviour: 'There shall arise false Christs and false prophets, and shall show great signs and wonders.'—Mt 24:24. 'By their fruits ye shall know them.—Mt 7:16.

"Thus, we have given a few of the many passages wherein those false teachers are spoken of as denying the Lord Jesus Christ. It is now our duty to enquire how they deny him. They do not act as Voltaire, Hume, Paine and Owen have done, but do it by setting the works and doctrines of devils, under the name of the doctrines of Christ. They pervert the Gospel of Christ, and worship and serve the creature more than the Creator.

"Here we shall pause and request you to notice the above recited testimony of Peter, viz: 'Who privily shall bring in damnable heresies'—in the plural, which plainly showeth that there is more than one kind of heresy. We shall now proceed to point ou t a few of those heresies among us, which we think do in their nature subvert the Christian faith and hope; and which have all come in disguise.

"First, we shall call your attention to the heresy of Campbellism—the denying and even ridiculing the allimportant doctrine of being born of the Spirit, and substituting in its place, baptism, as the insurance of the Holy Spirit and its influences. If this be true, why did Ananias and Sapphira lie to the Holy Ghost after they were baptized; and why do not these church troublers produce the fruits of the spirit, viz: "Love, joy, peace, long suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance,' &c. But continued observation proves them to be wolves in sheep's clothing; for wherever they have entered a Baptist church, such is the dire effect of their faith and practice, that instead of love, there is hatred; instead of joy, there is sorrow; instead of peace, there is confusion; and instead of gentleness, there is a wild ferocious disposition; so that the temple of God is defiled by the abomination of desolation standing where it ought not.

"Secondly, we now proceed to notice another heretical doctrine, propagated by those who call themselves Baptists, viz: A general atonement, but especially applied, (Fullerism, alias Missionism, alias New Schoolism,) which is such a contradiction in itself that a babe in Christ may see its fallacy. The error in this place must be in the term general; for Christ sayeth, 'All that the Father giveth me, shall come to me.' from whence it follows, that the receipts of the Saviour will be equivalent to his purchase. And if the atonement be general, why did Christ refuse to pray for the world? Why did he say to the Jews, 'Ye are not of my sheep, my sheep hear my voice,' &c?

"For such persons to be consistent with themselves, they should have the application as broad as the atonement. If they refuse to admit this position, then they are constrained by common sense and good reason to acknowledge that Christ purchased a people whom he never intended to save; or otherwise, a people whom he had not power to save; either of which will destroy the very essence of the God— head. One of these conclusions is, and must necessarily be, drawn from such premises. Yet, these wild, heretical notions have been, and are yet, a great bar to the union of churches.

"Therefore, seeing that so much of the confusion in churches arise from those who profess to be teachers, how particular ought the churches to be, not only in raising up young ministers, but also in receiving strangers? There should be a double guard put upon your pulpits: and while you are zealous for the faith of the Gospel be equally zealous for the discipline. You will generally find those who are unsound in faith, equally so in discipline."

1835.

In October, the Association convened at Elliott's meeting house church, Copiah county —24 churches represented.

Eld. J. Thigpen chosen Moderator, and N. R. Granberry, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from three Associations, viz: Mississippi, Pearl River and Yazoo.

"Correspondence arranged with the same three Associations, and also with Leaf River.

"The committee, appointed last year, by this Association, to meet committees from the Yazoo and Bethel Associations, to confer on the difficulties existing between the latter and the others, reported an 'Abstract of the proceeding of the joint committee, which is as follows: In pursuance of measures adopted by the Union, Yazoo, and Bethel Baptist Associations, at their respective late sessions, committees, on the part of each, met in conference on Friday, December 5, 1834, at Palestine church, Hinds county, Mississippi, for the purpose of taking into consideration the unhappy divisions which existed among them, and, if possible, to effect a reconciliation.

" 'The delegation from the Union submitted sundry matters of complaint against the Bethel, in which the Yazoo concurred. These were read, and the conference proceeded to investigate them separately. Finally the following was proposed and unanimously acceded to, viz: It is unanimously agreed, that we bear with and forget whatever has past; and that the Associations, as such, come into a state of reconciliation, leaving all matters of merely individual concernment to be settled in a Gospel way; and we recommend a like spirit and course to be exercised by churches and individuals—so far as the honor of God and the good of his kingdom on earth will admit of it,' &c.

"Whereas we believe that an institution of learning on the manual labor plan, under the control of the Baptists of this State, is at present loudly called for, and, as we have heard that efforts are making to establish such an institution, therefore,

"Resolved, That we recommend said institution to our friends generally, and especially to the churches composing this Association.

"Resolved, That the ministers of this Association be requested to visit all the churches in our bounds, by traveling two together, in the course of this year, if they can conveniently do so.

"Took under consideration the expediency of corresponding with the Bethel Association; and on taking the vote it appeared that a majority was in favor of said correspondence; but as there was a large minority, it was agreed to postpone the matter till next session."

REMARKS.—Although we have been able to procure only a few minutes of this Association, they are ample to show, that it, too, had hard struggles with the Campbellite and Fullerite heresies. The circular letter in 1832, if carefully read and studied, will give the intelligent reader important information relative to their troubled condition. This state of affairs was brought about by false brethren, who crept in unawares, and brought in damnable heresies; and then began to speak evil of those things which they know not; hence the way of truth was evil spoken of. Though these false brethren knew not the mystery of godliness—for if they had they would not have opposed the doctrine of grace—yet, they did know, that it was more compatible with natural justice and social harmony, to build up churches on their own faith, than to creep into Regular Baptist churches, under false pretences, and then contend against the very faith to which they had subscribed. This, however, has been the course of these New School brethren throughout the land; which has finally led to a separation in the greater part of the State. And as great efforts have been made to cast censure upon the Old School party, because they contend earnestly for the faith, we here, in the name of everything that is true, and just, and honorable, call upon the New School party to show one instance in which "Presdestinarian" Baptists have crept into Armenian churches and attempted to draw away members after them.

It will be seen that in 1835 this Association recommended to their friends and the churches an institution of learning of a peculiar kind. This was intended for the benefit of pious young men who had been called to the ministry before they were qualified. The Association seemed disposed to give them a chance to follow the example of Paul, by laboring with their own hands. This was admirably suited to test the depth of their piety. And, consequently, the whole plan fell to the ground for the want of patronage.

YAZOO BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

"Agreeably to a resolution of the Union Baptist Association, delegates assembled at Wallie's Creek meeting house, in Yazoo county, on the 2nd of November, 1832, from the following churches, viz: Yazoo, Yazoo county; Box Creek, Holmes county; Mount Gilead, Madison county; Mound Bluff, Madison county; Jerusalem, Yazoo county; Union, Hinds county; Tildebogue Madison county; Mount Pisgah, Rankin county.

"A sermon introductory to business, was delivered by brother Nathan Morris.

2. Elder N. Morris was called to the chair, and brother M. Crain requested to act as Clerk, pro tern.

3. On motion.

Resolved, That we enquire for the fellowship of churches.

4.    The Union church, having protested against the acts of the Union Association, as appeared from her letter was advised to remain a member of the Union Association until a reconciliation takes place. Also, the delegates from Mound Bluff, informing us that their church did not acquiesce in the proceedings of the Union Association, received the same advice.

5.    The delegates from Mount Pisgah, on account of some instruction given by their church, refused to take seats with us.

6.    Took under consideration the propriety of forming a new Association; and, after free discussion,

Resolved, That the churches now represented, form themselves into an Association.

 7. Appointed brethren Elder J. Morris, A. B. Sanders, and Maston Crain, a committee to prepare a constitution —which was accordingly done, read and unanimously agreed to—whereupon, the chairman gave to the several delegates present, the right hand of fellowship, and the Association was organized in proper form.

8.    Proceeded to elect a Moderator and Clerk. Elder Nathan Morris was chosen Moderator, and Maston Crain, Clerk.

9.    The Rules of Gospel Order, the Rules of Decorum, and the powers of the Association, as appended to these, minutes, were all severally read and adopted.

10.Took up the subject of correspondence, and agreed to correspond with the sister Associations of this State; also, with the Bethel Association. Appointed brethren N. Morris and M. Crain, delegates to the Union; Abner Erwin and A. B. Sanders to the Pearl River; J. Morris and Isaac Perkins to the Bethel; W. Taylor and J. Taylor to the Buttahatchy. Appointed J. Morris to write to the Leaf River, and A. B. Sanders to the Mississippi Association. Appointed the next Association to be held at Hickory Spring meeting house, in Holmes county.*

1833.

In November, the Association convened at Hickory Spring meeting house—6 churches represented, viz: Yazoo, Mount Gilead, Jerusalem, Tildebogue, Phalti, Holmes co., Bethel, Holmes co.

"Elder Nathan Morris was chosen Moderator, and brother M. Crain, Clerk."

"Correspondence was arranged with the following Associations, viz: Leaf River, Bethel, Pearl River, Union, Mississippi and Buttahatchy.

"On motion,

Resolved, That whereas Lee Compere, an ordained minister, has been excluded from Jerusalem church, for heresy and contempt of the church, in refusing to hear and receive her instructions; also, for administering the Lord's supper to a people not in fellowship with the Regular Baptists, and various other charges. That we highly approve of the course pursued by the church at Jerusalem—and whereas, we are informed, that said

*Here follow the Constitution, Articles of Faith, Gospel Order, and Rules of Decorum, which are similar to those of the Regular or O. S. Baptists generally. It may be well, however, in these days of apostacy from the truth, to give the three following articles of the faith, viz: 4. We believe in the everlasting love of God to His people; in the eternal, unconditional election of a definite number of the human family, to grace and glory. 5. We believe that sinners are justified in the sight of God, only by the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ; which is unto all, and upon all of them that believe. 6. We believe that all those who were chosen in Christ, before the foundation of the world, are in time effectually called, regenerated, converted and sanctified; and are kept by the power of God, through faith, unto salvation.

Compere has joined a church, once constituted upon our faith and order; but which has since apostatized: Therefore, we caution all regular Baptists to beware of said Compere.

"Preaching on the Lord's day by S. Perkins, N. Morris, G. W. Nolan and J. Morris.

"Resolved, That the Clerk superintend the printing and distribution of 400 copies of these minutes, and that he receive ten dollars for his services."

1834.

In November, the Association convened at the Jerusalem Church, in Yazoo county—10 churches represented.

"Elder Nathan Morris chosen Moderator, and J. C. Perkins, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with the following Associations, viz: Union, Pearl River, Mississippi, and Leaf River.

"Brother Norval Robertson addressed the Moderator. He said that he had been appointed a messenger of correspondence from the Mississippi Baptist Evangelizing Society, with a letter; but that he had mislaid the letter, so that he could not find it. Upon which, he was invited to a seat, and his aid solicited. It was also agreed to correspond with said society. Accordingly, appointed brethen Nathan Morris and Joseph Morris, Messengers; and brother Joseph Morris to write the corresponding letter to the said Society.

"The committee, appointed to take under consideration the letter from the Union Association, reported as follows, viz: We, the select committee, have conversed openly and freely with the corresponding brethren from the Union Association, upon the resolves found in their minutes, desiring us to meet them at some subsequent period and place, which we may appoint, for the purpose of opening some way, whereby the brethren sent from our sister, the Bethel Association, can have a fair and open opportunity of coming forward to the joint committee, to make known their grievances, if they have any, or for them, or any of them, to return and make confession of their wrong, and be restored to full fellowship, union and communion, with us and the Union Association.

(11)

  "We, therefore, appoint to meet them on Friday be fore the first Sunday in December next, at Palestine church, Hinds county, Mississippi.

 Delegates—J. Harvey, Abner Belcher, Joseph Morris, Nathaniel Robbins, J. C. Perkins, N. White, James Lee and William Denson.

1835.

In November, the Association convened at Tildebogue church, Madison county, Mississippi. The introductory sermon was preached by Eld. Abner Belcher, from Gal. i: 10, "For if I yet please men, I shall not be the servant of Christ." Without transacting any business of particular note, the Association adjourned to meet at Mount Gilead church, in same county, in May next.

Joseph Morris was chosen Moderator, and Daniel Sutherland, Clerk.

"Correspondence was arranged with the following Associations, viz: Pearl River, Union, Leaf River and Mississippi.

"Appointed Elder Joseph Morris to write to Choctaw Association; himself and Elder Abner Belcher, messengers.

"Appointed Elder Nathan Morris to write a letter to the Yallobusha Association, proposing consolidation. Should that object fail, to request a correspondence. Messengers—Elders Nathan Morris, Moses Crawson, Joel Harvey and Joseph Morris.

"A letter from Bethel Association soliciting correspondence, was read and rejected. Elders Nathan Morris, Joseph Morris and brother Silas Mercer were appointed a committee to report a statement of facts, why it was rejected.

"Report.—1. We believe that the Bethel Association was organized in disorder, from the fact that some of the churches belonging to that body—having been dismissed from the Union, for the purpose of organizing a new Association—protested against the Union, and then refused to return to the Union and labor for a reconciliation, although advised to that course by the Yazoo Associational Convention.

"2. We believe it disorder in the Bethel to recognize William B. Harmer, as a Baptist preacher, after a nonfellowship had been declared by the Phalti church, and that non— fellowship had been recognized by the Union and Yazoo Associations.

"3. We believe it a disorder in the Bethel to sustain the official acts of Lee Compere, after having acknowledged at the Palestine Convention in 1834, that Mound Bluff church had done wrong in the reception of said Compere, and he under the sentence of excommunication by Jerusalem church.

"4. We believe it disorder in the Bethel to sustain the churches of their body, in the reception of persons excluded from the churches of our body for immoral conduct.

"5. We believe it disorder in the Bethel to hold a church in their fellowship, constituted in the bounds of another Baptist church—members being received in said newly constituted church, belonging to the old church, without letters of dismission.

"6. We believe that the Bethel is in disorder in recognizing the majority of the Box Creek church, or a part of them, as members of the Baptist order, after they had been rejected by the Union Association for gross immoralities.

"These are some of the reasons why we cannot open associational correspondence with the Bethel; and should our brethren think us extravagant in the above statement, we hold ourselves bound to establish the facts by Gospel testimony, before any regular tribunal of the Baptist order, formed for that purpose.

"The report was read and adopted—9 churches represented.

1836.

In November, the Association convened at Carrollton, Carroll county, Mississippi—10 churches represented.

"Eld. Nathan Morris chosen Moderator, and M. Crain, Clerk.

"Correspondence.—A letter and package of minutes received from the Union by her messenger, brother Allen—a letter and minutes from the Mississippi, Pearl River, Choctaw, and also from the Yallobusha by delegates, viz: Francis Baker, H. McNeal, E. Sullivan and Wm. Kennedy.

"Correspondence arranged with the following Associations, viz: Mississippi, Union, Pearl River, Leaf River, Choctaw and Yallobusha.

"Took into consideration the propriety of consolidating with the Yallobusha Association—whereupon

Resolved, That we recommend the churches of our body, to meet in convention with the churches of the Yallobusha Association, at Rocky Springs, on Friday before the 3d Sunday in May next, and that if a majority of the two Associations agree to consolidate, then this Association to be dissolved.

Churches.—Emmaus, Mt. Gilead, Tildebogue, Phalti, Bethel, Rocky Spring, Doak's Creek, Mt. Carmel, Yazoo and Hebron. Association fund $3; Contribution by the churches, $87—$90; paid for printing these minutes, $40; for superintending the same $15—$55. Balance in treasury, $35.

YALLOBUSHA ASSOCIATION.

This Association was organized in 1836, but we. have not been able to obtain the minutes of that year—therefore we commence with the succeeding.

1837.

In October, the Association convened at Shiloh Church, Yallobusha county—4 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker chosen Moderator, and W. Minter, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from Zion Baptist Association.

"Elds. F. Baker, M. White and Moore preached on Sunday.

"Correspondence returned to Zion Baptist Association.

"On motion,

"Resolved. That we drop, for the present, the correspondence with the Yazoo Baptist Association.

"Resolved, That we renew the correspondence with Choctaw Baptist Association, which was dropped last year in prospect of uniting the Yazoo and this Association in one."

1838.In October, the Association convened at Lebanon Church, Yallobusha county—10 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker chosen Moderator, and J. G. Hall, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with Zion Association.

"Whereas, it has been represented to this body, that the church at Shiloh has infringed on the terms of her union with this body, by receiving an excluded member into her fellowship—Therefore,

"Resolved, That Brethren Robins, Taylor, Sullivan, Minter, Baker, Hall, Littleton, Whitsett, Freeman and Donham, be appointed a committee to inquire if the church at Shiloh has not departed from Scriptural discipline and Baptist order, by receiving into her fellowship an excluded member, and that they report all the facts to the next Association.

"Resolved. That the churches composing this Assocition be requested to send up contributions for the purpose of bearing the expenses of our delegates to sister Associations."

The circular letter prepared by Brother Francis Baker was reported by the committee appointed to examine it, and then read and ordered to be printed with the minutes.

CIRCULAR ADDRESS.

"Dear Brethren: You have been so often addressed  through the medium of circulars, that we are at a loss for a subject for the present; and we have thought of none more appropriate, under existing circumstances, than that very impressive admonition of the great Apostle of the Gentiles, "Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom." We would not have you to understand by the word of Christ, that the Apostle meant that "Word which was made flesh and dwelt among us," but the revealed word or will of God, the Gospel of his Son.

"It is remarkable that the Scriptures, or word of Christ, have become the text book of the age; and yet we are astonished at the prevailing ignorance with regard to their contents. They are quoted by all classes in Christendom. The statesman, the gentleman at the bar, the politician and the humble peasant, often quote the Bible on various occasions. Yea, the drunkard too, will hold, his cup in his hand, and delay swallowing the intoxicating draught, till he quotes the Bible; and his quotations may as likely be found in the Alcoran as in the Scriptures. And yet, painful to say, he is as apt to make correct and appropriate quotations as many who profess Christ. When we hear misquotations at the bar, or read them in the speeches of gentlemen in the halls of legislation we are not so much astonished; but when we hear egregious errors and misquotations by christians, and especially by preachers, we are disgusted—and think the admonition appropriate, "Let the word of Christ dwell in you." By frequent misquotation of the Scriptures we betray our ignorance of the Bible; an ignorance more inexcusable because our opportunities are good, and the means ample to obtain the blessing of the richness of the word of Christ. One of the blessings we appropriate to ourselves by letting the word of Christ dwell in us, is, that the wisdom it imparts lights up the path of life, and enables us to walk in the light of his countenance. David hath said, "Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light to my path.

"The wisdom that the word of Christ imparts is not only a director in the externals of religion, but it illuminates the understanding, and enables us to discover the hope of our calling, and brightens our evidences in Christ. It also teaches us our own weakness, and learns us to trust in the Lord.

"The wisdom of the word of Christ enables us to discern between truth and error; between the Spirit of Christ and the Spirit of anti— Christ; between the church of the living God and the mystic Babylon. It is this wisdom that teaches and enables us to serve and to worship God acceptably: and to discharge our duties to the Lord and one another—thereby enjoying the answer of a good conscience before God, and that peace of mind "which passeth all understanding." That christian whose mind is richly stored with the wisdom of the word, possesses in a very high degree the advantage of hearing and enjoying the blessing of the gospel, over those who are not in possession, and are ignorant, of the wisdom of the word. With what an amazing difference, and ease, can the servant of God preach to an enlightened and Bible taught congregation, to what he can to a people ignorant and unskilled in the word. The instructed and intelligent hearer hears with diligence, tries by the standard, and receives the truth in the love of it, and rejoices in the saving benefits; while the ignorant and uniformed sits careless and uninterested; nor can the preacher charm or interest them, though he tune and play ever so wisely on every string of the Gospel. How appropriate, then, the admonition, "Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom.

"The great question, then, is, how shall we obtain this rich treasure? 1. By a prayerful search of the Scriptures; for the good Lord hath said, "If any man lack wisdom, let him ask of God who giveth to all men liberally and unbraideth not." Yet it is not to be expected that this wisdom is to be revealed directly from Heaven, aside from the word of God; for then Christ need not to have charged us to "search the Scriptures." And the wise man would have spoken folly when he said, "For the commandment is a lamp, and the law is light."— Pr 6:23. Nor need we expect to obtain the treasure by a search of the Scriptures without the light of the Holy Spirit; but through the light of the Spirit, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world, and which shineth at the same time more perfectly through the whole volume of inspiration, we may hope to obtain this wisdom. The means to be used as stated above, are to search, study, labor, and compare Scripture with Scripture—those parts that treat of the same subject or principles, with each other; and not confound sentences or passages on one subject, with those relating to another— thereby wresting them from their true meaning.

"2. The wisdom contained in the word may be obtained by a studious attention to the light of experience; for christian experience always accords with, and sheds much light on the Scriptures; and the Gospel explains both the Scriptures and christian experience—for the same Spirit that revealed the word of God to 'holy men of old,' also revealed the Son of God in our souls. And our blessed Lord hath promised us that it shall 'abide with us forever,' and 'lead us into all truth,' and bring to our 'rememberance all things whatsoever he hath told us.' Thus the teachings of the Spirit of God in our souls and the teachings of the word of God are the same, It is thus that our souls know that the word of God is true; and it is through the wisdom of the word that we are taught to 'approve the things that are most excellent.'

"Again, we are informed in the Scripture that, 'He that believeth on the Son of God hath the witness in himself.' By a close attention to the testimony of this witness in us, and an application to the Scriptures, we 'Let the word of Christ dwell in us richly with all wisdom, teaching,' &c; and we receive and enjoy all the blessings and consolations of the Gospel, while our souls are made to feast on the heavenly manna, and drink out of those deep wells of salvation. It teaches, also, to look for the coming of our Lord, who shall change our vile bodies into the likeness of the glorious body of the Son of God; and that we shall have a name and a place in the New Jerusalem, the City of the living God—the General Assembly and Church of the First Born—there to see and embrace our crucified, but now glorified and much beloved Lord.

"Beloved brethren! We have presented you with a few things by way of admonition, to stir up your pure minds by way of rememberance; and may the God of peace and love, who brought again our Lord Jesus from the dead, keep and preserve you for his heavenly Kingdom. Amen."

1839.

In October, the Association convened at Loosascoona Church, Yallobusha county—10 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker, chosen Moderator, and J. G. Hall, Clerk.

"Elds. Parks, Meaders, Stovall, and Baker, preached on Sunday, in the order of their names.

"Corresponding letters called for. None were presented.

"Resolved, That for the present we drop all correspondence with sister Associations, owing to the condition of our own body.

"Resolved, That Brethren Baker, Minter and Hall, be appointed to superintend the printing of 300 copies of our minutes; and that they annex to said minutes, the constitution, rules of decorum, and abstract of the faith of this Association.

"Brother Hall reported that he had not found it convenient to prepare a circular letter, according to appointment. He, however, presented and read a selection on that subject, but the Association did not deem it expedient to adopt and publish it as their circular."

REMARKS.—We shall now drop this Association. Hitherto, she has been orthodox in her faith and orderly in her practice. So far as their minutes show, rnissionism has not so much as been mentioned among them. But at this session, the missionary spirit manifested itself furiously. Though the minutes of this session indicate nothing of the kind, yet we learn from letters written at the time, that great excitement and disorder prevailed. An eye witness, who belonged not to the Association, says: "I was also at the Yallobusha Association, and saw more confusion than I ever saw in a religious assembly before; and I thought that the Missionaries tried to take as many advantages of the Old Baptists as Demetrius did of Paul.

Another letter writer, who belonged to another Association, under date of November 17, 1839, says: "I came from thence to the Yallobusha Association, and for me, or any other man to give a correct record of all the proceedings of that assembly would be impossible. I have never in all my life been a witness of such a scene among professors of religion, much less among people calling themselves Baptists. The plain truth is, there were two kinds of people, (to— wit:) Sarah's children and Hagar's; and you, nor I, ever saw the two families together, but what there was mocking and discord and confusion, in lieu of brotherly love and kindness and fellowship.

"I heard one of the well known divines in that Association say, that it would never do for the Baptists to split; for the Lord had given the world to the Baptists, and he could not leave the Baptists. He went on to state that he had been preparing, for some length of time, perhaps six months, to discuss the Missionary question at that Association; and that he was prepared to show, that the anti— Missionaries were nothing more nor less than Roman Catholics, and were actuated by the same spirit.

"Now, brethren, can you not see, without "specs," what sort of love he had for the Old Baptists? Old School Baptists, did you notice those remarks? This is the best compliment you get for all your exertions to keen peace and love with them. As soon as they think they have a majority, the best name you can get from them is Roman Catholics, and are actuated by the same spirit.

"I think it is high time the Old School Baptists were looking at the motto of the Primitive, and obeying the call that says, 'Come out of her my people.' The foregoing with many other harsh speeches were thrown out by the learned gentry of the bar, at that time and place. And finally, the Association left the place in confusion. The old School Baptists repaired to Brother Johnson's about five miles from the place, and entered into an agreement to meet in convention on Friday before the fifth Sabbath in May next, to form a new Association."

The Yallobusha Association was composed of ten churches, five of which withdrew—one united with the Primitive Association, and the others formed the Loosascoona Association.

GR015 UNION ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XV

UNION ASSOCIATION

1820.

In September this Association was organized, and was the first off— spring of the old Mississippi Association. Mr. D. Benedict, in his late General History of the Baptists, has blundered into an error on this subject. The Union churches were the first to petition the Mother Association for dismission, and the first to organize. The Pearl River churches, however, petitioned at the same session, (1819) but, for some cause not explained in the minutes did not organize till November, 1820. We have not been able to procure a regular file of the minutes of the Union Association. But there has ever existed so close a harmony of action between this Pearl River, and the Mother Association, as shown by the minutes of the latter, that, so far as principle and character is concerned, the history of one, will substantially be the history of all three.

1830.

In October, the Association convened at Elliott's meeting house church, Copiah county—31 churches represented.

Eld. W. Balfour preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. N. Morris chosen Moderator, and E. Hibbard, Clerk.

"On charge of Big Creek church against Union church, for slandering brother Samuel Marsh, and for immoral conduct—on motion.

"Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to examine into the truth of said charges.

"On complaint of Union church against Big Creek church, for refusing to give satisfaction on charges against brother Samuel Marsh, their Pastor—and the Association being satisfied that Big Creek church had been labored with according to the rules of the Gospel.

"On motion,

"Resolved, That we withdraw our fellowship with Big Creek church until reformed.

"On complaint against Liberty Church for disorderly conduct, and heresy in principle—on motion.

"Resolved, That this Association have no fellowship with said church until reformed.

"Resolved, That we hold no fellowship with Alexander Campbell, or any person who directly or indirectly promulgates his opinions.

"Resolved, That this Association have no fellowship with John H. Newland, nor Levi Thompson, for promulgating erroneous doctrines, and for receiving into the fellowship of Liberty church, members, who were excluded from a sister church for disorderly conduct, contrary to the express rules given by Christ in the Gospel, and the long— established custom of the Baptist Church.

"Resolved, That we consider Samuel Marsh, a Baptist minister belonging to Big Creek church, to be in disorder, and that we recommed to all churches not to countenance him as a preacher whilst in such disorder.

"Resolved, That every church belonging to this Association, be requested to send up to this body a transcript of their Articles of Faith, at our next meeting; and all churches who neglect or refuse to comply with this request, be considered in disorder.

"Query.—Is it Gospel order to ordain a minister at a distance from the church to which he belongs, and without their knowledge or consent.

"Answer.—No.

"The Association being notifed that Robert Currie is the subject of the above query—therefore

"Resolved, That the said Robert Currie is not an ordained minister.

"Correspondence arranged with the following Associations, viz: Mississippi, Pearl River and Leaf River.

"Resolved, That the Articles of Faith of this Association be printed with the minutes."*

1832.

In October, the Association convened at Mount Bluff church, Madison county—32 churches represented.

Eld. J. Morris preached the introductory sermon.

* As they are substantially the same as those of the Mississippi Association, we can see no good reason for giving them a place.

Eld. E. Flowers chosen Moderator, and E. Hibbard, Clerk.

"The committee appointed at our last session on the case of Box Creek, and Yazoo Churches, submitted their report, which was received.

"Box Creek church, having sent up two letters and delegates, considered the subject, and, on motion,

Resolved, That we receive and recognize the minority as the Box Creek church.

"On motion,

"Resolved, That some record be made on our minutes of the standing of Brother Harmer; and, on motion of brother Joseph Morris,

"Resolved, That all the official acts of Dr. Wm. R. Harmer be considered as null and void, to all intents.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Mississippi, Peal River and Leaf River.

"Resolved, That we take into consideration the propriety of dividing our Association.*

EXTRACTS FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER.

"The Union of Churches.—The magnitude of the subject is such as to require better talents than we can command, and greater space than a circular address. We shall, therefore, only advert to a few particulars, and cite you to the word of God for a more comprehensive view.

"In reviewing this subject, we find that the Church is the body of Christ—a body which is composed of many members, and yet all in Union with each other and with the Head—so that the church is compared to the physical body—1Co 10:17; Col 1:18, And she is said to be but one.—Song 6:9.

"While the church is presented in this compact as one body, yet, at the same time, she is presented as having many members and officers, differing, but the same spirit, so that while a part of the members of Christ's body are in Heaven, there are apart on earth, and yet but one body. And if the saints in heaven are in union with the saints on earth, how much more should there be union among those who are engaged in the warfare, whose common enemy is the same?

*Preliminary steps were taken at this session for organizing the Yazoo Association, which was constituted in November following, with churches from this body.

"But while we behold the church as one body, yet, at the same glance, we behold her scattered through all generations, and in all parts of the earth, from which it follows, that the body of Christ is mystical—although it is, in some degree, visible. Notwithstanding the members are scattered far and wide, yet they have the same head, who is gracious to all that call upon him. They all stand in the same relation; all need the same assistance from Christ the Head.

"Thus we see the Church in a scattered situation; for so her Head, who is the power and wisdom of God, has presented her; and has, for her benefit and comfort, promised that where two or three are gathered together in one place 'there am I with them.' Therefore, whereever there are a sufficient number of baptized believers to form a covenant to keep house for their Head, they are recognized as a dependant church. For so it was, that John was directed to write to the seven churches in Asia, where she is spoken of in the plural, as "Churches." While the church may have a number of different places, where she, in her different branches meet to worship and enjoy the blessings of the gospel, with ail its ordinances, yet she has but one Lord, one faith, and one baptism; for the Saviour sayeth, They are all in me.' Read #John 17:11,21,22,23; Rom 12:45: 1Cor 10:17; Col 3:15|—from which you will learn, that the members of Christ's church form one body, of which Christ is the Head. They are one body and one spirit, even as they are called in one hope of their calling.

"And seeing such is the union, how straitly should all the members act in their different spheres for the glory of Christ the Head; and for the mutual happiness and comfort of each other. As every nerve, fibre, and muscle, when acting in its proper office, gives strength to the body, and receives vigor from the head—in like manner should we all act in concert in our different offices, for each other's strength, and growth in grace, and the glory of the Head.

"But how lamentable it is to think how little of this glorious doctrine is heard from our pulpits, and felt in our conference meetings! Were this doctrine urged more from the pulpit and press, and studied more by all the members of the body, we should not so often hear the ungospel declaration 'we are an independent body.'

Were this doctrine understood and put in practice, it would not be so often counteracted by churches, under the false notion of their being independent bodies.

"As the church is but one and all in union, there are means by which that union is to be maintained; and no doubt but Associations are some of them. We frequently find where churches have difficult matters before them, that they send enquiries up to their Associations concerning the case, snd obtain, perhaps, the best advice that could be had on the subject. And when we frequently find that the union of churches is rather destroyed than maintained by some of them refusing to follow that advice.

"But the most efficient means are faithful ministers; for Christ has compared his church to a flock of sheep; and God has promised that he will give them pastors according to his heart, that shall feed them with knowledge and understanding. The ministers, or pastors, ought, therefore, to be men of sound judgment in spiritual things; such as study to show themselves approved of God; workmen that need not be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth; such as speak the things which become sound doctrine; such as take the word of God for their rule of faith and practice; and from it, are able to bring forth such matter as is therein contained; such as will not teach for doctrines the traditions of men.

"Therefore, as much depends upon the pastor, churches should be very careful whom they put into that office. Not one, that cannot be received by sister churches; not one, who only has a gift of exhortation; not one, who has not a good report of them that are without; not one, who does not understand the principles of government in Christ's kingdom; for by all such the union of churches will be rather destroyed than maintained, and the cause of Christ rather retarded than advanced Therefore, much care should be taken not to call a man to office that God has not appointed.

"Again. The reading of the Scriptures, with earnest prayer, is very useful for those who wish to keep the unity of the spirit in the bonds of peace. Frequent conversation on divine things is also necessary; for 'they that feared the Lord, spake often one to another.' Therefore, those seasons should be frequent; and, for that purpose, brethren of the same faith and order should often visit each other, and enquire into the state of their souls; pray with and for one another; and converse freely upon the subject of God's everlasting love towards his people, and their obligation to love Him, and each other; at which times all vain and worldly considerations should be excluded. Brethren should also frequently visit sister churches, on their business days, and participate freely in their deliberations, with meekness and love; which conduct tends greatly to promote the union of churches.

"We shall in the next place call your attention to the means employed by the adversary of the church in opposition to the union of churches. Satan, also, has ministers, or agents, by whom, he carries on his dark designs with the utmost sagacity. And if Satan can transform himself into an angel of light, no marvel if his ministers should. It is, therefore, not only the policy of Satan to keep up disorder and confusion among his own subjects, but also, if possible, to introduce his dark designs into the kingdom of Christ; for disorder and confusion are the basis on which his kingdom will prosper. But still he has his own subjects under such complete control, that they are all acting for the promotion of his own, and the downfall of the kingdom of Christ. And his sagacity is such, that when open attempts fail, he will cloak his agents with the name of religion; and they, too, frequently appear to have a flaming zeal for the honor of Christ; but they speak evil of things which they understand not. They speak great swelling words of vanity, having men's persons in admiration because of advantage. These be they which separate themselves, having not the spirit. Read the epistle of Jude.

"Being thus cloaked under the name of religion, the world will follow them; for they are of the world, and the world will love its own. On this subject there is such a cloud of testimony, both in the word of God and the chronicle of the church, that we cannot be mistaken, We say cloud of testimony, and we shall here examine some of them. We have already requested you to read the epistle of Jude, which is quite short. We shall next call your attention to Peter: 'But there were false prophets among the people, as there shall be false teachers among you, who shall privily bring in damnable heresies; even denying the Lord that bought them; and bring upon themselves swift destruction. 2Pe 2:1. Paul calls them 'deceitful workers, transforming themselves into the Apostles of Christ.' 2Co 11:13—again; 'False brethren, who come in privily to spy out our liberty in Christ.' Ga 2:4—also, the Saviour: 'There shall arise false Christs and false prophets, and shall show great signs and wonders.'—Mt 24:24. 'By their fruits ye shall know them.—Mt 7:16.

"Thus, we have given a few of the many passages wherein those false teachers are spoken of as denying the Lord Jesus Christ. It is now our duty to enquire how they deny him. They do not act as Voltaire, Hume, Paine and Owen have done, but do it by setting the works and doctrines of devils, under the name of the doctrines of Christ. They pervert the Gospel of Christ, and worship and serve the creature more than the Creator.

"Here we shall pause and request you to notice the above recited testimony of Peter, viz: 'Who privily shall bring in damnable heresies'—in the plural, which plainly showeth that there is more than one kind of heresy. We shall now proceed to point ou t a few of those heresies among us, which we think do in their nature subvert the Christian faith and hope; and which have all come in disguise.

"First, we shall call your attention to the heresy of Campbellism—the denying and even ridiculing the allimportant doctrine of being born of the Spirit, and substituting in its place, baptism, as the insurance of the Holy Spirit and its influences. If this be true, why did Ananias and Sapphira lie to the Holy Ghost after they were baptized; and why do not these church troublers produce the fruits of the spirit, viz: "Love, joy, peace, long suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance,' &c. But continued observation proves them to be wolves in sheep's clothing; for wherever they have entered a Baptist church, such is the dire effect of their faith and practice, that instead of love, there is hatred; instead of joy, there is sorrow; instead of peace, there is confusion; and instead of gentleness, there is a wild ferocious disposition; so that the temple of God is defiled by the abomination of desolation standing where it ought not.

"Secondly, we now proceed to notice another heretical doctrine, propagated by those who call themselves Baptists, viz: A general atonement, but especially applied, (Fullerism, alias Missionism, alias New Schoolism,) which is such a contradiction in itself that a babe in Christ may see its fallacy. The error in this place must be in the term general; for Christ sayeth, 'All that the Father giveth me, shall come to me.' from whence it follows, that the receipts of the Saviour will be equivalent to his purchase. And if the atonement be general, why did Christ refuse to pray for the world? Why did he say to the Jews, 'Ye are not of my sheep, my sheep hear my voice,' &c?

"For such persons to be consistent with themselves, they should have the application as broad as the atonement. If they refuse to admit this position, then they are constrained by common sense and good reason to acknowledge that Christ purchased a people whom he never intended to save; or otherwise, a people whom he had not power to save; either of which will destroy the very essence of the God— head. One of these conclusions is, and must necessarily be, drawn from such premises. Yet, these wild, heretical notions have been, and are yet, a great bar to the union of churches.

"Therefore, seeing that so much of the confusion in churches arise from those who profess to be teachers, how particular ought the churches to be, not only in raising up young ministers, but also in receiving strangers? There should be a double guard put upon your pulpits: and while you are zealous for the faith of the Gospel be equally zealous for the discipline. You will generally find those who are unsound in faith, equally so in discipline."

1835. In October, the Association convened at Elliott's meeting house church, Copiah county —24 churches represented.

Eld. J. Thigpen chosen Moderator, and N. R. Granberry, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from three Associations, viz: Mississippi, Pearl River and Yazoo.

"Correspondence arranged with the same three Associations, and also with Leaf River.

"The committee, appointed last year, by this Association, to meet committees from the Yazoo and Bethel Associations, to confer on the difficulties existing between the latter and the others, reported an 'Abstract of the proceeding of the joint committee, which is as follows: In pursuance of measures adopted by the Union, Yazoo, and Bethel Baptist Associations, at their respective late sessions, committees, on the part of each, met in conference on Friday, December 5, 1834, at Palestine church, Hinds county, Mississippi, for the purpose of taking into consideration the unhappy divisions which existed among them, and, if possible, to effect a reconciliation.

" 'The delegation from the Union submitted sundry matters of complaint against the Bethel, in which the Yazoo concurred. These were read, and the conference proceeded to investigate them separately. Finally the following was proposed and unanimously acceded to, viz: It is unanimously agreed, that we bear with and forget whatever has past; and that the Associations, as such, come into a state of reconciliation, leaving all matters of merely individual concernment to be settled in a Gospel way; and we recommend a like spirit and course to be exercised by churches and individuals—so far as the honor of God and the good of his kingdom on earth will admit of it,' &c.

"Whereas we believe that an institution of learning on the manual labor plan, under the control of the Baptists of this State, is at present loudly called for, and, as we have heard that efforts are making to establish such an institution, therefore,

"Resolved, That we recommend said institution to our friends generally, and especially to the churches composing this Association.

"Resolved, That the ministers of this Association be requested to visit all the churches in our bounds, by traveling two together, in the course of this year, if they can conveniently do so.

"Took under consideration the expediency of corresponding with the Bethel Association; and on taking the vote it appeared that a majority was in favor of said correspondence; but as there was a large minority, it was agreed to postpone the matter till next session."

REMARKS.—Although we have been able to procure only a few minutes of this Association, they are ample to show, that it, too, had hard struggles with the Campbellite and Fullerite heresies. The circular letter in 1832, if carefully read and studied, will give the intelligent reader important information relative to their troubled condition. This state of affairs was brought about by false brethren, who crept in unawares, and brought in damnable heresies; and then began to speak evil of those things which they know not; hence the way of truth was evil spoken of. Though these false brethren knew not the mystery of godliness—for if they had they would not have opposed the doctrine of grace—yet, they did know, that it was more compatible with natural justice and social harmony, to build up churches on their own faith, than to creep into Regular Baptist churches, under false pretences, and then contend against the very faith to which they had subscribed. This, however, has been the course of these New School brethren throughout the land; which has finally led to a separation in the greater part of the State. And as great efforts have been made to cast censure upon the Old School party, because they contend earnestly for the faith, we here, in the name of everything that is true, and just, and honorable, call upon the New School party to show one instance in which "Presdestinarian" Baptists have crept into Armenian churches and attempted to draw away members after them.

It will be seen that in 1835 this Association recommended to their friends and the churches an institution of learning of a peculiar kind. This was intended for the benefit of pious young men who had been called to the ministry before they were qualified. The Association seemed disposed to give them a chance to follow the example of Paul, by laboring with their own hands. This was admirably suited to test the depth of their piety. And, consequently, the whole plan fell to the ground for the want of patronage.

YAZOO BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

"Agreeably to a resolution of the Union Baptist Association, delegates assembled at Wallie's Creek meeting house, in Yazoo county, on the 2nd of November, 1832, from the following churches, viz: Yazoo, Yazoo county; Box Creek, Holmes county; Mount Gilead, Madison county; Mound Bluff, Madison county; Jerusalem, Yazoo county; Union, Hinds county; Tildebogue Madison county; Mount Pisgah, Rankin county.

"A sermon introductory to business, was delivered by brother Nathan Morris.

2. Elder N. Morris was called to the chair, and brother M. Crain requested to act as Clerk, pro tern.

3. On motion.

Resolved, That we enquire for the fellowship of churches.

4.    The Union church, having protested against the acts of the Union Association, as appeared from her letter was advised to remain a member of the Union Association until a reconciliation takes place. Also, the delegates from Mound Bluff, informing us that their church did not acquiesce in the proceedings of the Union Association, received the same advice.

5.    The delegates from Mount Pisgah, on account of some instruction given by their church, refused to take seats with us.

6.    Took under consideration the propriety of forming a new Association; and, after free discussion,

Resolved, That the churches now represented, form themselves into an Association.

 7. Appointed brethren Elder J. Morris, A. B. Sanders, and Maston Crain, a committee to prepare a constitution —which was accordingly done, read and unanimously agreed to—whereupon, the chairman gave to the several delegates present, the right hand of fellowship, and the Association was organized in proper form.

8.    Proceeded to elect a Moderator and Clerk. Elder Nathan Morris was chosen Moderator, and Maston Crain, Clerk.

9.    The Rules of Gospel Order, the Rules of Decorum, and the powers of the Association, as appended to these, minutes, were all severally read and adopted.

10.Took up the subject of correspondence, and agreed to correspond with the sister Associations of this State; also, with the Bethel Association. Appointed brethren N. Morris and M. Crain, delegates to the Union; Abner Erwin and A. B. Sanders to the Pearl River; J. Morris and Isaac Perkins to the Bethel; W. Taylor and J. Taylor to the Buttahatchy. Appointed J. Morris to write to the Leaf River, and A. B. Sanders to the Mississippi Association. Appointed the next Association to be held at Hickory Spring meeting house, in Holmes county.*

1833.

In November, the Association convened at Hickory Spring meeting house—6 churches represented, viz: Yazoo, Mount Gilead, Jerusalem, Tildebogue, Phalti, Holmes co., Bethel, Holmes co.

"Elder Nathan Morris was chosen Moderator, and brother M. Crain, Clerk."

"Correspondence was arranged with the following Associations, viz: Leaf River, Bethel, Pearl River, Union, Mississippi and Buttahatchy.

"On motion,

Resolved, That whereas Lee Compere, an ordained minister, has been excluded from Jerusalem church, for heresy and contempt of the church, in refusing to hear and receive her instructions; also, for administering the Lord's supper to a people not in fellowship with the Regular Baptists, and various other charges. That we highly approve of the course pursued by the church at Jerusalem—and whereas, we are informed, that said

*Here follow the Constitution, Articles of Faith, Gospel Order, and Rules of Decorum, which are similar to those of the Regular or O. S. Baptists generally. It may be well, however, in these days of apostacy from the truth, to give the three following articles of the faith, viz: 4. We believe in the everlasting love of God to His people; in the eternal, unconditional election of a definite number of the human family, to grace and glory. 5. We believe that sinners are justified in the sight of God, only by the imputed righteousness of Jesus Christ; which is unto all, and upon all of them that believe. 6. We believe that all those who were chosen in Christ, before the foundation of the world, are in time effectually called, regenerated, converted and sanctified; and are kept by the power of God, through faith, unto salvation.

Compere has joined a church, once constituted upon our faith and order; but which has since apostatized: Therefore, we caution all regular Baptists to beware of said Compere.

"Preaching on the Lord's day by S. Perkins, N. Morris, G. W. Nolan and J. Morris.

"Resolved, That the Clerk superintend the printing and distribution of 400 copies of these minutes, and that he receive ten dollars for his services."

1834. In November, the Association convened at the Jerusalem Church, in Yazoo county—10 churches represented.

"Elder Nathan Morris chosen Moderator, and J. C. Perkins, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with the following Associations, viz: Union, Pearl River, Mississippi, and Leaf River.

"Brother Norval Robertson addressed the Moderator. He said that he had been appointed a messenger of correspondence from the Mississippi Baptist Evangelizing Society, with a letter; but that he had mislaid the letter, so that he could not find it. Upon which, he was invited to a seat, and his aid solicited. It was also agreed to correspond with said society. Accordingly, appointed brethen Nathan Morris and Joseph Morris, Messengers; and brother Joseph Morris to write the corresponding letter to the said Society.

"The committee, appointed to take under consideration the letter from the Union Association, reported as follows, viz: We, the select committee, have conversed openly and freely with the corresponding brethren from the Union Association, upon the resolves found in their minutes, desiring us to meet them at some subsequent period and place, which we may appoint, for the purpose of opening some way, whereby the brethren sent from our sister, the Bethel Association, can have a fair and open opportunity of coming forward to the joint committee, to make known their grievances, if they have any, or for them, or any of them, to return and make confession of their wrong, and be restored to full fellowship, union and communion, with us and the Union Association.

(11)

  "We, therefore, appoint to meet them on Friday be fore the first Sunday in December next, at Palestine church, Hinds county, Mississippi.

 Delegates—J. Harvey, Abner Belcher, Joseph Morris, Nathaniel Robbins, J. C. Perkins, N. White, James Lee and William Denson.

1835.

In November, the Association convened at Tildebogue church, Madison county, Mississippi. The introductory sermon was preached by Eld. Abner Belcher, from Ga 1:10, "For if I yet please men, I shall not be the servant of Christ." Without transacting any business of particular note, the Association adjourned to meet at Mount Gilead church, in same county, in May next.

Joseph Morris was chosen Moderator, and Daniel Sutherland, Clerk.

"Correspondence was arranged with the following Associations, viz: Pearl River, Union, Leaf River and Mississippi.

"Appointed Elder Joseph Morris to write to Choctaw Association; himself and Elder Abner Belcher, messengers.

"Appointed Elder Nathan Morris to write a letter to the Yallobusha Association, proposing consolidation. Should that object fail, to request a correspondence. Messengers—Elders Nathan Morris, Moses Crawson, Joel Harvey and Joseph Morris.

"A letter from Bethel Association soliciting correspondence, was read and rejected. Elders Nathan Morris, Joseph Morris and brother Silas Mercer were appointed a committee to report a statement of facts, why it was rejected.

"Report.—1. We believe that the Bethel Association was organized in disorder, from the fact that some of the churches belonging to that body—having been dismissed from the Union, for the purpose of organizing a new Association—protested against the Union, and then refused to return to the Union and labor for a reconciliation, although advised to that course by the Yazoo Associational Convention.

"2. We believe it disorder in the Bethel to recognize William B. Harmer, as a Baptist preacher, after a nonfellowship had been declared by the Phalti church, and that non— fellowship had been recognized by the Union and Yazoo Associations.

"3. We believe it a disorder in the Bethel to sustain the official acts of Lee Compere, after having acknowledged at the Palestine Convention in 1834, that Mound Bluff church had done wrong in the reception of said Compere, and he under the sentence of excommunication by Jerusalem church.

"4. We believe it disorder in the Bethel to sustain the churches of their body, in the reception of persons excluded from the churches of our body for immoral conduct.

"5. We believe it disorder in the Bethel to hold a church in their fellowship, constituted in the bounds of another Baptist church—members being received in said newly constituted church, belonging to the old church, without letters of dismission.

"6. We believe that the Bethel is in disorder in recognizing the majority of the Box Creek church, or a part of them, as members of the Baptist order, after they had been rejected by the Union Association for gross immoralities.

"These are some of the reasons why we cannot open associational correspondence with the Bethel; and should our brethren think us extravagant in the above statement, we hold ourselves bound to establish the facts by Gospel testimony, before any regular tribunal of the Baptist order, formed for that purpose.

"The report was read and adopted—9 churches represented.

1836.

In November, the Association convened at Carrollton, Carroll county, Mississippi—10 churches represented.

"Eld. Nathan Morris chosen Moderator, and M. Crain, Clerk.

"Correspondence.—A letter and package of minutes received from the Union by her messenger, brother Allen—a letter and minutes from the Mississippi, Pearl River, Choctaw, and also from the Yallobusha by delegates, viz: Francis Baker, H. McNeal, E. Sullivan and Wm. Kennedy.

"Correspondence arranged with the following Associations, viz: Mississippi, Union, Pearl River, Leaf River, Choctaw and Yallobusha.

"Took into consideration the propriety of consolidating with the Yallobusha Association—whereupon

Resolved, That we recommend the churches of our body, to meet in convention with the churches of the Yallobusha Association, at Rocky Springs, on Friday before the 3d Sunday in May next, and that if a majority of the two Associations agree to consolidate, then this Association to be dissolved.

Churches.—Emmaus, Mt. Gilead, Tildebogue, Phalti, Bethel, Rocky Spring, Doak's Creek, Mt. Carmel, Yazoo and Hebron. Association fund $3; Contribution by the churches, $87—$90; paid for printing these minutes, $40; for superintending the same $15—$55. Balance in treasury, $35.

GRO16 YALLOBUSHA ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XVI

YALLOBUSHA ASSOCIATION

This Association was organized in 1836, but we have not been able to obtain the minutes of that year—therefore we commence with the succeeding.

1837.

In October, the Association convened at Shiloh Church, Yallobusha county—4 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker chosen Moderator, and W. Minter, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from Zion Baptist Association.

"Elds. F. Baker, M. White and Moore preached on Sunday.

"Correspondence returned to Zion Baptist Association.

"On motion,

"Resolved. That we drop, for the present, the correspondence with the Yazoo Baptist Association.

"Resolved, That we renew the correspondence with Choctaw Baptist Association, which was dropped last year in prospect of uniting the Yazoo and this Association in one."

1838.

In October, the Association convened at Lebanon Church, Yallobusha county—10 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker chosen Moderator, and J. G. Hall, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with Zion Association.

"Whereas, it has been represented to this body, that the church at Shiloh has infringed on the terms of her union with this body, by receiving an excluded member into her fellowship—Therefore,

"Resolved, That Brethren Robins, Taylor, Sullivan, Minter, Baker, Hall, Littleton, Whitsett, Freeman and Donham, be appointed a committee to inquire if the church at Shiloh has not departed from Scriptural discipline and Baptist order, by receiving into her fellowship an excluded member, and that they report all the facts to the next Association.

"Resolved. That the churches composing this Assocition be requested to send up contributions for the purpose of bearing the expenses of our delegates to sister Associations."

The circular letter prepared by Brother Francis Baker was reported by the committee appointed to examine it, and then read and ordered to be printed with the minutes.

CIRCULAR ADDRESS.

"Dear Brethren: You have been so often addressed  through the medium of circulars, that we are at a loss for a subject for the present; and we have thought of none more appropriate, under existing circumstances, than that very impressive admonition of the great Apostle of the Gentiles, "Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom." We would not have you to understand by the word of Christ, that the Apostle meant that "Word which was made flesh and dwelt among us," but the revealed word or will of God, the Gospel of his Son.

"It is remarkable that the Scriptures, or word of Christ, have become the text book of the age; and yet we are astonished at the prevailing ignorance with regard to their contents. They are quoted by all classes in Christendom. The statesman, the gentleman at the bar, the politician and the humble peasant, often quote the Bible on various occasions. Yea, the drunkard too, will hold, his cup in his hand, and delay swallowing the intoxicating draught, till he quotes the Bible; and his quotations may as likely be found in the Alcoran as in the Scriptures. And yet, painful to say, he is as apt to make correct and appropriate quotations as many who profess Christ. When we hear misquotations at the bar, or read them in the speeches of gentlemen in the halls of legislation we are not so much astonished; but when we hear egregious errors and misquotations by christians, and especially by preachers, we are disgusted—and think the admonition appropriate, "Let the word of Christ dwell in you." By frequent misquotation of the Scriptures we betray our ignorance of the Bible; an ignorance more inexcusable because our opportunities are good, and the means ample to obtain the blessing of the richness of the word of Christ. One of the blessings we appropriate to ourselves by letting the word of Christ dwell in us, is, that the wisdom it imparts lights up the path of life, and enables us to walk in the light of his countenance. David hath said, "Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light to my path.

"The wisdom that the word of Christ imparts is not only a director in the externals of religion, but it illuminates the understanding, and enables us to discover the hope of our calling, and brightens our evidences in Christ. It also teaches us our own weakness, and learns us to trust in the Lord.

"The wisdom of the word of Christ enables us to discern between truth and error; between the Spirit of Christ and the Spirit of anti— Christ; between the church of the living God and the mystic Babylon. It is this wisdom that teaches and enables us to serve and to worship God acceptably: and to discharge our duties to the Lord and one another—thereby enjoying the answer of a good conscience before God, and that peace of mind "which passeth all understanding." That christian whose mind is richly stored with the wisdom of the word, possesses in a very high degree the advantage of hearing and enjoying the blessing of the gospel, over those who are not in possession, and are ignorant, of the wisdom of the word. With what an amazing difference, and ease, can the servant of God preach to an enlightened and Bible taught congregation, to what he can to a people ignorant and unskilled in the word. The instructed and intelligent hearer hears with diligence, tries by the standard, and receives the truth in the love of it, and rejoices in the saving benefits; while the ignorant and uniformed sits careless and uninterested; nor can the preacher charm or interest them, though he tune and play ever so wisely on every string of the Gospel. How appropriate, then, the admonition, "Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom.

"The great question, then, is, how shall we obtain this rich treasure? 1. By a prayerful search of the Scriptures; for the good Lord hath said, "If any man lack wisdom, let him ask of God who giveth to all men liberally and unbraideth not." Yet it is not to be expected that this wisdom is to be revealed directly from Heaven, aside from the word of God; for then Christ need not to have charged us to "search the Scriptures." And the wise man would have spoken folly when he said, "For the commandment is a lamp, and the law is light."— Pr 6:23. Nor need we expect to obtain the treasure by a search of the Scriptures without the light of the Holy Spirit; but through the light of the Spirit, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world, and which shineth at the same time more perfectly through the whole volume of inspiration, we may hope to obtain this wisdom. The means to be used as stated above, are to search, study, labor, and compare Scripture with Scripture—those parts that treat of the same subject or principles, with each other; and not confound sentences or passages on one subject, with those relating to another— thereby wresting them from their true meaning.

"2. The wisdom contained in the word may be obtained by a studious attention to the light of experience; for christian experience always accords with, and sheds much light on the Scriptures; and the Gospel explains both the Scriptures and christian experience—for the same Spirit that revealed the word of God to 'holy men of old,' also revealed the Son of God in our souls. And our blessed Lord hath promised us that it shall 'abide with us forever,' and 'lead us into all truth,' and bring to our 'rememberance all things whatsoever he hath told us.' Thus the teachings of the Spirit of God in our souls and the teachings of the word of God are the same, It is thus that our souls know that the word of God is true; and it is through the wisdom of the word that we are taught to 'approve the things that are most excellent.'

"Again, we are informed in the Scripture that, 'He that believeth on the Son of God hath the witness in himself.' By a close attention to the testimony of this witness in us, and an application to the Scriptures, we 'Let the word of Christ dwell in us richly with all wisdom, teaching,' &c; and we receive and enjoy all the blessings and consolations of the Gospel, while our souls are made to feast on the heavenly manna, and drink out of those deep wells of salvation. It teaches, also, to look for the coming of our Lord, who shall change our vile bodies into the likeness of the glorious body of the Son of God; and that we shall have a name and a place in the New Jerusalem, the City of the living God—the General Assembly and Church of the First Born—there to see and embrace our crucified, but now glorified and much beloved Lord.

"Beloved brethren! We have presented you with a few things by way of admonition, to stir up your pure minds by way of rememberance; and may the God of peace and love, who brought again our Lord Jesus from the dead, keep and preserve you for his heavenly Kingdom. Amen."

1839.

In October, the Association convened at Loosascoona Church, Yallobusha county—10 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker, chosen Moderator, and J. G. Hall, Clerk.

"Elds. Parks, Meaders, Stovall, and Baker, preached on Sunday, in the order of their names.

"Corresponding letters called for. None were presented.

"Resolved, That for the present we drop all correspondence with sister Associations, owing to the condition of our own body.

"Resolved, That Brethren Baker, Minter and Hall, be appointed to superintend the printing of 300 copies of our minutes; and that they annex to said minutes, the constitution, rules of decorum, and abstract of the faith of this Association.

"Brother Hall reported that he had not found it convenient to prepare a circular letter, according to appointment. He, however, presented and read a selection on that subject, but the Association did not deem it expedient to adopt and publish it as their circular."

REMARKS.—We shall now drop this Association. Hitherto, she has been orthodox in her faith and orderly in her practice. So far as their minutes show, rnissionism has not so much as been mentioned among them. But at this session, the missionary spirit manifested itself furiously. Though the minutes of this session indicate nothing of the kind, yet we learn from letters written at the time, that great excitement and disorder prevailed. An eye witness, who belonged not to the Association, says: "I was also at the Yallobusha Association, and saw more confusion than I ever saw in a religious assembly before; and I thought that the Missionaries tried to take as many advantages of the Old Baptists as Demetrius did of Paul.

Another letter writer, who belonged to another Association, under date of November 17, 1839, says: "I came from thence to the Yallobusha Association, and for me, or any other man to give a correct record of all the proceedings of that assembly would be impossible. I have never in all my life been a witness of such a scene among professors of religion, much less among people calling themselves Baptists. The plain truth is, there were two kinds of people, (to— wit:) Sarah's children and Hagar's; and you, nor I, ever saw the two families together, but what there was mocking and discord and confusion, in lieu of brotherly love and kindness and fellowship.

"I heard one of the well known divines in that Association say, that it would never do for the Baptists to split; for the Lord had given the world to the Baptists, and he could not leave the Baptists. He went on to state that he had been preparing, for some length of time, perhaps six months, to discuss the Missionary question at that Association; and that he was prepared to show, that the anti— Missionaries were nothing more nor less than Roman Catholics, and were actuated by the same spirit.

"Now, brethren, can you not see, without "specs," what sort of love he had for the Old Baptists? Old School Baptists, did you notice those remarks? This is the best compliment you get for all your exertions to keen peace and love with them. As soon as they think they have a majority, the best name you can get from them is Roman Catholics, and are actuated by the same spirit.

"I think it is high time the Old School Baptists were looking at the motto of the Primitive, and obeying the call that says, 'Come out of her my people.' The foregoing with many other harsh speeches were thrown out by the learned gentry of the bar, at that time and place. And finally, the Association left the place in confusion. The old School Baptists repaired to Brother Johnson's about five miles from the place, and entered into an agreement to meet in convention on Friday before the fifth Sabbath in May next, to form a new Association."

The Yallobusha Association was composed of ten churches, five of which withdrew—one united with the Primitive Association, and the others formed the Loosascoona Association.

GRO17 PRIMITIVE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XVII

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

The Convention for the purpose of forming a new Association convened, according to previous arrangement, at Rocky Spring Church, in Holmes county, Mississippi, on Friday before the 4th Sunday in April, 1839.

After preaching by Eld. S. Parks, the Convention was called to order by Eld. N. Morris. Bro. S. Parks chosen Moderator, and Bro. A. Erwin, Clerk. The following churches were represented by delegates, who, being called on, presented their church letters. Names of churches and delegates, viz: Hickory Spring, Holmes county, Eld. Simpson Parks, Joseph Erwin, Granderson Harris,, and Abner Erwin; Yazoo, Holmes county, Eld. Nathan Morris, William Grisom, John Bennett, and Hilliard Fatheree; Rocky Spring, Holmes county, Silas Mercer, Anderson West, H. Blister, and Samuel Cook; Lebanon, Attala county, Eld. J. A. Scott, D. Stephens, Z. B. Gess, and R. Weeks.

The Convention being duly organized, appointed Brethren N. Morris, S. Parks, S. Mercer, and Z. B. Gess, a committee to draft a Constitution, Articles of Faith and Rules of Decorum, and then adjourned till Saturday morning 10 o'clock. Met pursuant to adjournment and unanimously adopted the Constitution, Articles of Faith and Rules of Decorum, presented by the committee— which are as follows:

CONSTITUTION

"1. This Association shall be composed of members chosen by the different churches of our union, who, upon presenting their credentials, shall be entitled to seats— Provided, That this clause shall not be so construed as to admit any member to take a seat, who does not fully believe, and faithfully maintain the Articles of Faith adopted by this Association. The members thus chosen and convened shall be known by the name of the "Primitive Baptist Association.

"2. This Association when convened shall immediately proceed to the choice, by ballot, of a Moderator and Clerk, from amongst the delegates composing the same. The duty of the Moderator shall be to see that the rules are strictly observed; and to take the voice of the Association on all subjects, legally introduced; and to determine on all points of order—nevertheless he shall be subject to the decision of a majority of the Association; provided said decision be called for, on the same day, that the decision was passed. The duty of the Clerk shall be to take a proper and correct minute of the proceedings of the Association.

"3. This Association, when convened, shall have power to judge of the qualifications of its own members.

"4. This Association shall have power to exclude from its body all churches which are not orthodox in their faith—or shall adopt or admit anything in their proceedings, not in accordance with apostolic practice.

"5. This Association shall not have power to interfere with, or Lord it over the internal rights and privileges of the churches—but shall be considered only as an advisory counsel, in all matters relative to their peace and happiness.

"6. The churches of our union shall transmit to each annual session of this body a written communication, specifying the number in fellowship, Baptized, received by letter, Dismissed, Excluded, Restored, and Deceased, since the last session.

"7. Each church composing this body shall be entitled to representation in the following manner, viz: all churches, having fifty members, or under, shall be entitled to three delegates—and one for each additional fifty.

"8. New churches may be admitted into our body, by delegates, bearing petitionary letters, requesting the same. If, upon due examination, they be found orthodox and orderly, the Moderator, by order of the Association, shall manifest their admission by giving the right hand of fellowship.

"9. This Association, when convened, shall be governed by regular and proper rules of decorum, which she shall be authorized to amend at discretion.

"10. The constitution and articles of faith of this Association shall not be subject to any alteration whatever."

ARTICLES OF FAITH

"1. We believe in one God—the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost—and these three are one.

"2. We believe the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, are the word of God, and the only rules of faith and practice.

"3. We believe in the fall of Adam, and the total depravity of the human heart, and man's entire inability to restore himself to the favor of God.

"4. We believe in the everlasting love of God to his people—in the eternal and unconditional election of a definite number of the human family to Grace and Glory.

"5. We believe that sinners are justified in the sight of God, only by the imputed righteousness of Christ, which is unto all, and upon all them that believe.

"6. We believe that those who were chosen in Christ before the foundation of the world, are and will be in time effectually called, regenerated, converted, sanctified, and kept by the power of God, through faith unto salvation, ready to be revealed in the last time.

"7. We believe that there is one Mediator between God and man—the man Christ Jesus—who, by the satisfaction he made to divine justice, by the shedding of his own blood, hath redeemed his elect especially from under the curse of the law.

"8. We believe that good works are fruits of faith and are an evidence of a state of grace.

"9. We believe in the resurrection of the dead, and a general judgment; and that the joys of the righteous, and the punishment of the wicked will be eternal.

"10. We believe Eaptism is immersion, and that believers are the only subjects.

"11. We believe that regularly baptized church members only have a right to commune at the Lord's table.

RULES OF DECORUM

"1. The Association shall be opened by singing and prayer.

"2. But one member shall speak at a time, who shall rise on his feet, and, on obtaining permission, proceed.

"3. The moderator, when addressed by a member, shall signify his right to the floor, by naming the person or otherwise.

"4. No member shall be interrupted while speaking, unless he wander from the subject, or use language of a personal character.

"5. Every motion made and seconded shall come under the consideration of the Association, unless withdrawn by him who made it.

"6. Every case taken up by the Association shall be decided, or withdrawn, before another is offered.

"7. When a question is taken up, after allowing time for debate, the Moderator shall take the vote of the Association, on the subject, in any manner he may think proper, and pronounce the decision forthwith.

"8. Any member wishing to retire, shall obtain permission of the Moderator.

"9. No member shall speak more than twice to the same proposition, without permission of the Moderator— nor more than once till every member, wishing to speak, shall have spoken—nor shall any proposition be made to close the subject, until the debates are through.

"10. The appellation of brother shall be used in the Association, by members in addressing each other.

"11. The names of the members may be called as often as the Association may direct.

"12. No member shall be tolerated in any practice which may tend to interrupt public speaking.

"13. The Moderator shall be entitled to the same privilege of speaking as any other member—Provided, That he appoint another to his seat during the time—but shall not vote on any question, unless the Association be equally divided.

"14. Any member violating these rules shall be admonished by the Moderator at discretion; but only on the day on which the breach shall have been made.

"The Constitution, Articles of Faith, and Rules of Decorum, being read and adopted, the Moderator of the Convention gave the delegates the right hand of fellowship, and declared the Association duly organized.

1839.

In April, the Association convened at Rocky Springs, Holmes county—4 churches represented.

"Eld. N. Morris chosen Moderator, and brother G. Harris, Clerk.

"Resolved, That we offer correspondence with the Tallahatchie Association.

"Preaching on Sunday by elders J. A. Scott, N. Morris, and S. Parks, in the order of their names.

"Resolved, That we appoint brother N. Morris to write a circular letter, to be attached to these minutes, showing the reason why we have formed this Association.

EXTRACTS FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER

"As the above named newly— constituted Association has ordered that her first letter shall show the cause of her constituting in so feeble a state as the minutes will show, we have undertaken the painful, though obedient task. We do not claim the credit of being on the Lord's side because we say we are—neither can we admit that others are because they say so.

"Now to the law and the testimony—and here we would remark, that our objections are to principles, and not men, only on account of principles. We object to the doctrine of General Atonement; and that, too, for no other reason than because it is contrary to the word of God.

"Atonement, theologically, signifies a satisfaction or covering for sin—these being synonimous terms. We will quote a few texts, bearing on this point, viz: "Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered,' Ps 32:1. 'Thou hast forgiven the iniquity of thy people, thou hast covered all their sin,' Ps 85:2. 'Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered,' Ro 4:7. A general atonement would be a general forgiveness; and all who will search the Scriptures, except those who are wilfully ignorant, must see the fallacy of such an idea. And notwithstanding you may nurse it in your bosoms, we boldly affirm, that it will die on your lips, together with all your unscriptural doctrines and practice.

"The case of Uzza is another striking instance of God's curse upon men for disobedience. Has not the Lord said by the mouth of the prophet, 'Who hath required such things of you, have I?' It is certain that everything which God has not commanded, he has forbidden—and those who go beyond the commands of God, are saying by their acts, that God has forgotten to command some things actually necessary in carrying on his work.

"Reflections of this kind are the cause wherefore we protest against Missionary, Tract, Sunday School, and Temperance Societies—not because we are opposed to the spread of the gospel, but because our Lord has not commanded any such thing. About Sunday Schools and Temperance societies, we shall say nothing more than we consider them a part of the trumpery of 'Mystery Babylon the Great.'

"We cannot fellowship your theological schools; and you tauntingly say, that we oppose those schools because we are afraid, that if learned men are brought into the Gospel field, the glory will depart from us; that is, that we shall be less esteemed in the church and in the world. We will say the truth to you, and then you may mock on! God knows we desire that He would send able ministers of the New Testament into His harvest—but we want God to send them and not man. We challenge the learned world to show any divine authority for sending a man to school after God has called him to the ministry; nor is there any need of it— for all power in heaven and on earth is in the hands of God. If He wants a learned Moses, or a Saul of Tarsus, He will have them qualified before he calls them to his work. If he had not intended to hold in his own hand, the right to qualify and send ministers, he would not have told us to pray to Him, as Lord of the harvest, to send more laborers into the field.

"Now, there is no danger but what he will send them —just such as he wants—and that too at the right time. And if they are not completely qualified, He has so ordered it, that as they use their gifts or talents, they will continue to grow therein. Then He holds them in his right hand, waters them every moment, and makes His words theirs. And you will not hear them saying that the heathen are going to hell for the want of preachers, or lack of money. Souls were not redeemed by money, neither will God permit that they shall be made free from the love of sin by it. The Saviour redeemed them by a sore travail—and so the apostles found it, in spreading the glad tidings of salvation.

"There was no Missionary Society for them to run to for money to buy fine horses and fine dressing. But when they were not actually employed in preaching, they were laboring with their own hands, that they might not be chargeable to any—that as they had freely received that they might freely give. Were it possible to see the apostles of our Lord in company with some of our modern Baptists—who call themselves the successors of the Apostles—what a contrast would appear! The one you would see going afoot with a pair of sandals on his feet; the other mounted on a fine steed, with fine boots on his feet—the one with his fisher's coat on; the other the finest broadcloth—the one with rough hands, all exposed by reason of hard labor; the other with fair hands covered with gloves. Now compare their doctrine and you will find as great a contrast. The one saying, silver and gold have I none—and at another time, thy money perish with thee; the other saying three or four thousand dollars more will be of great benefit in advancing the Redeemer's kingdom.

"As the Baptists from whom we have separated have represented us as the cause of the confusion among the churches, we will in all candor propound to them a few questions:

1.    Have we brought in any new thing among the churches?

2.    Have we brought in the General Atonement?

3.    Have we brought in the faith contained in the Encyclopaedia?

4.    Have we brought in the Missionary Societies?

5.    Have we brought in your Theological Schools, together with all such like things?

6.    Do you not know that these things are the cause of all the confusion that is going on all over the United States?

"Surely you must have a great thirst for money, that you should beg it in the name of converting the heathen! —for if you know anything of God, you know this, that it is His perogative to convert the heathen, or as many of them as he wants converted. And He holds the means in his own hands to do it, and as much money at His command as He wants, without your horse— leech system—'crying give, give.'

"We believe that you have among you some of the Primitive Baptists; to them we say, 'COME OUT OF HER MY PEOPLE,' and though like us, you may have some ministers and relatives whom you are loath to leave, remember Lot! What would have been his condition had he continued in Sodom, clinging to his relatives.

"We shall now draw to a close, and only request our readers to give this an impartial perusal, and compare it with the word of God, and not to the traditions of men for if you do the latter, we shall appeal to a higher court—and may the Lord give you understanding in all things."

1839.

In October, the Association convened at Hickory Spring, in Holmes county, 5 churches represented.

"Eld. S. Parks preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. Nathan Morris chosen Moderator, and A. Erwin, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from the Tallahatchie Association.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Pilgrim's Rest and Buttahatchy.

"Three Union meetings were appointed.

1840.

In April, the Association convened at County Line church, Choctaw county.

"Eld. N. Morris chosen Moderator, and Eld. S. Parks, Clerk.

"The Antioch church petitioned for admittance into the Association which was granted.

"Elds. J. P. Taylor, N. Morris and S. Parks, preached on Sunday in the order of their names.

1840.

In October, the Association convened at Lebanon church, Attala county—9 churches represented.

"Eld. S. Parks preached the introductory sermon— text, viz: "When the Most High divided to the nations their inheritance, when he separated the sons of Adam, he set the bounds of the people according to the number of the children of Israel—for the Lord's portion is his people; Jacob is the Lot of his inheritance—De 32:8-9.

"Eld. N. Morris chosen Moderator, and A. Erwin, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from three Associations, viz: The Tallahatchie, by her Messenger, E. A. Meaders; the Pilgrim's Rest, by her messenger, J. Pearsall; the Buttahatchy, by letter.

"Elds. E. N. Langford, J. Pearsall and E. A. Meaders, preached on Sunday in the order of their names.

Query.—"Is it order for churches composing this Association to receive members into their bodies, who have been baptized by the ministry of the Missionary Baptist order, since the time that we declared an unfellowship with them, without baptizing them.

"Answer.—Our opinion in counsel is, that it is disorder."

1841.

In October, the Association convened at County Line church, Choctaw county—14 churches represented.

"Eld. J. A. Scott preached the introductory sermon. "Eld. N. Morris chosen Moderator, and A. Erwin, Clerk.

"Correspondence was received from three Associations, viz: The Buttahatchy, by her Messengers, Wm. Moore and J. Loden; the Tallahatchie, by her messengers, J. Harber and Elisha Moore; the Zion's Rest, by her messengers, W. H. Crawford and G. W. McDonald.

"Elds. F. Baker, S. Parks, W. H. Crawford, and N. Morris, preached in the order of their names on Sunday.

"Correspondence arranged with four Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Pilgrim's Rest, Zion's Rest and Buttahatchie.

1842.

In October, the Association convened at Pilgrim's Rest church, Carroll county—17 churches represented.

"Eld. S. Parks preached the introductory sermon— text, viz: 'And this I say: that the covenant that was confirmed before of God in Christ—the law, which was four hundred and thirty years after, cannot disannul— that it should make the promise of none effect.'—Ga 3:17.

"Eld. N. Morris, chosen Moderator, and A. Erwin, Clerk.

"Correspondence was received from five Associations, viz: The Tallahatchie; the Buttahatchy, by her Messenger brother Moore; the Pilgrim's Rest; the Zion's Rest, by her messengers G. W. McDonald and E. Roberts; the Noxubee, by her messenger T. G. Neal.

"Arranged correspondence with the same.

1843.

In September, the Association convened at Hebron church, Attala county—16 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. N. Morris chosen Moderator, and A. Erwin, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with six Associations, viz: The Noxubee, Tallahatchie, Lusasccona, Buttahatchy, Pilgrim's Rest and Zion's Rest.

"Resolved, That this Association will not in future receive any church into her body, that holds members baptized by the Missionaries since the separation; and, that we advise the churches not to receive the official acts of the missionary ministry."

1844.    

In September, the Association convened at Elam church, Madison county, and in consequence of sickness, adjourned, without transacting any business of importance.

1845.    

In April, the Association convened at Hickory Spring, Holmes county—18 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker, chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberry, Clerk.

"Correspondence was received from Bethany Association by her messenger, Eld. E. Wilbanks.

"Thirty dollars of the Association fund was appropriated to pay traveling expenses of the corresponding messengers to sister Associations."

EXTRACT FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER

"It has been reported by some, and believed by others, that we discard the idea of God's using means or instruments for the accomplishment of his divine purposes. This charge is gratuitous and untrue. Although we do most positively deny the supposed power or efficacy of humanly devised means, to facilitate the salvation of lost sinners, in the manner the doctrine is preached, believed and acted upon at the present day, yet we most freely admit, and firmly believe, that the allwise and glorious God has appointed instruments by which he will accomplish his adorable purposes. This truth is clearly taught in the scriptures; but in the examples we shall give, the reader will do well to mark the difference between the wisdom of God and the policy of men, in providing and bringing means into requisition.

"The first example we shall give of God's using means, is that of the salvation of Noah and his family. The means used on this occasion was an ark; the plan, form and construction of which were all of God. He that was able to dash a thousand worlds to destruction, at a word, and amidst the general calamity, say, 'Let Noah and his family be saved,' chose to pursue a different course. No part of the work was left discretionary with Noah, but all must be done agreeably to the Divine instruction, which Noah received from God.

"The plan of man to save the human race from a devouring deluge, was to build a tower whose top should reach to heaven—but the means which God employed to stop the progress of the work of Babel, was to go down and confound their language.

"The train of means which God employed to elevate Joseph, and to humble his ambitious brethren, was such as human wisdom would have thought most unlikely to success. The jealousy of Joseph's brethren—their envy and hatred—their murderous designs—their avarice and treachery—their selling him into slavery—did not look much like means to bring him into power, and subjugate his brethren.

"The unmerciful Ishmaelites were another link of God's appointed means. By an Allwise decree they were on the spot at the appointed moment—had they delayed their journey a few moments, Joseph had been no more. But when the murderers saw them, Joseph was raised from the pit and conducted down to Egypt; where he withstood the temptation of his mistress; was falsely accused; unjustly condemned; thrown into prison; miraculously brought forth therefrom; and finally raised to the government of Egypt. Good old Jacob did not seem to understand or like the means which God made use of in this case.

"The means which God employed to rid his ancient Israel of a rebellious king, was to send an evil spirit with a commission to go and be a lying spirit in the mouth of all Ahab's prophets. These were commissioned to persuade him to go and fall at Ramath Gilead— and that by lying to him, and saying, that he should go and prosper—and the Lord would deliver Ramath Gilead into his hands.

"When the beloved Son of God was to fulfill all that was written, in law or prophets, or psalms, wicked men and devils were God's sword. In many instances we are told by the evangelists, of what they did, 'That the scriptures might be fulfilled.' When but a babe we see the Holy Child chased down into Egypt by cruel persecution; and being called from thence, he turned into a small city, that the scriptures might be fulfilled. From the manger to the cross, his life is loaded with reproaches, abuses, blasphemies and insults; and all to preserve the sacred volume inviolate. At length against Him both Herod and Pontius Pilate meet, with men of Israel and the Gentiles, 'for to do whatsoever God's hand and counsel before determined should be done.' The heathen raged, and the people imagined vain things against the Lord, and against his Christ; yet all these things were God's chosen instrumentalities for the accomplishment of what his hand and counsel had predestinated. And when the dear, disconsolate disciples, on their way to Emmaus, journeyed and were sad, because of what their Lord had done and suffered from the hands of wicked men and devils, our Lord reproved them, saying 'O fools and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have written, ought not Christ to suffer these things, and then enter into his glory.' Heaven had ordained the accomplishment of these things; and all requisite means for the accomplishment of the end were duly provided.

"But before we close our remarks on this subject, let us examine the means which God has ordinarily employed to facilitate the spread of the gospel ministry—not the making of ministers, nor the regeneration of souls—but the publication of the gospel. As the heavens are high above the earth, so the ways and thoughts of God do truly transcend the ways and thoughts of man. Let us contrast them. For the spread of what they call gospel, men form large, popular, and moneyed societies—establish permanent funds—call into existence unheard of, and unscriptural begging agencies—establish executive Boards, &c: to induce by hire or bribery, such as are greedy of filthy lucre, to enter their field, and labor under their own religious and ecclesiastical dictation.

"How different is the plan of God! The means, if we may call them so, which he employed in the primitive days of his gospel church, were to let loose the powers of wicked men and devils upon his dear servants, to persecute, whip and imprison—calumniate and distress them. He had previously directed them, 'if they make up for you a full purse and splendid outfit in one city, take it and go as their hirelings to another!' Stop! We mistake. Our eye was on another plan. The Divine direction is this: 'If they persecute you in one city, flee unto another.' Such were the means which the Allwise God employed. And when it became necessary to start them out about their Master's work, there arose a great persecution, and the saints were scattered, and they that were scattered abroad went everywhere preaching the word.

"It was persecution, under God, that took Paul to Rome, and John to Patmos—and persecution has been ever since employed by the Holy Ghost in compelling Christ's ministers to traverse the earth with the ministry of the everlasting Gospel. But, mark! while the enraged Jews were made subservient to the cause of God, in wickedly and maliciously persecuting the ministers of Jesus, they themselves had their popular religious proselyting missionaries out in all the land and sea, under good pay and easy circumstances, even as their successors in the pharasaical crusade of modern times.

"Down through the dark ages of pagan, papal and protestant persecution, God has overruled all their rage and malice, and brought it to bear upon his servants in such a manner as to make them the more active in preaching the word of God everywhere. It was persecution in Europe, that brought the pioneers of the Gospel ministry to our beloved shores; and when they thought to sit unmolested and secure under their gourds, and enjoy that social felicity together, for which they had bidden adieu to their native country, and for the enjoyment of which they had crossed the mighty deep, God prepared a worm to gnaw the gourd—it withered—it died. Persecution then arose from the most popular party (Congregationalists.) and they were scattered and went everywhere as God directed their way in providence."

1845.

In September, the Association convened at Antioch church, Yallobusha county—17 churches represented.

"Eld. G. W. McDonald preached the introductory sermon—text, viz: 'And exhort you, that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints.'—Jude 3.

"Elder F. Baker chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberry, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with seven Associations, viz: Buttahatchy, Noxubee, Tallahatchie, Zion's Rest, Bethany, Pilgrim's Rest and Lusascoona.

"Appropriated $36.75 to pay traveling expenses of our messengers to sister Associations.

"Elds. J. Harvey, J. A. Scott, S. Parks and E. Moore, preached on Sunday.

1846. In September, the Association convened at Lewis's Creek church, Carroll county—18 churches represented.

"Eld. S. Parks chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberry, Clerk.

"Elds. S. Parks, J. A. Scott, and G. W. McDonald, preached on Sunday.

"Correspondence arranged with six Associations, viz: The Tallahatchie, Zion's Rest, Bethany, Pilgrim's Rest, Lusascoona and Buttahatchy.

"Resolved, That we highly approve of the course pursued by brother Joel Harvey in relation to the Noxubee Primitive Baptist Association, and that we drop correspondence with her under existing circumstances.

"Query from the Union Church.—"Is it order to receive members baptised by Baptist ministers in the bounds of Associations, where protests, against the antiscriptural societies of the day, have not been entered up —but where there are some contending for, and some against the same.

"Answer.—The Association agreed to give the following advice—that it is the right of each church to judge of the qualifications of her own members.

EXTRACT FROM THE OBITUARY NOTICE, PUBLISHED IN LIEU OF A CIRCULAR LETTER. "Died, at his residence, in Yallobusha county, Miss., on the 26th June, 1846, Elder FRANCIS BAKER, in the 66th year of his age. When the separation of the O. S. Baptists and N. S. Baptists took place, his patience and forbearance were such, that he lingered behind for two or three years, laboring and striving for a restoration of gospel order. But when he found that all his efforts were unavailing, and that the N. S. party were bringing in heresy like a flood, he came out from among them, and declared an unceasing warfare against all their errors— for which he received a full share of that portion of a christian's legacy which consists of persecution. But none of these things moved him—he was prepared by the word of God to expect them.

"He saw that the N. S. party had become unsound in faith and doctrine, and that their works were of a like character—like faith, like works—like always begetting its like—and he ceased not to warn the people against their unscriptural doctrine and practice. This he did from a high sense of ministerial duty, notwithstanding he knew that those who could not endure sound doctrine would be offended neverthe less he shunned not to declare the whole counsel of God—knowing that it was impossible to preach sovereign, discriminating grace without givinng offence. Witness the effects of Jesus' remarks relative to the widow of Serepta and Naaman the Syrian. It seems that they heard him patiently, perhaps willing to call his doctrine conservative, until he come out openly and preached discriminating grace, and then the ire of their father was kindled within them, and they were filled with wrath and sought to destroy him. The servant is not greater than his master—and brother Baker knew, that if they thus persecuted the Master, they would also persecute the servant—and hence he marvelled not as if some strange thing had happened to him."

1847.

In September, the Association convened at Rocky Spring church, Holmes county—20 churches represented.

"Eld. J. Harvey preached the introductory sermon— text, viz: 'Except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it.'

"Eld. S. Parks chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberry, Clerk.

"Eld. S. Parks, S. C. Johnson, E. A. Meaders and G. W. McDonald, preached on Sunday.

"By request of Mt. Paran church,

Resolved. That we appoint Elds. N. Morris, J. A. Scott, S. Parks and G. W. McDonald, together with brethren B. Griffin and S. Canterberry, a committee to visit said church, on Thursday before the 3rd Sunday in April, 1848, to examine into the order of said church, and report at our next meeting.

Query presented by Brother A. West, viz:—"Will the Association sustain the churches in their resolutions against Free Masonry and Odd Fellowship?" After some debate the following was offered, by Brother B. Griffin, as a substitute, viz: "Should a church hold in fellowship a member, who shall hereafter be in the habit of attending the Lodges of the Free Masons or Odd Fellows, to the detriment of the peace and harmony of the church?

Answer.—"We advise their absence from the Lodges."

EXTRACTS FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER

"By good works we are not to understand any thing that the vain imagination of man may consider such— for many will come unto Christ 'in that day' and boast of the 'wonderful works' they had done in the name of Jesus but notwithstanding their impudent and hypocritical expostulations, he will declare he never knew them. This may not be wondered at,, when it is considered, that the name of Christ has the ascendancy in the civilized world; and Christianity, a popular theme. And thousands use his name merely to take away their 'reproach' leaning and relying on their own efforts, as the cause of their salvation.

"Hence all the institutions of men, invented for evangelizing the world, are called auxiliaries, to aid Jesus in saving his people from their sins. The characters here brought to view are not Jews, Mahomedans, nor heathens, for these refuse to do anything in the name of Jesus, and much less 'wonderful works.' It is clear to all unprejudiced minds, that they are professed christians—and that not a few but 'many.' And from the very form of their expostulation 'in that day' it is evident, they expected a seat in Christ's Kingdom in consideration of what they had done.

"Without faith it is impossible to please God; and those only who have the faith in God's elect—which is the gift of God, and works by love, and purifies the heart—can perform good works acceptable in the sight of God. And though His people are zealous of good works, they view them as the fruits of faith, but not the cause. And though good works are strenuously insisted on, by the inspired writers—and without them faith is dead—yet they are nothing more than the sweet smelling fruit, that adorn the branches of the true vine.

"Hence the special care taken by the inspired writers, to distinguish between works and grace. "It is not of him that willeth nor of him that runneth." But on the contrary. 'To him that work not but believeth on him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness.' Many say, that if they believe this doctrine, they would take their fill of sin. This, in its proper sense, is true of every christian; for foolish thoughts are sufficient to fill him; and acts added thereto often make him overflow. But taken in the sense in which it is usually spoken, there is not better evidence to prove, that those persons are still in the gall of bitterness and bonds of iniquity.

"They do not understand, that christians follow the bent of their will after conversion in the performance of good works; and act contrary to their will when they do otherwise. 'To will is present with them, but how to perform that which is good they find not.' There is none good but God; and nothing good but what emanates from God; and even a christian never did, nor never can, do a good work, though it may externally appear so, otherwise than by the aid and influence of the Spirit. Hence, we learn that christians 'without Christ can do nothing.' 'But the Spirit helpeth our infirmities; for we know not what we should pray for as we ought; but the Spirit maketh intercession for us with groanings that cannot be uttered.' Therefore, if the branches be alive and receive sap from the true vine, they will bloom in some degree with good works."

1848.

In September, the Association convened at Zebulon Church, Leake county—20 churches represented.

"Eld. S. Parks chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberrv, Clerk.

"Correspondence was arranged with six Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Zion's Rest, Bethany, Pilgrim's Rest, Loosascoona, Buttahatchy.

"On motion, took up the request of Union church, relative to publishing the statement of facts which caused the exclusion of Eld. N. Morris from said church; and after some discussion, it was unanimously agreed that we will comply with the request of said church.

"Whereas, Eld. Nathan Morris has been excluded from the fellowship of Union church, Yazoo county, Mi.; and whereas, he has disregarded the action of the church, and still continues to preach; and whereas, a false impression has been made upon the public mind relative to the cause of his exclusion. Therefore,

Resolved, That the statement of facts relative to his exclusion be published with the minutes of this Association, according to the request of Union church:

"A statement of Facts which caused the exclusion of Eld. Nathan Morris from the fellowship of Union church, Yazoo county, Mississippi.

"1. He admitted in open conference, as he had usually done, that, previous to his marriage to the mother of Reuben Bull, a marriage contract was entered into, in which he agreed, that if he was the longest liver, all her property should, at his death, belong and go to the said Reuben Bull.

"2. He stated in open conference, as he had usually done, that, in his opinion, said contract was not legally binding; but he considered himself morally and conscientiously bound by said contract, and intended to comply with it to the fullest extent.

"3. Subsequent to the death of the mother of Reuben Bull, a misunderstanding arose between him and Eld. N. Morris relative to said property—the former claiming immediate possession of said property, according to his understanding of the contract, and the latter claiming a life estate in said property.

"4. Through the influence of mutual friends, Reuben Bull agreed that, for the sake of peace and harmony, he would submit to the claims of Eld. N. Morris, if he would give him a lawful title to the property to take effect at the death of said Morris so as to enable him to get peaceable possession without any difficulty with his heirs.

"5. The friends of Eld. N. Morris advised him to do so, time after time, for a long period; insisting that it was his duty to live peaceably with all men, so far as in his power lies—that as he professed to believe the contract not legally binding, hence, the greater necessity for giving a title to the property, in order to fulfill and carry out what he openly confessed to be a moral and conscientious obligation.

"6. Notwithstanding it was a general opinion among the Primitive Baptists of this Association wherever the facts were known, that Eld. N. Morris ought to give a title to said property, which was well known to him; and, notwithstanding his brethren had labored with him for a long period of time, entreating him in the kindest manner to give a title for the property at his death, and thereby make an amicable adjustment of the matter, and wipe out a reproach to the Primitive Baptist cause, yet, after all, he utterly refused and offered no other excuse than at a certain time, while offended with Reuben Bull, he said that he would not give a title.

"7. Eld. N. Morris charged Eld. G. W. McDonald with backbiting him relative to said property.

"8. The church at her conference in June, 1848, after having made all preliminary preparations, and having help from three sister churches, took up both cases; and after investigation, Eld. N. Morris refusing to move from his former position relative to the property; and refusing, when called on by the conference, to give any testimony to sustain his charge against Eld. G. W. McDonald; it was unanimously decided that the church cannot approve his course relative to said property; and that in the absence of testimony, his charge against Eld. McDonald cannot be sustained.

"9. The above decision of the church was read to Eld. N. Morris in open conference, and he called on for a reply; whereupon, he stated emphatically in substance, that until he was satisfied of his wrong, he would not give an inch for all the Primitive Baptists in the State; and as to the charge against Eld. McDonald, he offered no satisfaction whatever.

"10. The church then formally excluded him from her fellowship, and agreeably to his request, have written out this statement of facts, all of which is respectfully submitted."

1849.

In September, the Association convened at Mt. Pisgah Church, Carroll county—19 churches represented.

"Eld. G. W. McDonald chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberry, Clerk.

"Received and read a communication from Rocky Spring Church, charging Pilgrim's Rest Church with visiting the Lodges of the Free Masons to the detriment of the peace and harmony of the churches, and with a departure from gospel order. Said communication stated that she hsd taken steps to restore peace and harmony, but had failed to obtain satisfaction."

On motion, the case was taken up, and after some debate was laid over until Monday.

When, on motion, it was again called up—whereupon, the following preamble and resolution was unanimously adopted:

"Whereas, The Pilgrim's Rest Church was given good cause of offence to the Rocky Springs and several other churches; and whereas, due steps have been taken by Rocky Spring Church to reconcile the existing difficulties; and whereas, satisfaction has not been obtained. Therefore,

"Resolved, That Pilgrim's Rest Church be excluded from this Association."

"Correspondence arranged with six Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Zion's Rest, Bethany, Pilgrim's Rest, Loosascoona, and Buttahatchy.

EXTRACT FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER

"As Free Masonry is marring the peace of some of the churches composing this Association, we have selected it for a subject on which to address you. And in entering upon the subject we will here remark, that an attempt has been made either to slander the Association, or prejudice the minds of the community against us, by saying, that this is a new test of fellowship, gotten up by the Primitive Baptist Association. But this we know to be untrue; for in searching Benedict's, Burkitt's and Semple's histories of the Baptists, we find it has been a fruitful source of debate for past ages, in various parts of the United States. And owing to the troubles which the Baptists have had on this subject, there is considerable prejudice in the minds of the Masons against them; for it has often been and is now said, that the Primitive Baptists are opposed to Masonry and Odd Fellowship. But this in the main is unfounded; for we are not opposed to either of these Fraternities, farther than to keep them out of our churches. This we have ever done; this we are now doing all over the United States; and this we will no doubt continue to do."

1850.

In September, the Association convened at Union Church, Yazoo county—16 churches represented.

"Eld. J. A. Scott preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. G. W. McDonald chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberry, Clerk.

"Resolved, That in place of a circular for our next Association, we publish a history of the rise and progress of the Primitive Baptists in this State, and Brethren Joseph Erwin and B. Griffin be appointed a committee to write said history, and that they are at liberty to select three brethren to assist them."

Correspondence arranged with six Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Zion's Rest, Bethany, Loosascoona, Pilgrim's Rest and Buttahatchy.

"The committee to visit Salem Church reports as follows: That they visited said church, and labored to restore order and fellowship, but were unable to do so. The church, through said committee, asked the Association for advice, relative to their present condition. The Association agreed to give the following advice: That, if they wished to dissolve, it would be proper and right to call a presbytery to assist in their dissolution.

"Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Association that good order would require in all cases a presbytery to be called to assist the dissolution of any church.

"Resolved, unanimously, that this Association will not hold in fellowship any churbh that tolerates her members in visiting the Lodges of Free Masons, Odd Fellows, or Sons of Temperance, to the detriment of the peace and harmony of the churches."

1851.

In September the Association convened at Coila Church, Carroll county—17 churches represented —20 in all.

"Eld. S. Parks chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberry, Clerk.

"Elds. G. W. McDonald, S. Parks, and E. A. Meaders, preached on Sunday.

"Called for the report of the committee appointed at the last session of this Association, to write a history of the rise and progress of the Primitive Eaptists in the State of Mississippi. They report that they had made some progress, but had not been able to complete the work for want of time; and asked that further time be allowed them. The report was received, and the committee requested to report to the next session of this Association."

"Correspondence arranged with six Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Zion's Rest, Bethany, Loosascoona, Pilgrim's Rest, and Buttahatchy.

1852.

In September, the Association convened at Lebanon Church, Attala county—16 churches represented.

"Eld. Thos. G. Neal preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. S. Parks chosen Moderator, and S. Canterberry, Clerk.

(13)

"Elds. Crecelius, Parks, and Roberts, preached on Sunday.

"On motion,

"Resolved. That we take pleasure in recommending the History of the Primitive Baptist of the State of Mississippi, now in the course of publication by Brother Benjamin Griffin, to the favorable consideration of all our brethren and friends in this and adjoining States.

"Resolved, That the prospectus of said History be published with these minutes in lieu of a circular letter."

"Correspondence arranged with six Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Bethany, Loosascoona, Pilgrim's Rest, Buttahatchy, and Zion's Rest.

 

GRO18 LUSASCOONA REGULAR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XVIII

LUSASCOONA REGULAR BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

1840.

In May, delegates from four churches met in convention, at Mt. Carmel, Yallobusha county, for the purpose of forming an Association. Eld. J. Robbins was chosen Moderator, and J. Barton, Clerk. Having gone through with the ordinary preliminary arrangements, the Association duly organized, and the right hand of fellowship exchanged by the delegates, the convention adjourned sine die.

1840.

In September, the Association convened at Hopewell church Pontotoc county—5 churches represented.

"Eld. J. Robbins chosen Moderator, and J. Barton, Clerk.

EXTRACT FROM THE CIRCULAR

"3. We believe in the doctrine of election by Grace —'who hath saved us, and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to His own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began.' 'Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you and ordained you.' 'According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love.' 'Having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ unto himself according to the good pleasure of his will.'—'to the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.' 'Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the spirit, unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ.'

"5. We believe that sinners are justified in the sight of God, only by the imputed righteousness of Christ. 'Even as Abraham believed God and it was accounted to him for righteousness.' 'So then they which be of faith are blessed with faithful Abraham.' ' But to him that worketh not, but believeth in him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted— for righteousness.' 'For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.' 'He shall see the travail of his soul and shall be satisfied, by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many, for he shall bear their iniquities.' 'That being justified by his grace, we should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life."

"6. We believe that God's elect will be called and regenerated by the Holy Spirit. 'Knowing brethren beloved your election of God.' 'For our Gospel came not unto you in word only, but also in power and in the Holy Ghost.' 'Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the Spirit unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood Jesus Christ.'

'Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called, and whom he called them he also justified, and whom he justified, them he also glorified.' 'For the children being not yet born, neither having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God, according to election might stand, not of works but of him that calleth.

1843.

In September, the Association convened at Fellowship church, Yallobusha county—7 churches represented.

"Eld. O Guthrey chosen Moderator, and J. Barton, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Primitive and Noxubee.

"Elds. Guthrey, Moore and Meaders preached on Sunday.

1844.

In October, the Association convened at Zion Hill church, Pontotoc county—9 churches represented.

"Eld. S. Parks preached the introductory sermon, by request, he being a corresponding Messenger.

"Eld. E. Moore, chosen Moderator, and J. Barton, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Primitive and Noxubee.

"Query.—What is a legal and valid Baptism?"

"Answer.—We believe that Baptism administered by a legal and regular ordained preacher of the gospel— baptizing by immersion a proper candidate, after hearing a declaration of his faith in Christ—to be a legal and valid baptism.

"Resolved, That we publish Johnson Guttery in our minutes. Said Guttery was a licensed preacher and was excluded from the Hopewell church, Pontotoc county, Mississippi, a member of this body. Said Guttery was excluded for disobeying the mandates of the church, and for wilful, known lying. Said Guttery has since that time removed to Walker county, Ala., and has, so we are informed, attached himself to a church of the Primitive Baptist order, and is exercising in public as a preacher of the Gospel. We would therefore warn our brethren of the Primitive order against such an impostor.

"Elds. Shelton, Moore. Parks and Meaders, preached on Sunday, in the order of their names.

1845.

In October, the Association convened at Bethel church, Pontotoc county—10 churches represented.

"Eld. J. Pearsall chosen Moderator, and J. Barton, Clerk.

"Correspondence received from four Associations, viz: New Hope, Noxubee, Primitive and Tallahatchie.

"Correspondence arranged with the same, and also with the Buttahatchy Association.

1846.

In October, the Association convened at Laodicea church, Pontotoc county—14 churches represented.

"Eld. R. R. Shelton chosen Moderator, and J. Barton, Clerk.

"Elds. H. W. Harwell, E. Moore, and R. R. Shelton, preached on Sunday in the order of their names.

"Correspondence dropped with the Noxubee Association, and arranged with five others, viz: The Tallahatchie, Primitive, New Hope, Battachatchy and Regular Baptist Associations.

1847.

In October, the Association convened at Shiloh church, Yallobusha county—13 churches represented.

"Eld. J. Pearsall preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. J. Pearsall chosen Moderator, and J. Barton, Clerk.

"Elds. J. Pearsall, S. Parks and E. A. Meaders, preached on Sunday in the order of their names.

"Correspondence arranged with four Associations, viz: Tallahatchie, Primitive, Buttahatchy and Tombigbee, (Ala.)

1850.

In October, the Association convened at the Fellowship church, Yallobusha county—14 churches represented.

"Eld. J. Pearsall preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. J. Pearsall chosen Moderator, and Wm. Milton Clerk.

"Elds. S. Parks, J. Pearsall and E. A. Meaders, preached on Sunday.

"Correspondence arranged with four Associations, viz: The Tallahatchie, Primitive, Buttahatchy and Tombigbee.

 

GRO19 TALLAHATCHIE ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XIX

TALLAHATCHIE ASSOCIATION

This Association was organized in 1837, on a Constitution and Articles of Faith, similar to the Primitive Baptists in general—and hence we deem a repetition unnecessary. Having failed to obtain a full file of minutes, we commence with the 3rd number.

1839.

In October, the Association convened at New Hope church, Marshall county—9 churches represented.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. W. West chosen Moderator, and S. M. Caruthers, Clerk.

"Elds. West, Parks and Patrick, preached on Sunday, in the order of their names.

"Correspondence arranged with two Associations, viz: Primitive and Mississippi river, (Tenn.)

"Sardis Church requests the Association to alter the Constitution, so that giving or not giving shall be no bar to fellowship.

"Answer.—Giving or receiving never has been considered a bar to fellowship; but becoming members of the falsely termed benevolent institutions of the day, has been, and is now considered a bar to fellowship.

"Therefore resolved. That we declare an unfellowship with all who may join the Bible, Tract, Temperance or Missionary Society, or Sunday School Union.

"Whereupon the three delegates from Sarflis church withdrew from this Association.

1840.

In October, the Association convened at Pleasant Grove church, Lafayette county — 8 churches represented.

"Eld. W. West preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and A. M. Crawford, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with two Associations, viz: Primitive and Mississippi River (Tenn.)

"Elds. Smart, Mason and Meaders preached on Sunday, in the order of their names.

1841.

In October, the Association convened at Byhalia church, Marshall county—12 churches represented.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and A. M. Crawford, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with two Associations, viz: Primitive and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

"A petitionary letter was presented from the Regular Baptist Association, which was read; and, finding that the correspondence between her and the Mississippi River Association had ceased—on motion, agreed not to open correspondence with the former, until the correspondence be renewed between her and the latter; also, agreed to write the former Association a friendly letter, requesting her to labor for correspondence with the Mississippi River Association.

1842.

In September, the Association convened at New Hope church, Marshall county—14 churches represented.

"Eld. T. Grace preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and T. R. Young, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Primitive, Lusascoona and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

1843.

In September, the Association convened at Mt. Zion, Desoto county—16 churches represented.

"Eld. W. Smart preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. W. West chosen Moderator, and T. K. Young, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Primitive, Lusascoona and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

"Query—From the church at Shiloh, Marshall county, asking the advice of the Association, relative to the churches of this Association receiving members from the churches belonging to the Regular Baptist Association, upon the credit of their letters of dismission?

"Answer.—This Association believes that their reception according to the doctrine of the Gospel, and the general usage of the Baptists, is right and in good order.

"Query—From the church at Providence, asking if it is good order for a minister of the Baptist church to baptize persons out of the church, without their knowledge or approbation?

"Answer.—It is not good order, and should not be countenanced by the churches.

"On motion by brother Morton, this Association is requested to advise the churches respecting the reception of members from other Baptist churches not in our Union.

' "Whereupon, the Association advises the churches not to receive members from the Missionary or Arminian churches or societies, only by experience and baptism—except such only as have been regularly initiated previous to the separation.

1844.

In October, the Association convened at Antioch church, Lafayette county—15 churches represented.

"Eld. A. Crawford preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and T. K. Young, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: "Primitive, Lusascoona and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

Elds. Moore, Culp, Guthrey and Parks, preached on Sunday in the order of their names.

1845.

In October, the Association convened at Cold Water, Marshall county—17 churches represented.

"Eld. F. Baker preached the introductory sermon in consequence of the ill— health of the appointee.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and T. K. Young, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Primitive, Lusascoona and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

"Elds. Culp, Parks, Baker and Meaders preached on Sunday, in the order of their names.

1846.

In October, the Association convened at Shiloh church, Marshall county—17 churches represented.

"Eld. H. W. Harewell preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. W. West chosen Moderator, and T. K. Young, Clerk.

'Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Primitive, Lusascoona, and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

"On motion, this Association agrees to petition the Regular Baptist Association for a correspondence.

"Elds. Moran, Culp and Hearn, preached on Sunday.

"Query from Pleasant Grove Church.—Is it right for a man claiming to hold and believe the faith of the Old School Baptists, having license to exercise in public, and a letter of dismission, and refuses to give up said letter, and mingling with other denominations?

"Answer.—We think according to scripture it is disorder, and the churches should be careful not to countenance such characters.

1847.

In October, the Association convened at Pleasant Grove church, Panola county—16 churches represented.

"Eld. A. M. Crawford preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and T. K. Young, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Primitive, Lusascoona and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

"Elds. Pearsall, Parks and Petty, preached on Sunday.

"Request from the Shiloh church, asking the Association to take some action upon the case of A. Compton:

"Therefore, whereas in the course of the discipline of the Gospel in the church at Shiloh, she has been reduced to the necessity of excluding from her fellowship Aaron Compton, an ordained minister of the Gospel; and whereas, they have subsequently, through a committee, demanded of him his credentials which he has refused to deliver.

"Resolved, (by the Association,) That he be published in these minutes.

1848.

In October, the Association convened  at Pleasant Hill church, Tippah county,—churches represented.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and T. K. Young, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Primitive, Lusascoona, and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

"Elders Jenkins, Petty and Meaders, preached on Sunday.

1849.

In October, the Association convened at Union church, Desoto county—16 churches represented.

"Eld. W. West preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and T. K. Young, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Primitive, Lusascoona and Mississippi River, (Tenn.)

Elds. R. Petty, of Ky., P. Culp, of Tenn., and E. A. Meaders, preached in the order of their names.

"Request from the Horn Lake church, asking the Association to notice the case of J. R. Renfro:

"Therefore, whereas J. R. Renfro, who was an ordained minister, has been excluded from fellowship, and has been called upon to surrender his credentials, which he refuses to do.

"Resolved, (by this Association,) That we are not accountable for his acts as a minister."

1850.

In October, the Association convened at Pilgrim's Rest Church, Lafayette county—15 churches represented.

"Eld. S. Parks preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. E. A. Meaders chosen Moderator, and E. D. Sinclair, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: Primitive, Lusascoona and Mississippi River (Tenn.)

"Elds. Moran, Pearsall and Parks, preached on Sunday in the order of their names.

1851.

In October, the Association convened at Hepzibah church, Tippah county—15 churches represented.

"Eld. H. W. Harewell preached the introductory sermon.

"Eld. E. A. Headers chosen Moderator, and E. D. Sinclair, Clerk.

"Correspondence arranged with the three above named Associations.

"Elders Verell, Culp and Meaders preached on Sunday in the order of their names.

GRO20 NOXUBEE PRIMITIVE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XX

NOXUBEE PRIMITIVE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

1841.

In October, Delegates from eight churches met at Bethesda Church, Oktibbeha county, for the purpose of organizing an Association. The introductory sermon was preached by Eld. G. Woodruff, from Exodus xxv: 40.—'And look that thou make them after their pattern showed thee in the Mount.' After which, the Delegates from the several churches assembled together in convention, and chose Eld. B. Holbrook, Moderator; and Brother A. C. Habert, Clerk. The letters from the several churches were read and the names of the Delegates enrolled. An invitation being given by the Moderator to ministering brethren of our faith and order, Elders Cook and Gunn took seats in the Convention. Having appointed a committee to draft a Constitution, Abstract of Faith, and Rules of Decorum, the convention adjourned till to— morrow morning. Met pursuant to adjournment: and unanimously adopted the Constitution, Abstract of Faith, and Rules of Decorum, prepared and presented by the committee—then adjourned sine die.

The convention having adjourned, the Association immediately formed, consisting of the Delegates of the convention, who were authorized by their respective churches to meet in Association.

Eld. B. Holbrook chosen Moderator and E. Pace, Clerk.

Correspondence arranged with four Associations, viz: Pilgrim's Rest, Buttahatchy, Zion's Rest and Primitive.

PREAMBLE AND DECLARATION OF THE NOXUBEE PRIMITIVE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION Whereas, a division is taking place among the Baptist denomination in almost every part of the world, which has caused much distress, and in a good degree prostrated the life of Godliness amongst us; and whereas, (according to our view,) through the ingenuity and cunning craftiness of the New School party, they have so managed as to attach all the blame to the Old School; and thereby have called down upon us, in some degree, the censures of many who are not acquainted with the true cause which has led to the separation. We feel it to be our duty, and esteem it a high privilege, to set forth the true cause which has produced the effect—which is now exhibited to public view.

We will first mention a few things which they allege against us, and then reply to each allegation in order. It is said that we are opposed to the spread of the gospel. It is also said that we are opposed to men's contributing their money, in any way they may think proper, and thus abridging the constitutional rights of men. And it is further said that we are opposed to the support of the ministry.

To the first allegation, we answer, that we are not guilty; and God forbid that we ever should oppose the spread of the gospel—yet, we are ready to acknowledge, that we are opposed to the method pursued by them in spreading it— for the following reasons:

We believe that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are the word of God, and the only unerring rule of Faith and Practice; and in them we find neither command, precept, nor example, for the formation of any religious society except the gospel church—and as such we are constrained to view all the Societies, from the State Conventions down to the Temperance Societies, nothing but the invention of men; and we learn from the Scriptures that the people in days of old, 'provoked the Lord to anger with their inventions—and the plague broke in upon them.' Thus were they defiled with their own works, and went a whoring with their own inventions."

We are informed that all Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine—for reproof —for correction—for instruction in righteousness—that the man of God may be thoroughly furnished unto all good works. Hence, we believe Jesus Christ is King in Zion, and has the sole right to give laws for the government of His Church; and that it is at our peril to add to, alter, or attempt to amend them in the slightest degree. Finding the whole system which the advocates thereof are pleased to call benevolent enterprise, unprecedented in the word of Truth, we, with the fear of God before our eyes, are compelled to dissent therefrom.

Again, we view it was not only a departure from the word and spirit of the Gospel, but also, of the most evil tendency—it is tending to a law religion, which we all know his ever proved pernicious to the peace and wellbeing of the church; and also, destructive of the civil and religious liberties of those countries where it predominates—and now rapidly tending to endanger those of our own happy Republic.

As regards our being opposed to every man's using his money as he pleases—we answer, every man has a legal right to use his money as he may think proper, if it be to lay it out for ardent spirits, upon which he drinks himself to death, and brings his family into distress and degradation. We acknowledge that he has a legal right to lend his money to another, for the known purpose of gambling and dissipating. And we know also that he would be at the same time encouraging and facilitating one of the greatest moral evils that ever pervaded human society. We now ask the question, who can blame us for trying to enlighten the mind of an individual thus injuring himself, and the circle in which he moves—to impress upon him his moral obligation, in abstaining from the abuse of his legal privileges.

But it may be said by some, that it is unreasonable and ungenerous to compare the benevolent institutions of the present day, with those sinks of iniquity; to which we reply, that could we view those institutions in the light in which they are represented by their advocates, we would acknowledge our wrong, take shame to ourselves, and desist. But it will be seen by referring to our previous remarks, that we have taken quite a different view of the subject, believing they are fast tending to a law religion, and leading to a union (or what is still worse, if possible a collusion,) between church and State. The propagation of the Christian Faith was not only unaided, but directly opposed in most instances by the civil government in the different countries in which it spread. The publishers of the gospel were in general plain and unlearned men, destitute of all worldly influence and power. Their doctrine was in itself obnoxious, and their appearance little calculated to procure a favorable hearing; nor could they present to the view of men any other inducement to embrace their testimony than the prospect of life and immortality in the world to come— with the certainty, that through much tribulation believers must enter the Kingdom of God. The success of their doctrine stood in direct opposition to the power of Princes, the wisdom of Philosophers, the intrigue of Courts, with all the weight of an established system of idolatry and superstition. The general character of the disciples of Christ is that of a suffering people; and, notwithstanding some intervals of repose, the progress of the Gospel is, in general, traced in the blood of the Saints. And their successfully fighting a good fight and keeping the faith, against the most formidable opposition—not by banding together and fighting with carnal weapons, but by earnestly contending for the faith once delivered to the Saints, and submitting to all the wrongs legally heaped upon them—is a clear manifestation that the power is of God, and not of man.

While the christian cause was thus opposed by the world, and made its way by its own divine energy, the general purity of its profession was preserved; for what, then, could induce men to embrace it, but a conviction of its heavenly origin and importance. So long as the christian religion was thus circumstanced, its success carried with it its own witness. But the scene is altogether changed, when we view the state of matters after the ascension of Constantine—for then, instead of the teachers of Christianity being called upon to show their attachment to it, by self— denial and suffering for its sake, we see them exalted to worldly honor and dignity; and the holy and heavenly religion of Jesus, converted into a system of pride, domination, and hypocrisy; becoming at length the means of gratifying the vilest lusts and passions of the human heart.

From the day's of Constantine, the corruption of the christian profession proceeded with rapid progress; many evils existed before this period, which prepared the way for the events that were to follow. But when the influence of the secular power became an engine of the clergy, to be exercised in their kingdoms, it should not be a matter of surprise, that the progress became rapid in converting the religion of anti— Christ into a system of spiritual tyranny, idolatry, superstition and hypocrisy, until it arrived at its full height in the Roman hierarchy; when, what was called the church became the sink of iniquity.

As to being opposed to the support of the ministry, we answer: That we are utterly opposed to the salary system. We contend that he who stipulates to render so much service for so much money, is an hireling, let what may be said to the contrary. And the language of our Saviour is the hireling fleeth because he is a hireling, and careth not for the sheep. Nevertheless, we believe, that they who preach the gospel should live of the gospel; for even so hath the Lord ordained. We believe, therefore, that is the duty of the minister to preach the gospel, and it is also the duty of the church to supply his necessities.

After saying what we have in reply to the foregoing allegations, we now proceed to show the true cause of our not only dissenting, but finally separating. It will be remembered that the Primitive Baptists have ever stood upon and contended for the predestinarian doctrine. Since the introduction of the mission system, we find in our opponents a great inclination to depart from the doctrine of the Gospel. It is true that some of them say they believe the doctrine of grace. But for the greater part of them are openly inclining to Arminianism, and preach Arminian doctrine. And where there are different doctrines propagated in the same society, it ever will produce division in sentiment; and hence comes confusion, envyings, evil surmising, &c.

We are taught in the word of eternal truth that God is not the author of confusion. And it is also enjoined on us in the same word "to mark them that cause divisions and offences contrary to the doctrine which we have learned, and avoid them." Before the modern mission system found its way in among us, we were in peace and harmony. Since its introduction, we have been in continual confusion. We, moreover, contend that the system was originated in Arminianism, and to act consistent, they are obliged to preach a doctrine equivalent to it. And as an evidence that there is a departure from the faith, we find that the Old School, who still preach the doctrine of grace, and earnestly contend for the faith once delivered to the Saints, are traduced, condemned and called Antinonians by the New School party. Many other hard things are said of us, all of which we have to suffer because we trust in the living God. For the sake of many precious brethren and sisters who were led off by these Arminian teachers, we have borne it, and continued with it much longer than we should have done. Therefore, for the sake of our peace, and the force of the divine injunction, we are compelled to enter our protest against all such inventions, and to withdraw as a body from all who do, or may advocate them, or give countenance to their proceedings.

We offer the following Scripture as the cause of our course: "Be not unequally yoked together with unbelievers, for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? and hath concord hath Christ with Balial? or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? and what agreement hath the Temple of God with Idols? for ye are the Temple of the living God; as God hath said, I will dwell in them and walk in them; and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing, and I will receive you; and will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty."—2Co 6:14,18. "And I heard a voice from Heaven saying, come out of her my people, that ye be not partakers of her sins, and that ye receive not of her plagues."—Re 18:4.

1842.

In September, the Association convened at Mount Nebo Church, Noxubee county—13 churches represented.

Eld. B. Holbrook chosen Moderator, and E. Pace, Clerk.

Correspondence arranged with four Associations, viz: Zion's Rest, Buttahatchy, Pilgrim's Rest, and Primitive.

1843.

In September, the Association convened at Church Hill Church, Lowndes county—12 churches represented.

Eld. E. Pace preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. B. Holbrook chosen Moderator, and E. Pace, Clerk.

Elds. A. M. Reynolds, G. W. McDonald and J. Harvey, preached on Sunday, in the order of their names.

Correspondence received from four Associations, viz: Primitive, Buttahatchy, Zion's Rest, and Loosascoona.

Correspondence arranged with the same four, and also with the Pilgrim's Rest Association.

1846.

About this time this Association fell into disorder, as we learn from the minutes of Old School Baptist Associations, which declined her correspondence.

GRO21 BETHANY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION CHAPTER XXI

BETHANY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

1844.

In August, Delegates from seven churches met, pursuant to previous arrangement, at New Bethel Church, Leake county, for the purpose of organizing an Association. Eld. E. Wilbanks was called to the chair as Moderator, and J. G. Crecelius to act as Clerk. The letters from the several churches having been read, and the names of the Delegates enrolled, the Convention proceeded to appoint committees, and then adjourned till Monday. The Convention met pursuant to adjournment, and, the Constitution and Articles of Faith having been read and adopted, the Moderator declared the Association duly organized. A hymn of praise was sung, and the right hand of fellowship extended to the Delegates.

The Association then convened and chose the same Moderator and Clerk.

Correspondence arranged with two Associations, viz: the Primitive Baptist and Noxubee.

"Resolved, That our reasons for withdrawing from the Mt. Pisgah Association be read, which was done. And on further motion, the same was adopted."

REASONS AND APPEAL

"When, in view of passing events, conscience points out the necessity of breaking asunder the bonds of union which have hitherto bound together those who profess to be of the same sentiments, and to be governed by the same laws, and rules, it becomes those who dissent or separate themselves from others, to set forth their reasons for such separation.

"Therefore, we, who have hitherto been members of the Mt. Pisgah Baptist Association, hereby make known our reasons for separating ourselves from those brethren who still choose to remain in that body.

"1. Because they hold and publish to the world that there is now more gospel Ministers than there is money to send out. (See Minutes of the Baptist State Convention of May 4, 1838, page 7.)

"2. Because they hold and publish to the world that embarrassments in pecuniary matters have obstructed some of the holiest enterprises for the advancement of Messiah's Kingdom. (See Third Annual Report of American and Foreign Bible Society.)

"3. Because they are in the practice of buying and selling life membership in Societies under the pretension of spreading the Gospel, thereby placing the Gospel side by side with common merchandise, and placing the poor brother on an unequal footing with the rich hypocrite. (See Constitution of the American Baptist Home Mission Society, article 3.)

"4. Because they employ men at high stipulated wages to go out, preach, and act as agents in collecting money and laying the claims of education before the churches. (See minutes of the Baptist State Convention, 1843, appendix A, page 8.)

"5. Because they hold and publish to the world that large sums of money can be spent with prudence, economy and profit, in advancing Christ's Kingdom, if such sums, can be obtained; and if such sums cannot be obtained, such profitable efforts cannot be effected—thereby laying such stress upon money, as to make the advancement of the Redeemer's Kingdom entirely dependent on the amount of money that can be raised, thereby placing the salvation of God's Church on human efforts and contingency, which is in direct violation of God's system of salvation as revealed in his written and infallible word, which he has given for the rule of our faith and practice. (See Tenth Annual Report of the Baptist Home Missionary Society, page 18, April 1842.)

"These are some of the reasons that impel us to the course which we are now pursuing. We do not wish to be understood as saying, that all the brethren, from whom we have separated, are in the direct and immediate practice of all the unscriptural and newly invented schemes against which we here complain, or that all of them directly favor or sustain all the mammon— like schemes of the present day Societies, which were never participated in by the Baptists until within our recollection. But we hold such brethren to be in disorder, for countenancing and continuing in fellowship with those who are practicing and endeavoring to carry out such worldly and unscriptural measures as we have herein set forth. We are unwilling to give up the long cherished doctrine and sentiments upon which the Baptists have relied ever since the Lord Jesus Christ established his church on earth. Finally, brethren, addressing ourselves to you who profess to be particular Baptists of the old school, but, who are suffering such things to be preached and practiced amongst you, as are learned from men, and not from the word of God; it is for you to say—not us —whether we can longer walk in union with you. We regret, and so must you, to see brethren professing the same faith, severing themselves from each other—but, brethren, if you compel us either to sanction the traditions and inventions of men as religious obligations, or to separate ourselves from you, the sin lieth at your own door. Thus, brethren, our appeal is to you—you may treat it with contempt, if you can despise the cause for which we contend in conformity with the word of God."

1845.

In October, the Association convened at Antioch Church, Scott county—9 churches represented.

Eld. S. Berry preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. E. Wilbanks chosen Moderator, and J. G. Crecelius, Clerk.

Correspondence received from Zion's Rest and Primitive Baptist Associations.

Correspondence arranged with the same two, and the Noxubee Baptist Association.

Elds. W. H. Crawford, G. W. McDonald, N. Morris, and Eli McDonald, preached on Sunday, in the order of their names.

EXTRACT FROM THE CIRCULAR LETTER

"A wonderful and horrible thing is committed in the land; the Prophets prophesy falsely, and the Priests bear rule by their means; and my people love to have it so; and what will ye do in the end thereof?—Jer 5:30-31. The usual length of a circular forbids our entering largely upon this text. The Prophet, in the preceding part of this chapter, very plainly exhibits the inconsistency of the Jews, and God's anger against them. In Jer 5:21they are called foolish people, and without understanding; though they are said to have eyes and see not, ears and hear not. A horrible thing, indeed, that professors of Christianity should entertain and exercise towards each other a spirit of hatred, envy and malice; and that men professing to be preachers, instead of being determined to know nothing in their ministerial labors, save Christ and him crucified, have turned aside into vain quarreling, stirring up strife and contention, not unfrequently making their sermons introductory to whatever Society they wish to bring to the notice of their auditory., and in which they themselves feel the most interested. The members yielding their assent to such wonderful and horrible things as are committed in the land, are sometimes led into hateful and envious opposition to each other; and suffer themselves to be ruled and Priest— ridden by those Judaizing teachers—and wonderful indeed that many seem to love to have it so. It is a fact worthy of remark, that the members of many churches generally imbibe the spirit of their pastor or supply, and we are not alone in believing, that if the spirit that dwelt in Christ had also dwelt in them, those works of the flesh would never have been manifested to such a shameful and sinful degree as has been the case amongst the Baptists of this country. If half the zeal and energy which have been exerted in favor of the missionary cause, had been to fulfill the scripture duty in administering to the poor, that 'horrible thing' would not have been committed in the land— the preachers would not have preached falsely, and the deacons would not have ruled by their means, and the people would not have loved to have it so; but 'what will ye do in the end thereof.' Read Mt 25:31-46."

1846.

In October, the Association convened at Primitive Church, Neshoba county—8 churches represented.

Eld. R. R. Fortson preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. E. Wilbanks chosen Moderator, and J. G. Crecelius, Clerk.

Elds. W. H. Crawford, R. R. Fortson, G. W. McDonald, and E. Y. Terrell preached on Sunday.

Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: The Primitive, Predestinarian and Zion's Rest.

1848.

In October, the Association convened at New Chapel Church, Scott county—9 churches represented.

Eld. S. Hansbrough preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. E. Wilbanks chosen Moderator, and J. G. Crecelius, Clerk.

Elds. J. A. Scott, M. Hopson and W. Roberts preached on Sunday.

Arranged correspondence with three Associations, viz: The Primitive, Predestinarian and Zion's Rest.

1849.

In October, the Association convened at Lebanon Church, Scott county—8 churches represented.

Eld. E. Wilbanks chosen Moderator, and J. G. Crecelius, Clerk.

Query from New Chapel Church.— "Is is good order for a church to grant a member a letter of dismission who lives in the immediate settlement of the church, and is not going to move, and no other church of the same faith and order within convenient distance of such applicant?"

Answer.—"We believe it to be good order for a church to grant letters in all cases to members in full fellowship —the church to exercise a sound discretion agreeable to the Gospel."

Correspondence arranged with three Associations, viz: The Primitive, Predestinarian and Zion's Rest.

1850.

In October, the Association convened at the Primitive Church, Newton county—10 churches represented.

Eld. W. Roberts preached the introductory sermon.

Eld. E. Wilbanks chosen Moderator, and J. G. Crecelius, Clerk.

Query.—"What shall this Association do with a church that permits her members to join and frequent Free Mason Lodges?"

Answer.—"Withdraw from such a church as a disorderly member."

"Whereas, it is represented and established to the satisfaction of this Association, that Edinburgh church is in disorder by retaining in her fellowship a member who has attached himself to the Free Masons. Therefore,

"Resolved, That this Association recommend to four churches of her union, viz: Lebanon, New Bethel. Primitive and Antioch, that they appoint three delegates each, to meet with Edinburgh Church, on Saturday before the fifth Sunday in December next, to labor with said church and effect a reconciliation if possible." 

REMARKS

We have now disposed of all the minutes in our possession, except a few scattering minutes of Buttahatchy and Zion's Rest. From a minute of the former in 1846, we learn that five churches of her union were located in Mississippi and the balance in Alabama. And from a minute of Zion's Rest Association in 1847, we learn that eight churches were in the former State and the balance in the latter.

Besides the foregoing there are three other Old School Baptist Associations which are wholly or in part in this State, viz: Pilgrim's Rest, on the eastern border; Predestinarian, in the South— east, and New Hope, in the North— east.

The Zion, Choctaw. Mt. Pisgah, and perhaps some other Associations, were organized on Old School Baptist principles. But as they are now 'joined to their idols' and harmoniously building with the New School Baptists, we shall 'let them alone.' However highly we may esteem some of their members individually, we are constrained to renounce their system of religion as unauthorized by the Scriptures—insiduously tending to evil and not too good. This conclusion may seem like presumption to those whose opinions are formed from specious appearances. But we can only decide by a strict comparison with the divine Rule, aided by our measure of faith and experience. And according to these, we not only reject their effort system, but deplore the course of some in its support, from whom we had good grounds to hope for better things.

GRO22 BENEDICT'S HISTORY CHAPTER XXII

BENEDICT'S HISTORY

If the late History of the Baptist Denomination, by David Benedict, is no more reliable generally than that portion which treats of the Primitive Baptist Association in Mississippi, it is unworthy of the name. He says: "The Yazoo and Primitive communities occupied the same ground, as the latter came up after the other went down." This is correct in order of time. With what propriety, then, could he say, "These two little companies are both on the Yazoo river," when he had previously stated that one went down before the other came up? He then goes on to say, "The ministers who were connected with them were Nathan Morris, Joseph Morris, and Wm. L. Morris." and refers to a letter from the latter, in 1844 as his authority.

Now, in the first place, there were several other "ministers connected" with the Primitive Baptist Association, viz: Simpson Parks, J. A. Scott, D. W. Stephens, E. N. Langford, Joel Harvey and Francis Baker. And secondly, Joseph Morris never was connected with it. And thirdly, Wm. L. Morris was not, in 1844, a member of any Baptist church, and if he ever has been since, it is unknown to us. Our personal acquaintance with him has been fifteen or twenty years, and we never have known him charged with willful misrepresentation. And therefore, it would be too great a stretch of courtesy towards the great Baptist historian to suppose, that Wm. L. Morris ever represented himself as a minister of any denomination, to Mr. Benedict or any other man. Those who will examine his scattering and incoherent remarks, on pages 772, 777 and 778, relative to the Primitive Baptist Association, will readily see, that his mind was under a slight hallucination, or his heart a little tainted with malice.

Under the head of "Old School, Primitive or AntiMission Baptists, on page 935, Mr. Benedict says, "If I have been less full in my description of their affairs, it is on account of the backwardness of the people, and because their history could not be obtained." A few years back, while he was getting up this history, he wrote a kind of circular letter to D. E. Jewett, which was published in the Christian Doctrinal Advocate, New York, in which he stated, "I have said in my papers, and now say again, that if your people will supply me with the arguments and reasons for their opposing course, I will publish them without note or comment, verbatim et literatim, to the word and letter." Now, if this pledge has been fulfilled any where in his history, which numbers 970 pages, we are unable to find it. And lest the reader might conclude, that the "reasons" perhaps were not furnished, we will quote from page 746, under the head of Western Association, No. 2, viz: "The first minutes give, in full detail, their reasons for withdrawing," &c. The substance of them are, that the old body "had become connected with a variety of institutions not known in the scriptures, which cause a general confusion in the churches by attempting to unite them with the world in the spread of the Gospel. Come out from among them, be ye separate, touch not," &c, is the language of exhortation which the seceding party addresses to their brethren." Again, on page 749, under the head of "Uharley Association," which, Mr. Benedict says, "was an off— shoot from the one last named, in 1839; the few churches of which it was formed, came out with the stale string of resolutions," &c. There were also many letters addressed to him, through the Doctrinal Advocate, by Old School Baptists, giving the "reasons" for their "opposing course," none of which have been published "verbatim et literatim, to the word and letter."

These things are not noticed by way of complaint, but to show that he was not qualified in heart to act justly towards the Primitive Baptists. Many more quotations might be made to establish this fact. The following quotation, bearing on this point, is from the Signs of the Times, an Old School Baptist periodical, viz:

"But of the brevity of the notices taken of us we would not complain; as he is a religionist of a different and altogether dissimilar order from that of ourselves, we had no claim on him to notice us at all; but of the unfairness, misrepresentations, and falsehoods of the caricature he has given, we have a right to complain, and to repel the slander. If Mr. Benedict had been ignorant of the real character of the Old School Baptists, why did he essay to give their history until he should become acquainted with them, so as to know whereof he affirmed? The "Signs of the Times" have been regularly mailed to him, from the first number of the eleventh volume to the present date; we have also forwarded to him, by his special request, the minutes of many Old School Baptist Associations every year, besides other documents, including the Address of the Old School Baptists assembled at Black Rock, Md., about 17 years ago; and he has also received all the Old School periodicals published in United States. Can it be possible that with every means of information before his eyes, he has been so stupidly ignorant, or so blindly prejudiced, that he has failed to learn our real character? If so, he is not to be relied on as an authentic historian in any other respect."

On page 935, under the head of "Old School Primitive, or Anti— Mission Baptists," Mr. Benedict says:

"These people generally claim the first two of these appellations as descriptive of their peculiar views, in opposition to those of the friends of benevolent efforts; the last is applied to them by their opponents. Most of them disown the name; while D. Parker and a few others freely admit it as the proper cognomen of their party."

The reader will readily perceive, in the foregoing, a sly, insinuating attempt to identify the Old School Baptists with D. Parker and his two— seedism. If illiberality and the absence of christian candor were the worst features of such a course, it would be more creditable to him as a historian. He knew that the Old School Baptists had repudiated that ism as another New School system of even more modern date among the Baptists than Fullerism.

On the same page Mr. Benedict goes on to say:

"It is one thing to complain of the modus operandi in the collection of funds, and the management of missionary affairs at home and abroad, and another to take a dead stand against what is properly denominated the efforts system."

If the modus operandi of the effort system was restricted to a Gospel mode, and a Gospel object—such as "to communicate to him that teacheth," "distributing to the necessity of saints," "remembering the poor," &c, there would be no dead stand against it by the Old School Baptists.

The "modus operandi" of sending the Gospel to the heathen, as they call it, seem to be of very little consequence with Mr. Benedict and his missionary friends. But when they meet their opponents on baptism, why, then, the "modus operandi" is of the utmost importance.

The Old School Baptists are strict constructionists in everything else, as well as baptism, for which there is precept or example, requiring the discharge of christian duty. They believe that the mode or manner of doing, is as important in religious matters as the thing to be done—the propriety of which is clearly proven by the typical dispensation. It was for presumption in this respect, relative to the ark, that Uzza was smitten dead by an offended God. He believed that the ark of God was in danger of falling, and put forth his hand to sustain it. Mr. Fuller, and his associates believing that the church of God was in danger of falling, matured a missionary plan or mode of sustaining it. And let those who believe in external signs, as evidence of a peculiar blessing, read Mr. Fuller's biography and see whether or not his punishment was less than that of Uzza.

Presumptuous impudence is universally considered more offensive than indolent negligence. And when we carefully look over Scripture precepts and examples, relative to christian duty, in connection with Scripture warning, the conclusion is rivetted on our minds, that the same principle holds good with the Divine being. The one is an omission of duty through the weakness of the flesh, but the other cannot be attained by the flesh, in religious matters, without the aid of an evil spirit.

Let those who are in favor of the Effort System, regardless of the "modus operandi," read the following quotations, spoken by our Savior:

"Wo unto you, Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye compass sea and land to make one proselyte; and when he is made, ye make him two— fold more the child of hell than yourselves."

Again:

"Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works? And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you; depart from me, ye that work iniquity."

Once more:

"For there shall arise false Christs, and false prophets, and shall show great signs and wonders; insomuch that, if it were possible, they shall deceive the very elect."

Now turn to Mt 25, and see what kind of duties he appreciates at the final winding up of all things:

"For I was an hungered, and ye gave me meat; I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink; I was a stranger and ye took me in; naked and ye clothed me; I was sick and ye visited me; I was in prison, and ye came unto me; verily I say unto you, inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me."

Let it be remembered that those who administer to one of his brethren, yea, to one of the least, are administering to the King of Saints. Nothing said about the heathen whom he shall break with a rod of iron and dash in pieces like a potter's vessel. But all his concern seems to be about his brethren. And He has also said:

"But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a mill— stone was hanged about his neck and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea." "Vengeance is mine; I will repay saith the Lord."

One other view of this subject should not be omitted; and that is the marked difference between the two classes, relative to works performed. One were so full of the Effort System, that they boast of the many "wonderful works" that they had done in the name of the Lord. But the other, having never viewed what they had done as in any wise meritorious in their eternal salvation, but only as a discharge of duty in connection with their temporal salvation and welfare in time, they had never treasured it up in their minds—for they had been so rooted and grounded and fixed in the doctrine of free grace alone, that they had lost sight of the genuine good works which they had performed.

DOCTRINE

For the sake of brevity we have selected nine extracts, and bundled them together, for the purpose of showing the position of the New School Baptists. In a history of 970 pages, Mr. Benedict has studiously avoided an exposure of the true position of his party. He sneeringly denies the right of the Old School Baptists to that appellation—pretending that they, instead of his party, have left the Old Regular Baptist faith and practice. The following extracts, bearing on this point, though few and far between, in his history, which the reader will observe by reference to the pages. In the relative position in which he has placed them, they may be read without arresting the attention of the general reader. But when they are brought together and read in one collection, it is impossible for any person, of a sound mind, not to see that the Missionary party have denied the faith, ever held to by the Old Regular Baptists:

1st. "But doctrinal matters have been at the bottom of all the troubles, and predestination has been the bone of contention. The anti— mission party, as near as I can learn, without any exception, are high or hyper— Calvinists, and are so tenacious of the old theory of particular atonement," &c. Page 935.

2nd. "Is salvation made possible for every individual of the human race? One whole day was spent in debating this subject, and most of the preachers took part in the debate. Those who supported the affirmative were called Arminians, the other side were denominated Calvinists. Had these brethren been acquainted with the distinctions made by Fuller and others, of a general provision and particular application, it would have relieved them from embarrassment and altercation. The reader must bear in mind that in this day (1775) those were called Arminians who held to the universal provision of the Gospel, or that the atonement of Christ was general in its nature. Page 651.

3rd. "Similar agitations and altercations were experienced in all parts of the country, when the orthodox portion of our denomination adopted Mr. Fuller's exposition of the Atonement in preference to the old particular and limited plan. Page 794.

4th. "Such a rule would have robbed us of a Fuller, at whose feet so many educated theologians of Britain and America have delighted to sit. Page 939.

5th. "Our old ministers in this region, half a century since, would have denounced as unsound in the faith, the great mass of our community of the present day, both in Europe and America, Fuller and Hall among the rest. Page 580.

6th. "But a new state of things has arrived; most of these old self— denying ministers have ceased from their labors; a new set of men are coming on the stage, without the secular means and talents of their predecessors, but generally with more acquired abilities; and, moreover, with a fixed determination that they will devote all their time and powers to the work of the ministry in all its various departments; and the churches must make up their minds on this subject, and make their election of one of two things, viz: Either to give their pastors a competent support, or remain in a pastorless condition. Page 941.

7th. "So cautious were the Kentucky brethren, and so much afraid of a consolidation of power, that they were slow at first to come into the measure. The late Dr. Nole, the moderator of the first meeting, was one of the principal movers of this undertaking; when I was in the State in 1829 he informed me that his brethren stood off—were afraid, &c. I (David Benedict, the great Baptist historian,) encouraged him to make a beginning, if they got no more together than the English Baptists did in their first missionary meeting in Kettering. Page 832.

8th. "Besides these there are a few others, which are much reduced in number, or are crippled in their operations, by infusion of priciples adverse to the benevolent and evangelical enterprises of this active age. Page 595.

9th. "This is the way to do the thing in our growing cities and towns; and if our people had been half awake to enterprises of this kind, half a century ago, what augmentations might have been made to our community." Page 458.

These extracts are deemed amply sufficient to expose the deceitfulness and insincerity of the New School Baptists, in pretending to occupy the position of the Old Regular Baptists. In 1775, says Mr. Benedict, "those were called Arminians who held that the atonement of Christ was general." Yes, and they were called Arminians now, just as they were then.

But in process of time, says Mr. Benedict, "the orthodox portion of our denomination adopted Mr. Fuller's exposition of the atonement in preference to the old particular and limited plan." This they had a republican right to do. But, having repudiated the old plan, and adopted a new one, why do they deny the fact? Having "adopted Mr. Fuller's exposition of the atonement in preference to the old particular and limited plan," they should, as honest men, acknowledge it before the church and the world.

As to their delighting to sit at the feet of an Englishman in preference to a Nazarene, they are of age and must answer for themselves. All that we have a right to demand is, that, having adopted their new plan in preference to the old one, they should not hide the fact from public view. Mr. Benedict has truly said that doctrinal matters have been at the bottom of all our troubles. And these have led to practices equally as objectionable.

"Our old ministers in this region half a century since, would have denounced as unsound in the faith the great mass of our community of the present day, Fuller among the rest."

And now, because we do the same thing, they become fretful, and call us all sorts of ugly names.

On page 935, Mr. Benedict says:

"If I have been less full in my descriptions of their affairs, it is on account of the backwardness of the people, and because their history could not be obtained."

For the purpose of exposing the hypocrisy of such a statement, in addition to what has already been shown, we now propose giving extracts from various letters written to Mr. Benedict on the subject. First, however, let us give an extract from the very next page of his history, from which the above bare— faced statement was taken, viz: "A large amount of their documents are before me, which contain the resolutions and decrees of their churches and associations." We now proceed to give extracts:

EXTRACT FROM MR. BENEDICT'S CIRCULAR OF PROMISE.

"I have said in my papers and now say again, that if your people (O. S. B.) will supply me with the arguments and reasons for their opposing course, I will publish them without note or comment, verbatim et litteratim, to the word and letter."

Instead of doing as he promised to do, he has merely alluded to them—and that too, usually in a sneering manner. And yet, after all, towards the conclusion of his history, he attempts to embrace them as brethren, and calls it a "family matter." But we wish Mr. Benedict to understand, that we repudiate all such insinuations—our mothers are no more alike than Sarah and Hagar, and our fathers are still less alike.

LETTERS TO BENEDICT. CHRISTOPHER SERCH, OF PENN., TO ELDER BENEDICT

"I understand that there is a work in progress under your hand, styled "A History of the Baptists," in which it is your intention to give an account of all sorts of Baptists, &c.*******

"As to giving you our reasons and arguments against such societies, I am afraid, that it would be like casting pearls into the sea. Christ said to Nicodemus "except a man be born again he cannot see (or understand) the kingdom of God." So if you have been "born again," we can safely leave God to reason and argue the case with you; whereas, if you have not been "born again," we cannot make you understand the kingdom of God, if we should reason with you till doomsday.

"However, Ed. B., we will give you the reasons why we cannot fellowship your societies; and wherein we find your societies interfering with our Gospel privileges; and we shall, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, contend against them.

You say the Baptists were always a missionary people; as to this we may not disagree. But as to their always having been a mercenary people, I contend, that they have not; nor did they become a mercenary people, so long as they regarded the Law and the Testimony, above the inventions of man. Though to deny that they are nowmercenary, would be to deny what actual begging of money from the poor, is carried on, for the support of your institutions.

That the Lord Jesus commanded his disciples to "Go into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature," is not denied. But that the Lord ever commanded his people to form societies out of the church for the spread of the Gospel, is denied. And, that he ever instructed any to raise money by begging, to send a perverted Gospel into all the world or rather to pay men for preaching a perverted Gospel, is denied; though such, when they cannot get what money they want, cry, that the Lord's cause is suffering for lack of money. Hark! 'The earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof; and who shall supply the Lord in that He lacketh.'

That the formation of such societies, for the advancement of the cause of Christ and the building up of the church of God, is not of Gospel order, wants no proof. To these societies no one becomes a member, but such as contribute of their substance, or are made members by others; consequently building up the churches upon 'wood, hay and stubble.' Yes; and what then? Why, they who have been taught by blessed experience, that the gift of God cannot be purchased with money, are stigmatized as being opposed to the spread of the Gospel. But hark! Christ's kingdom is not of this world, else would his servants fight with the weapons of this world."

ELDER J. M. WATSON, OF TENNESSEE, TO ELDER D. BENEDICT

"The Gospel was preached on the Lord's plan throughout the whole world, after the commission was given; but it was so done, under His special care and providence; and if his plan do not carry it throughout all the world now, it is because his power and mercy are not put forth to the same extent; and not for the want of human power, human benevolence, and human institutions, as modern missionaries would have us to believe. None dare deny that the Gospel under its greatest general dispensation, was withheld, at particular times, from particular countries.

The Gospel has not degenerated into the power of man, but is yet the power of God, and its going forth is according to Divine , and not human power. Nor have its spiritual blessings degenerated into human benevolence; therefore it still blesses 'with all spiritual blessings,' according as the subjects were chosen in Christ before the world began, and not according to general benevolence. The blessings of the Gospel are communicated after having been 'made sure to all the seed,' the elect, or chosen seed; not according as man's power, wisdom, or benevolence may devise, but according to the course of God's grace and mercy on earth.

We are told that if we wait for the operation of God's grace in this affair, the world will not be evangelized. Then, I suppose, we are not to wait in faith, praying unto the Lord to send forth more laborers, and for putting forth His power and mercy according to the Divine plan, but must devise plans of our own, and carry them out by human power, put forth through human institutions, on the principle of general, human benevolence, at the cost of those millions of means, which the Scriptures know nothing of.

Thus we see that the missionary course now pursued, is calculated to lessen our confidence in the Divine plan, to oppose the operation of faith, in the providence of God, and to beget idolatry of heart, in relation to the institutions, and millions of money, which have been brought into requisition, to subserve the world's plan. The ' Golden Calf of missionism has been fully set up, and much idolatrious worship has been offered up to it.

Besides all the foregoing, the modern missionary spirit is decidedly Arminian, in its course and tendencies--is disposed to compromise with all errors--is the bond of union for all religious shams and devices. It

matters not to this spirit, whether it goes forth through a Methodist, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, Pseudo— Baptist or Roman Catholic, in evangelizing the world. All unite in their means of human power, gold and silver, put forth through human institutions. Their machinery may differ somewhat, but it is to be feared, that the same spirit works them all. Moreover, this spirit has so little fellowship for the Lord's way, so little regard for worlddispleasing truths, that it seems to be on much better terms with world, than with the unpopular truths of the Bible, which it shows far more good will to pervert, than to defend. Another characteristic of this spirit is, that in its efforts to evangelize the world, it looks more to the world for help, than to heaven.

It is very strange to look back and see how much opposition and how little help Primitive ministers derived from the world, and how much is now offered and given, professedly, for such service! Surely it cannot be the same Gospel, but is 'another Gospel/ that the world has fellowship for, in like manner as have all its ministers.

Take particular and unconditional election, predestination and effectual calling, with many other things which most modern missionaries are won't to take, from the Gospel, and connect all its blessings with time contingencies, free will, free agency, and moral power, and the world will find no fault therewith; neither will Satan oppose a Gospel of this kind, but on the contrary will espouse its cause, transform himself into an angel of light, and raise up missionaries in all denominations to propagate it, and bring all this world's availables to help it on."

ELDER JAMES KING, OF TENNESSEE TO ELDER BENEDICT

"You say 'it is contended that the Baptists have always been a missionary people.' I ask you for the proof, that the Baptists ever were a missionary people, in the modern acceptation of the term, until the 18th century, when, according to your own showing, missionism sprang up among the English Baptists. See your account of the formation of the society at Kittering, in your former History of the Baptists, vol. 1. page 233. It is true, in the same volume, page 43, you say, 'the Apostles and Primitive preachers were almost all Missionaries.' And then describe them thus: 'At the call of God, they "went forth without regard to parish lines or ecclesiastical districts—asked not for license—waited not appointments—sought no emoluments—but dependant on the treasury of heaven they journeyed, aided by the common succor and miraculous influence of the Holy Spirit, they went everywhere preaching the word.

Really, Mr. Benedict, an Old School Baptist could have no manner of objection to such missionaries as you here describe. Please, careful reader, to compare this account of Primitive Missionism, with modern missionary doings, and it will not require a Solomon to discover the contrast. Do those in the employ of New School Missionary Boards have no regard to fields of labor, appointed them by their masters? Do they seek no emoluments? Do they journey, dependant on the treasury of heaven? What means that continual din about money—to obtain which the selling memberships in missionary and other societies, has been invented? Indeed, Mr. B., modern missionary doings are not found in the Bible—and are sought in vain, except in the history of modern times.

But, Elder B. calls for objections. Well, one objection I hear continually urged, is 'it is not in the Bible'— but, like infant baptism, is wholly dependant on inference, for its support. Is it not strange, passing strange — —if so much depends on modern missionism, as its advocates would have us believe—that the thing is no where mentioned in the Bible, the divine directory for christians?

It was said of God's ancient national people, that they should dwell alone, and not be reckoned with the nations; and one crying sin of Israel, was their continual hankering after the manners and customs of their neighbors. On one occasion they asked for a king, that they might be like other nations. And if Rome has not led the vain in modern missionary doings, you have missed the mark—for you tell us, that in the year of our Lord, 1622, Pope Gregory, the 15th, formed an institution, for the propagation of the faith, and that by it a great number of missionaries were sent forth.

Elder Benedict, you can behold a great deal of Roman Catholic superstition and error in infant Baptism; but nothing objectionable in modern missionism, which is evidently another offspring of the old scarlet Lady. O, consistency! thou art a jewel! If, as you assert, the Apostles and primitive preachers were missionaries, in the modern acceptation of the term, will you, or some of your numerous friends, please tell us who was President of that Board; who were vice-Presidents; who were corresponding and recording Secretaries; and who were constituted life-members by paying $30?

"Elder B., your long— standing as a member of all the Boards, has in all probability made you quite an adept in vindicating their doings; and by this time no doubt you can bring forward all their mighty array of human reasoning and human expedients for evangelizing the world. To preach the Gospel is quite another matter— to know Christ and him crucified, was the extent of Paul's determination—and Old School Baptists feel disposed to say, to modern missionaries, go thou and do likewise.

Elder Benedict, you deal largely in the hacknied epithets 'anti, non— effort, omission Baptists,' &c, as though the O.S. Baptist ministry suffered no privations, underwent no hardships, or in fact preached not at all— as though they studied not to show themselves approved unto God. Ah, there lies the rub—they study not to show themselves approved unto men—but, in the fear of God, they preach a Gospel, which is not after men; they neither received it of men, neither were they taught it, but by the revelation of Jesus Christ. And as to all humanly invented schemes and projects, they are wholly indifferent whether they were invented by Catholics or Protestants; they assign them all over en masse, as the inventions of Anti-Christ.

ELDER MARTIN SALMON, N. Y., TO ELDER D. BENEDICT

Should a full history be given of that people, who claim the name of Baptists, embracing 30 years past, I am of the opinion, Sir, that the digressions, substitutions, experiments, expedients, and new measures, would be truly sickening to the honest soul. I thus judge, Sir, from quite a correct knowledge of the conduct and loose course of the entire popular, or New School Baptists of the State of New York. While many of the professed churches seem to hold with iron grasp their former creeds in one hand, with the other they are grasping Sabellianism, and every other ism that caused to err. Ah, truly, Ichabod is inscribed on the once fair tablet of that people, who in the main were once walking in the love of the truth.

Is it not manifest to you, Sir, that the people of the land called Baptists, have taken to themselves strange wives—and that the princes and priests are 'foremost' in this unlawful trespass? Have they not adopted worldly policy, while professedly laboring to build up a kingdom which is not of this world? Are not the people with whom you stand in fellowship, wedded to filthy lucre as a helper—an efficient, helper to promote the cause of God? For proof, suffer me to cite you to a circular, sent out by the ministerial conference of the State of New York. One clause must satisfy every honest man, viz: 'The gold and silver are the Lord's, and the cattle upon a thousand hills are his. And he now calls for it, that he may expend it for the salvation of a perishing world, as he did his own heart's blood."

Now, sir, I aver, fearless of successful contradiction, that all religious compacts, whose reliance is money, to carry forward the kingdom of grace, is anti— christian— The conversion of the whole world to God, including "the man of sin," is in the outset anti— Bible. The Mystic Harlot is not to be converted—but to be stripped naked and bare, and then to be burned with fire! O, that you and I, Sir, may avoid her sins, that we may also escape her plagues.

The church with which I stand connected have for more than twelve years maintained independent and opposite ground to the reigning errors of the day. And for our thus standing, we have been denounced, as Antinomians, Anti— Efforts and Anti— Missionists, &c. But, Sir, we cannot endorse the dogmas of unauthorized Boards and Conventions who "lord it over God's heritage." Believing, as we do, that the Church is the highest body ever constituted by the Lord Jesus, or his Apostles; we believe the Church to possess all the facilities necessary to carry into effect the designs of her Lord— without resorting to those humanly devised means and Societies, natural Ability, human Efforts, for rendering the grace of God effectual.

The preaching of the Gospel, sir, is an ordinance of "the King of Kings"—not to make sheep but to feed them. Therefore, the Lord Jesus has sent forth his angels or ministers, with the great sound of a trumpet— not to make—but to gather together his elect. This agrees with Paul's view of the subject, as he wrote to the Ephesians, viz: "And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers—for the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying the body of Christ." "Herein, we do rejoice and will rejoice."

ELDER FRANCIS BAKER TO ELDER D. BENEDICT.

Yours of the 15th of October last was received, with your printed circular, and their contents were considered. The answer has been necessarily delayed until now. Our apology for delay will be found in the fact that the meeting of the Association was late in November, the winter came on, and the committee did not meet directly. But there has been a meeting of a majority of the committee, at which it was resolved to decline furnishing any statistical materials for the publication of the history of the Primitive Baptists in Mississippi. And it was further resolved to request you not to give our history, nor mention us in any way in your book.

The reasons for this course of procedure on our part are as follows: 1. To do justice to the work, it was found that it required more time and labor, than the committee could bestow on the subject. 2. From some facts that have been developed, we are satisfied that the Missionary brethren have furnished materials from this State, through which, we have reason to fear that we may be misrepresented. 3. We are unwilling to furnish materials for one who has expressed so poor an opinion of the party as you have done in your letter to me. 4. We believe that your prejudices against the Old School Baptists are too strong to do them and their cause justice. 5. We cannot consent to furnish the weapons to break our own heads; or, in more respectful terms, we are unwilling to furnish the means, and pay the man to misrepresent us.

In the letter you wrote me, immediately after answering my enquiry, you complain in the following language, viz: "I am sorry I cannot find more candor and openness among the Anti— mission people; they write me well enough in private, but when they publish anything as brethren Watson, of Tenn., and Jewett, of New York, they show a disposition I do not like. The way they speak to me and of me, does not increase my good opinion of the party, but rather the other way." In the above you have expressed your unfavorable opinion "of the party"—of the whole party—because the publications of brethren have not met your approbation. In the above declared opinion, you have not only betrayed a want of charity, but you have also disclosed your prejudices against the party—the Anties as you are pleased to call us. And wherefore? Not because your private feelings or personal character have been disrespected. O, no; but their publications, which refer to systems, societies, principles, doctrines and practices with which you are associated, have not been approved by you.— Now, this was all as it should be; for should not those systems and societies be investigated, and their Divine authenticity established? or their fallacy exposed? But the brethren referred to can speak for themselves.

In the next place, you declare yourself to be an old school Baptist, and have long been a minister; and have had much to do in the denomination for more than forty years; and that you are neither anti— Mission nor antiEffort—adding, "the more I see and know of the party, the less opinion I have of the reasons of their separation from the main body of the Baptists." To which I will add that I, too, am an Old School Baptist, and perhaps your equal in years, if not in talents; and have also seen, heard and known much of the old Regular Baptists to the Southern States; and I have read their history in foreign climes and ancient times, and rejoice to be able to say in truth that the more I see and know of their faith and practice, the more I am united to that people.

On the contrary, it has been my unhappiness to have had but too intimate an acquaintance with the Effort or Missionary Baptists; and the more I see and know of their anti— scriptural systems, money— begging schemes, proselyting inventions, heretrodox principles, and salary preachers, "the less good opinion I have of the party." But you say that you are neither anti— Mission nor antiEffort." To which I reply that I am anti to both, according to the modern latitudinarian construction of the terms; for they are made to cover and embrace almost every system, society, principle, doctrine and practice, false and true, moral and religious, earthly and divine, that is now known or set up, on the face of the whole earth, which has for its avowed object the improvement of the condition of the human race. And what is strange and very objectionable is, that all these are made, or attempted to be made, parts and parcels of the Christian system; and all those who do not embrace and support them all, in their ramified departments, are denounced as Anties, opposed to the Gospel, and the spread of the Gospel. These things, as fairly stated above, are the causes, and produced the separation of which you complain. And I will here unite with you and say, "I, also, have but a poor opinion of the causes of separation."

You next request me to to "say in few words why we are against each of the offensive institutions; whether we are against them for their own sake, or on account of the manner in which they are conducted; and whether we have among our people anything of the kind under other names and forms." Answer: We are opposed to them because—1. They are anti— scriptural and unchristian. 2. They have a direct tendency to unite the church with the world, and the world with the church. 3. They produce discord, division and distress in the church.

To the first objection, viz: "their being anti— scriptural and anti— Christian. To this capital objection we invite the learned and talented brethren of the Missionary order to show from the Bible where the Ministry ever left the church and associated themselves with the world in Missionary societies for the advancement of the kingdom of Christ. Brother Benedict, as an avowed Old School Baptist, and a Baptist historian, you are called upon to show from the Bible, either precept or example for the modern Mission system—which of the inspired writers have recorded an account of the organization of a Missionary society? In what chapter shall we find an account of a Bible society? Or where under the whole heavens, except in "Mystery Babylon," was generated, brought forth and reared, that Institution which has been christened and called Sunday School Union? whose great object is to disseminate sectarian principles, and proselyte children to a profession of religion in their nonage; and thereby to build up anti— Christian sects, like Missionary Baptists.

Suppose the Apostles on the day of Pentecost, with the other disciples, one hundred and twenty in all, had formed a great Missionary Society in Jerusalem, upon the modern plan, viz: by associating with the spiteful Jews and Roman soldiers; Scribes and Elders; Doctors and Lawyers; Pharisees and S'aducees; with every other creature that could pay the entrance money,— King Agrippa, President; Pontius Pilate, Vice President: Gamaliel, Secretary, Caiaphas, Corresponding Secretary; Simon Magus, Treasurer—I stop to ask: What analogy, of what likeness would there have been between the practice of the Apostles in the execution of that commission which their Master gave them, and the Society as pictured above, in its operations? Could the wise, the learned, or sagacious, discover any likeness or similarity between the one and the other? We think not. Yet we are free to say, that there would have been, in our opinion, as much of Apostolic practice and likeness in that Jerusalem society as pictured above, as there is similarity between Modern Missionism and the preaching and practice of the Apostles. Now we, the Primitive Baptists, cannot fellowship such a heterogenous concourse, of saints and sinners, godly and ungodly, pagans and christians, believers and infidels, embracing those whose carnal hearts are "enmity against God, not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be." Nor do we think that such an amalgamated mass ever has or ever can engage in the promotion of that Kingdom which is not of this world; for he that gathereth not with us, scattereth; he that is not for us is against us. But the command is, "Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers; for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness, and what communion hath light with darkness? And what concord hath Christ with Belial? Or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel? And what agreement hath the temple of God with idols? For ye are the temple of the living God—Wherefore, COME OUT FROM AMONG THEM, AND BE YE SEPARATE, SAITH THE LORD, AND TOUCH NOT THE UNCLEAN THING, AND I WILL RECEIVE YOU"—2Co 6:14-17.

But some zealous Missionary brethren will yet object, and say 'that was a day of miracles, but this is a day of means.' Well, adopt that maxim, and the Scriptures cease to be a rule of faith and practice in these days of MEANS.

But it is objected again—'That the gospel of the kingdom must be preached in all the world for a witness, and that the preacher cannot preach, unless supported; and that this support must necessarily be supplied by the church, and carried out with him; and this society system is the only plan to raise that supply.' Those brethren who have adopted these views, have fallen into two capital mistakes. The first is in carrying supplies in direct opposition to an express prohibition of Christ, who said, "Provide neither gold, nor silver, nor brass in your purses—nor two coats, nor shoes," &c. This command seems valid, as it, or its like, is in four places in the gospel. And the reason given why they should not carry supplies, is that "the workman is worthy of his meat"; and as proof that those who went forth preaching the gospel and trusting in God, while they executed His high command, "Go ye into all the world," &c, were and should be supplied, the Master asked the Disciples on a certain occasion—"when I sent ye without purse or scrip, lacked ye anything?" they said "Nothing Lord." Where, then, the necessity for the society system? How very different the answer of the disciples from the views of those who trust in Systems, Societies, Money and the world; and whose employ is begging, and their whole theme is money.

The other mistake is, that the Missionary preachers have been trained by their party to trust in the world, and in the men of the world, for their supplies, while they have sown their Arminian stuff! The Lord has pronounced a curse on all that trust in man, saying— "Cursed be the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm." And this curse evidently marks the missionary progress; for in addition to the divisions in churches, associations, and the denomination generally, fifty years hard begging has failed to supply the insatiable desire for money, with which the party seems intoxicated. Revivals are made subservient to this moneygetting business; the day of rest is devoted to this sacriligious system of begging; and the worship of God is prostituted to this golden calf, which is now set up in what are called Baptist churches; and the Ministry— the learned Ministry—who have taken their course in theology—are not only engaged in it, but take the lead in this nefarious system!

We have thus given you the reasons in part for our opposition to the so— called benevolent institutions. And it is our plan to keep up our opposition to an indefinite degree.

You speak of the divisions among the Baptists as a family difficulty among brethren, and the least said of it the better; and that you have no idea of its long continuance. Now, sir, I must be allowed to think and say, that you are not a good judge of what constitutes a spiritual family and spiritual brethren. For, if we may judge from appearances, they could never have had one father; for if there is any likeness between them, except they are all fond of water, I cannot see it. And certain it is, that they are not agreed in Faith; and you will allow that we differ essentially in practice; for while you do everything which relates to the worship of God and the spread of the Gospel, by money and means, we seek 'to worship God in spirit, rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh.' Yea, we preach Christ crucified, without the aid of Societies, schools or conventions; and that, too, without money and without price —having no salary men among us.

But, Bro. Benedict, we have some of your over zealous Missionary preachers in this country, who have a great desire to preach to certain communities, but cannot without a stated salary, say six hundred dollars; and when the salary is in hand, or well secured, they can preach eloquently, exhort warmly, sing melodiously, pray devoutly, and weep bitterly over sinners. But to use the vulgar phrase of a coarse— bred gentleman— "They may all go to hell for him except he receive the salary." Now, sir, you, and men of finer taste than myself, may object to the style of the above, but is neverthe less a fair picture of facts; yes, of the practice of Missionary men and doings in this country. And as reflecting men we believe that the love of money is the main spring and cause of all their devotion to God and Missions. We think if the money should be removed, it would be "no longer pipe no longer dance," no longer pay no longer preach; no more money, then, no more Missionaries to the heathen.

But you seem to think that the family difficulty will not be of long continuance. While we approve a pacific disposition, we would have you to recollect that family difficulties are sometimes hard to settle. And, if ever the difficulty alluded to is settled, the New School or Missionary Baptists will have to come back to Old Baptist ground.

In another part of your letters, you are pleased to say: "The Parker two— seed humbug is a miserable affair, and a disgrace to any body of men, and so it will be viewed when men come to their sober senses in future time." Now, sir, I cannot see why this humbug was dragged into the correspondence, unless it was to reflect on the denomination through that miserable affair, as you are pleased to term it. Be the object what it may, you who "have had much to do in the denomination for more than forty years" cannot be ignorant of the fact, that the Old School Baptists as a denomination never received the two— seed system or doctrine, as held by Daniel Parker. And you must also have known, that the Old School Baptists in Tennessee, where Parker disseminated his theory, did formally condemn and reject the doctrine— But should some brethren have been ultra in their views on this subject, are there no ultras or fanatics among the New School or Missionary Baptists? Have you no heresies in doctrine?

If it is your conclusion that you are free from heresies, and consequently may cast stones at other denominations, look at some of your preachers, who preach any and every doctrine, that will move the passions, excite the feelings, increase your numbers, and loose the pursestrings. So wild and profuse are they in their proselyting declamations, that it is difficult to know of what faith, what sect, or what religion they are; except they touch Baptism, and then they will turn the world upside down, and raise arguments strong enough to move a mountain, in favor of the one Baptism. But the subjects may have as many faiths, and such qualities as best suit their prejudices or carnal inclinations—provided they are favorable to the Missionary Enterprize.

In the last place, you charge us with "Another thing which is all wrong among the Anti— people. Your votes of unfellowship; this is anti— Republican, and contrary to all the principles and usages of the Baptists. I put a double veio on the whole concern on either side." Now, sir, you must be either ignorant, or forgetful that fellowship, the right of fellowship belongs to christians, churches, and denominations; and that they always have, and ever will use that right. The Apostles exercised that right freely against false doctrines, and false teachers in their day. And were they anti— Republican? Was Paul acting contrary to Baptist usage when he said— "Though we or an angel from heaven preach any other gospel unto you, than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed." And yet your Effort preachers can and do preach any gospel that may best suit the times and circumstances; and all this you can fellowship, and call it Baptist usage and Republicanism. But I call your attention to some instances of the exercise of the right of fellowship by the Apostles, that will strain the nerves of some men to approve, viz: the rebuke of Simon Peter on Ananiah and Sapphira. It seems to me, that a Missionary would have received one half, and let them off with their lie; and that he would have bartered off the gift of the Holy Ghost to Simon Magus for his large money. And as proof that they would, they sell titles and life membership in Societies, to the men of this world, and make them managers in what they are pleased to call the kingdom of Christ; and for large money, they make them honorary members and managers for life.

Sir, I cannot but think that you and your people would have received that "large sum of money," and would have fellowshipped Mr. Magus according to "your Baptist usage and Republicanism." Yes, and to extend and perpetuate the right of fellowship, and your Baptist usage, you would take Demetrius the silversmith, and Alexander the coppersmith, and every other Smith and every other human creature, that can raise and advance the entrance money; and would embrace them all as the lovers of Christ, and co— workers with you in the great cause; while at the same time denouncing the Old School Baptists as anties, and opposers of the Gospel; and acting contrary to Baptist usage; consequently you put a double veto on us and our acts. But "none of these things move us." We shall still "stand in the ways and see, and ask for the good old paths, where is the good way, and walk therein," and observe the Lord's command, "Wherefore, come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing, and I will receive you."

REMARKS

The foregoing extracts have been promiscuously taken from the many letters addressed to Mr. Benedict; besides, he received all the Old School Baptist periodicals published in the United States, as well as the Minutes of many Associations—in fact, he acknowledges, on page 936, that "A large amount of their documents are before me, which contain the resolutions and decrees of their churches and associations." And instead of publishing them as he had promised to do, he suppressed them, and then asserts ,on page 935, that their history could not be obtained.

We have now devoted as much time and space to Mr. Benedict, and his History, as our limits will admit. It would, perhaps, be admissible, however, to show what a ridiculous dilemma he has voluntarily placed himself in, through the influence of a malicious spirit. He says, in his late History that—

"The anti-Mission movement must of necessity be a short-lived one. It has within itself the elements of its dissolution; and before my steroytyped pages could reach the different parts of the country, to say nothing of remoter regions, it will be among the things that are past and forgotten."

Well, his History has been published several years, and the Old School Baptists still exist, and are in at least as prosperous a condition, and as strongly opposed to Missionism, as when the above prophecy was made; and ithough it may be exceedingly mortifying to Mr. Benedict, they will continue to exist, and to oppose Missionism, whether his sterotyped pages ever should reach the different parts of the country or not. This, then, necessarily brings up a new question; and though somewhat metaphysical, we should be pleased to have it solved. And that is, whether Mr. Benedict had rather be branded with the name of false prophet, and enjoy a large sale of books and a big pile of money, or that his "sterotyped pages could (NOT) reach the different parts of the country, to say nothing of remoter regions," and the truth of his prophecy stand unimpeachable.

The Missionary leaders have been for the last half century attempting a regular siege of Babylon, intending "to carry the assault to the very gate of the enemy, to storm his garrison, and drive him from his last entrenchment." And though the great mass of their followers, having eyes see not what they are doing, yet the following extract from Mr. Benedict's History would seem to indicate that he, at least, had some glimmering view of the final result. If so, in what condition must his conscience be, to permit him for filthy lucre's sake, to encourage such a state of affairs? Here is the quotation, viz:

"This whole subject, however, I must dismiss for the present, with one single remark: while Babylon is taken at one end, a new race of Babvlonians may be coming in at the other."

The weapons of their warfare are mighty through money to the pulling down of strongholds. But the true christian's "weapons of warfare are not carnal but mighty through God," &c, "casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ."

It seems hard for the Missionaries to understand that the christian warfare is directed against vain and foolish imaginations, that are ever exalting something against the knowledge of God; and that the object of this warfare is to become reconciled to God, and to bring into captivity every thought to the obedience of Christ—"obedience is better than sacrifice."

Notwithstanding all the hard speeches which have been spoken against the Old School Baptists for their refusing to countenance the Missionary system, and the stale insinuation that covetousness is the cause, yet, we assure the reader, that such a charge is made through a demagogue spirit, by those who are unable to meet the question by legitimate arguments. Could millions of money be obtained from a foreign source for the support of Missions, still we should repudiate the whole system, as religiously filthy and unclean. And as to the support of the Gospel Ministry in a gospel manner, it is a part of our platform; and if it is not done, it is a neglect of duty, of which we acknowledge ourselves guilty in many other cases. But— —while on the subject—we feel authorized to say, that the Old School ministry are some how or some how else better provided for than the New School ministry, or else they are more patient and forbearing— for the difference between them in begging money is so wide and so well understood that a comparison is unnecessary. And as to the ministerial labor performed by the former; it is not uncommon for one Elder or Preacher to attend two, three, and sometimes four churches, besides special appointments, and an occasional circuit among the churches.

 

GRO23 CONCLUSION - AN ADDRESS TO THE GENERAL READER CHAPTER XXIII

CONCLUSION

AN ADDRESS TO THE GENERAL READER

The leading object of this work, from the time the subject was first moved in the Primitive Association, has been not only to set forth the History of the Primitive Baptists,of Mississippi, but also to show to all concerned that they now occupy the same platform of principles that the Primitive or Regular Baptists have ever done as far back as their history can be traced. In pursuance of this object, we were constrained to begin with the Apostolic churches, as set forth in the word of unerring truth, from which we have shown an epitome of the plan adopted by the Comforter for sending the Gospel everywhere, and also the plan adopted by the churches for settling important difficulties.

We have then shown, by quotations from the writings of the Waldenses, that our platform of principles was maintained among that people. And from the writings of the learned Dr. Mosheim, who is no friend to the Baptists, we have shown that they and their principles have existed "in almost all the European countries, and that their origin was hid in the remote depths of antiquity."

We have shown that, nearly two hundred years ago, upwards of one hundred churches or congregations of the Particular or Regular Baptist order met by delegates in London and published their articles of faith, which are substantially as those of the Primitive or Regular Baptists of the present day.

We have exposed the Fuller heresy, which resulted in the modern Missionary plan for evangelizing the world. And also the "damnable heresies" practiced by the Missionaries "by reason of whom the way of truth is evil spoken of." "And through conveteousness they, with feigned words, make merchandize" of their brethren, sisters and friends—men, women, children and servants of their own land—and also the heathen; over whom, wherever they dare, they exercise a fiendish sway. And we will here venture the opinion that, if by divine providence the baneful system and corrupt conduct of these false teachers among the heathen should be fully exposed, before God sends strong delusions on this subject, ninetenths of those who are now aiding and abetting this proselyting band of imposters would withdraw from them as they would from a serpent's bite or a scorpion's sting.

In conducting the History of the Primitive Baptists of this State, our object has been to portray principles and not men; in which truth constrained us to show that there were two kinds of people in the churches, from the introduction of the Missionary scheme till the separation took place. And in the lower part of the State these same two kinds of people, as prefigured by Isaac and Ishmael—brethren in the flesh but not so in the spirit—are still living together, with a fearful preponderating influence in favor of the Missionary party. What will be the final result, we can only say, in the language of the Prophet, "O Lord God thou knowest."

We have endeavored to arrange this history in such a manner, that those who feel sufficiently concerned to peruse it, may learn our platform of principles from different persons and assemblies, in different ages and sections of the world, all harmonizing in one faith and practice, And though Balaam has been hired to curse us, and though he has said many ugly things about us, yet the substance of one of his reproaches we accept as a blessing, viz: "As to doctrinal sentiments, it is not necessary to give them for each church claiming to be Old School Baptists, for they are so nearly alike that the creed of one will answer for the whole."

We now propose a few general remarks relative to the Bible, Godliness, and the leading traits of Primitive Baptist principles. In doing so, taking the Scriptures as our rule, we are necessarily obliged to view the human family as divided into two classes of people, through all the generations of men, from Cain and Abel up to the present time. To do otherwise would be wilfully rejecting the truth, as set forth in the revelation of God to men, and tenaciously clinging to the dictates of the carnal mind. It has ever been the object of Antichrist to reconcile God to men, instead of men to God. Hence the great effort to wrest the word of truth from its true meaning, and to work wonders in proselyting in the name of Jesus Christ, calling on God to bless the dictates of the carnal heart.

Godliness is a matter that cannot be understood by the carnal mind. It is a mystery—"and without controversy it is a great mystery"—and it would be impossible for any man to communicate this mystery to any but those whose hearts have been circumcised, ears unstopt, and eyes opened by the power of the living God. But, though the carnal understanding cannot see and appreciate this great mystery, which is revealed for the benefit of God's children, yet it can see and appreciate the general outlines of the Scriptures, as revealed for the government of God's subjects. And the obstinate rejection of this manifests the deep mystery of iniquity, against which God has so often visited his fierce indignation.

In the fall of man into transgression, he received an impress upon the conscience of the knowledge of good and evil. And the conduct of Cain, subsequent to slaying his brother, proves his consciousness of guilt. But we shall come directly to the Christian religion and those who were taught out of the Bible.

Herod knew it was wrong to slay all the children of Bethlehem and coasts thereof, out of mere suspicion that his throne was in danger. The people of Nazareth knew that it was wrong to seize a peaceable man and attempt to destroy him, because he (Jesus) preached a doctrine repugnant to their feelings.—See 4th chapter of Luke. The chief Priests and Scribes knew it was wrong to bear false witness against Jesus, saying, "we found this fellow perverting the nation, and forbidding to give tribute to Caesar," and finally to hire Judas to betray his master, to seek false witness, to put him to death, to spit in his face and buffet him while a prisoner at the bar, and to smite him and make sport of him while on trial.

Pilate knew that the charge against him was false, and that he could find no fault in him; that for envy they had delivered him, and that Jesus was a just man. He knew it was wrong, for the sake of popularity with the multitude, to scourge such a person, and then to deliver him to be crucified.

Although all these combined, with the Bible in their hands, were incapable of recognizing Jesus as the Lord of glory—"for if they had, they would not have crucified him"—yet they did know, not only from that impress made upon the conscience of every man that cometh into the world, but also from the principles of justice and propriety taught in the Scriptures, that, with wicked hands and lying lips, they were attempting to accomplish a fiendish deed. Nevertheless, to cap the climax of their deep depravity, these pompous, self— righteous priests, while trembing with fear, hired the Roman soldiers to tell a lie, in order to hide the resurrection of Jesus.

Without doubt, pious young men may be brought up at the feet of Gamaliel, and so trained in school theology as to become conscientious persecutors of the true followers of Christ. But this is through the influence of Priest craft, and not the dictates of natural justice, or the Bible. And hence the great necessity for every individual to search the Scriptures, in order to guard against those who teach things which they ought not, for filthy lucre's sake.

The pretenders to the true religion, under the Mosaic dispensation, persecuted and killed the true prophets.— And under the Gospel dispensation, the same class have crucified Christ with wicked hands, and persecuted his true followers even to this present day. And though they are incapable of discerning spiritual things, yet they do know that it is a violation of every principle of justice and propriety to belie, calumniate, and persecute, in word or deed, those who are quiet and peaceable citizens, because they hold a doctrine repugnant to their feelings.

We shall now proceed to show the law of grace, as it presents itself to the natural mind. There is no necessary connection between the external and internal word. A person may hear the external word preached, or read for a life— time, without being spiritually benefitted. Yea, converted persons may, and often do, hear it preached or read without any sensible benefit—being, in spite of all their efforts, cold and lukewarm and lifeless. While, at other times, traveling over the same ground, that is hearing the same promises preached or read, they are fed, and edified and comforted. This, then, shows that spiritual blessings are above and beyond the reach of any, whether converted or not; which would not be the case, if they could, by the use of means, obtain them when they pleased.

In relation to the decrees of God, though there can be no difference in point of time, yet we hold that there must necessarily be a difference in point of order. Creation stands first; and God, by his perfect wisdom and foreknowledge, seeing the fall of man, decreed the salvation of the elect, including all the means. According to this order, he has been pleased to manifest them in the beginning. These are matters founded wholly on the sovereignty of God, "for so it seemed good in his sight," and you need not look elsewhere for a reason.

All Christian denominations admit that God was under no obligation to save any of the fallen race of man—and indeed they could not do otherwise without reproaching him for suffering Satan to enter—but in doing so, the Arminians give up every inch of ground on which they charge him with injustice, "if he saves a portion without giving all an equal chance"; for, being under no obligation to save any, there is no rule of reasoning known among men that would make the bestowing of an unmerited blessing upon a few undeserving creatures, an obligation to bestow a like blessing upon all.

There is but one other position which their ingenuity can assume; and that is, that God has graciously revealed a plan by which all the human race may be saved. And this is the position of the Arminian world. Though they may be divided into hundreds of different denominations on minor points, and though some of them may have a predestinarian faith written in their church— books, yet they all agree in this one thing—that Christ laid down his life equally for all the human family.

Such a hypothesis necessarily leads to the absurd conclusion, that Christ laid down his life for the millions who had been, at the time of his crucifixion, overthrown by the fierce anger of God, in floods of water, fire, and other manifestations of his wrath, as well as for the saints.— This dilemma was seen by the acute and shrewd Andrew, Fuller; and hence he set forth an indefinite atonement, and contended in substance that Christ laid down his life, neither for the sheep nor goats, but for sin; and, by his atonement, provided a common store— house of grace, to which all were equally invited.

Nevertheless, for the apparent purpose of cozening the predestinarians, he contended, or rather admitted, that there is a discriminating speciality in the application of this grace—that is, though it was provided for all equally alike, yet it is applied or given to none but the elect. This, when stripped of Mr. Fuller's sophistry and smooth circular mode of reasoning, is nothing more nor less than holding forth the idea that God provided salvation for all, invited all to partake, and then placed it in reach of some and out of reach of others. Of all the doctrine known among christian denominations, this general atonement and special application is the most dishonoring to the Trinity. It represents a diversity of purpose in the Godhead. It was, however, an unavailing effort on the part of Mr. Fuller to reconcile predestination with Arminianism. Hence, it is not uncommon for this class of christians to have a predestinarian faith in their church book, while at the same time they will burlesque it by saying, "it is unprofitable, discouraging, leads to licentiousness, and should not be preached."

We have said, and we now say again, that the Arminian world, though divided into various sects on minor doctrines, yet are all substantially the same on leading points of theology. They all harmonize on this one great cardinal point—that salvation is dependant on the act of the natural man, some requiring more and some less as a condition. Against this the predestinarians contend— that, though agreeable to our natural feelings, it is contrary to the revealed word of God; that, if the Arminian plan had been set up, then, instead of God's saving some, none ever would have been saved; for if man, in his most perfect created state, failed to perform so small a condition of preservation, how could he now, while dead in trespasses and in sin, perform so great a condition of eternal salvation.

The Old School Baptists contend that election is the eternal, sovereign, unconditional, particular, and immutable act of God, whereby he selected some from among all mankind, out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation, to be redeemed and everlastingly saved by Christ. And that, in pursuance thereof, Christ laid down his life for the sheep; and though the goats are greatly blessed thereby, temporarily, yet it is an incidental blessing, and not a special.

As it is not our purpose to discuss these high points of theology, but merely to hold them up to the general reader as matter of history, it may be necessary here to remark, that, though predestinarians all agree as to the plan of salvation revealed in the word of God, yet there is some slight shades of difference as to the practical manner of the application. This difference generally consists more in the imperfection of language and the incapacity of finite minds to grasp so great a subject, than otherwise. Some, however, have run their notions of eternal union between Christ and his church out into the ocean of infinity, where they become bewildered; and before returning to confines of Scripture revelation, they imagined that they saw two seed in the flesh, as well as an eternal, self— existing Devil. They then set about hunting up Scripture texts and forcing them to sustain their position. Such a course was pursued by Daniel Parker, until the Old School Baptists were constrained to remonstrate against it. This, however, instead of having the desired effect, in restraining him within Scripture bounds, fired his unwarrantable zeal. He finally carried his two— seed notions to such lengths, that they withdrew their fellowship from him and all his followers.

No matter how many blunders a child may make in a child— like spirit, the parent is sure to look upon him with complacency and pleasure. But when he becomes fully grown—and especially if he should become a head and shoulder taller than common folks—should he pride himself in doubtful disputations on speculative points of theology, to the wounding of feelings among brethren, who are equally sound in the doctrines of the household, there is just grounds to believe that such a course would meet with the disapprobation of a wise and good parent.

In the eternal counsel of God, in arranging the plan of salvation, a treasure was laid up in Christ as trustee for the elect. This treasure is called grace, eternal life, Christ formed in you, &c. So far as we know, the Old School Baptists generally ask nothing more on this point than to keep in the mind a proper distinction between this treasure and the persons of the saints. The former, according to the Scriptures, had an eternal existence in Christ; but the latter was created in Adam. And be the treasure what it may, it is a gift unto the elect.

The Primitive Baptists hold that there is no natural difference between the sheep and goats, but, that there is a legal difference before the conversion of the former. And we know not how better to illustrate to the general reader than by supposing a great sovereign to enter up an irrevocable decree, adopting prospectively a certain number of his rebellious subjects as his children, and leaving the balance to abide the due course of law. Though there is no difference whatever in themselves, yet the reader must see by the illustration, that there is a legal difference; and that the former are safe to the full extent of the power and faithfulness of the sovereign. Therefore, the elect are as safe before conversion as they are afterwards.

A strong case in point is the thief on the cross. We may readily suppose, if the spirits of darkness know the elect, that they were in fiendish glee at the prospect of defeating the purposes of grace, at least in one instance. Justly condemned for his crimes; and even joined his fellow— thief in casting indignity into the teeth of his Saviour, nevertheless, in spite of his own corruption, and the powers of earth and hell, just in time his heart was touched by the Spirit of adoption—he was quickened into life—his eyes were opened—he saw—he believed. And true to principle, as a needle touched by a true magnet points to the pole, he looked to Jesus Christ and cried. "Lord remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom." The gracious reply is well known to all concerned on the subject. "It is not of works lest any man should boast"—but "it is to him that works not, but believeth on Him who justifieth the ungodly."

That this doctrine has ever been hated and opposed by the world, the flesh, and the great enemy of grace, is true beyond controversy. It is shot at from behind a hundred masked batteries; and that too by those who pretend to love Him who revealed it to man. Among all the enemies of this doctrine, none are so effectual as those who pretend to believe it, and give it a place in their church books, and at the same time hold up before the world, doctrines and practices in direct opposition to it.

But, though the opposition hate this doctrine and revile it—though they are offended because Ishmael was not made an heir with Isaac—though they are filled with wrath at the idea of Jacob being loved and Esau hated before either had done good or evil, yet, it is hard to conceive on rational principles, why they should persecute those who receive it. That they should seize the prophets of God, and finally His Son, and put them to death, and then persecute even to this day, those who follow the Son in this doctrine, while at the same time they profess to love God, is a mystery of iniquity indeed. But "they flatter him with their mouth, and lie unto him with their tongues. For their heart is not right with him, neither are they steadfast in his covenant." Though king Ahab pretended to inquire of the Lord and to follow his counsel, yet, he persecuted His prophets for declaring the word of God—and followed the advice of the multitude, to his own destruction.

As the mixing law and grace, temporal salvation and eternal salvation, natural life and spiritual life, has caused such a confusion of ideas, it may not be out of place to state the views, agreeing with the predestinarian Baptist doctrine, relative to those who are under the law. We mean that law under which all mankind fell by transgression, and from under which the elect were redeemed. We read of a law of a carnal commandment; and though this more especially alludes to the priesthood under the ceremonial law, yet it shows clearly, that God addresses himself to the carnal mind, relative to carnal or temporal affairs. And though it is possible for man to fulfil the spirituality of the moral law, yet we are taught in the Scriptures, that when the stiff— necked and rebellious Israelites would draw nigh unto God and keep the law, in its literal meaning, he would draw nigh unto them and bless them with a long catalogue of temporal blessings, according to promise. Notwithstanding His course towards them was so plain on this subject that none could misunderstand it, still they gradually grew worse and worse, until he destroyed them out of his presence as a nation; and scattered them among the nations of the earth, for their intolerable insolence and disregard of the moral law of God.

The same principle of dealing was manifested towards the Ninevites. They were threatened with destruction for their wickedness, which had gone up before God; and they averted their overthrow by humbling themselves in sack— cloth and ashes.

The law has never been repealed. Nothing but temporal blessings were ever promised under it—and no one is authorized to say or believe that God is less propitious now in granting these legal blessings, than on any former occasion. The minds of men have been confused on this subject by mixing, or attempting to mix, law and grace. "He that keepeth the law, happy is he." Again: "When a man's ways please the Lord, he maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him." This, being inconsistent with God's dealing with his children, must be spoken of His subjects under the law. Though Solomon, from whose proverbs the above quotations were taken, alluded to many things pertaining to grace, yet his leading object seems to be, to lay down a rule of action to promote the temporal welfare of man—that is, "he gave his heart to seek and search out by wisdom concerning all things that are done under heaven." And he arrived at this conclusion, that "There is nothing better for a man than that he should eat and drink, and that he should make his soul enjoy good in his labor. This also I saw, that it was from the hand of God." Again: "Eat thy bread with joy, and drink thy wine with a merry heart; for God now accepteth thy works"—that is, the works of those who live according to these proverbs of morality, which are so pathetically addressed to the sons of men.

As a general rule, therefore, those who approximate nearest to this Bible morality, enjoy the greatest amount of happiness in this life. In the absence of suitable illustrations, and a definite rule by which they could go inside of outside appearances, and correctly assess the amount of happiness enjoyed by each individual, many may be led to doubt the above scriptural inferences, when applied to persons. Nevertheless we feel safe in affirming, that, apart from the dealings of God with his children, in leading them through tribulation for their future benefit, with which those under the law have nothing to do, the above rule is in strict accordance to the word of Divine revelation.

When we turn our attention to the nations of the earth, this great truth is so manifest that intelligent infidels have acknowledged the Bible entitled to that much credit. And we will here remark, that if the efforts of Sunday schools and some other societies had been devoted exclusively to teaching and enforcing this important truth separate and apart from religion, no Old School Baptist within the range of our knowledge would oppose them. "I know Abraham," says the Great Author of Revelation, "that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord, to do JUSTICE and JUDGMEN T." "Justice and judgment is more acceptable to the Lord than sacrifice." Again, from the New Testament: "Honor thy father and thy mother, which is the first commandment with promise; that it maybe well with thee, and that thou mayest live long on the EARTH. And ye, fathers, provoke not your children to wrath; but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord"—that is, "to do JUSTICE and JUDGMENT." It was at first understood that the Sunday School Union was designed for this purpose. But the spirit of missions soon daubed it with religion: and then the Primitive Baptists were constrained to repudiate it, as well as all the fascinating brood of which the Missionary system is composed.

In relation to a future state, though mankind are by an inherited nature under condemnation, and though they cannot extricate themselves from this condition, yet their judgment will not be according to these latent principles, but "according to the deeds done in the body"—that is, according to the extent to which these latent principles are drawn out and put in practice. Hence, we read of "Heaping up wrath against the day of wrath, and righteous judgment of God; who will render to every man according to his DEEDS."

And it is an important fact, that all the bitter woes in the New Testament are mainly levelled against christian hypocrites, who preach a false Gospel, a false Jesus, a false Christ, encompass sea and land to make proselytes, and work wonderful things in the name of the Lord— thus acting as satellites of Satan, in blurring over the true character of Jesus Christ and his religion. "Satan himself is transformed into an angel of light; therefore it is no great thing if his ministers also be transformed as the ministers of righteousness, whose end shall be according to their works."

Although the human family are clearly represented in the Scriptures are divided into two classes, under law and under grace, yet none are permitted to know one from the other, except by their fruits. Paul was notified, that God had much people in Corinth, still he did not know them personally. Hence, wherever he was permilted to preach, he preached the Gospel to all men indiscriminately.

"Ye shall know them by their fruits." This is the only rule given by which they can be known. And were it not for the hypocrisy of men, it would be a sufficient one for all. But the skill of hypocrites is so acute at counterfeiting, "that if it were possible, they would deceive the very elect." "The fruit of the Spirit is, love, joy, peace, long— suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance—against such there is no law."

And in conclusion of this part of the subject, we will here remark, that there is not one instance, in all the New Testament, in which permission is granted to those under grace, which would in the slightest degree militate against the welfare of human society—or against the rules and regulations of any of the governments of the earth. When Jesus said: "I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter— in— law against her mother— in— law; and a man's foes shall be they of his own household"—it was evidently predicated on human depravity—that is, when any are truly converted, they are hated without a cause. To send sheep among wolves would certainly produce war, but the fault would not be in the sheep.

The followers of Christ are commanded to "live peaceably with all men so far as in their power lies." And especially are they commanded to submit to the rules and regulations of governments. To illustrate clearly, suppose there were Old School Baptists in the State of Maine, as we fondly hope and believe there are—what would be their course relative to that law which forbids the use of wine? In answer we will state what we consider consistent with their profession. They will forego the use of wine on ordinary occasions; but they will use it in the sacrament, and quietly and peaceably suffer the consequences. Though they may exercise the rights of citizens, by insisting on its repeal, yet they cannot openly resist the law or secretly evade it. Yea, though they knew that every member of the Legislature who voted for it, were mesmerized by Satan, yet, they are bound to obey the law, or quietly abide the consequences.

The foregoing views are in accordance with the christian religion, and the platform of principles of the Old School Baptists. And if any of the true followers of Christ should disregard these divine regulations, they will fall into the hands of one who knows how to use the chastening rod. One who has said, "If his children forsake my law, and walk not in my judgments; if they break my statutes, and keep not my commandments; then will I visit their transgression with the rod, and their iniquity with stripes: nevertheless, my loving kindness will I not utterly take from him, nor suffer my faithfulness to fail; my covenant will I not break, nor alter the thing that is gone out of my lips. A record is made of one instance in which He took the natural life of one of His prophets for being deceived into an act of disobedience. But the lion, by which the deed was done, so far from carrying out the instinct of his nature, by devouring the "carcass," stood sentinel and guarded off all other animals, till an escort arrived to bury the dead.— See 1Ki 13.

There is one other subject to which we would call the attention, and show the marked difference between the Old School Baptists and the New School Baptists— We allude to the subject of Slavery. It is a positive institution of government as well as the Bible. This is sufficient for all true Christians, without proving the fact that it is the most happy condition of the black race. So far as the Old School Baptists are concerned, you might take your servant and travel through all the Northern States without being insulted or injured. Should you be a brother, and treat your servant contrary to the rule laid down in the Gospel, they might charge the fault upon your conscience, which would be their duty. But as to holding a slave under the strict rule for servants, you would hear nothing against it.

That the abolition spirit crossed the Atlantic in the same vessel with the missionary spirit, could be easily demonstrated. Both lead directly to the disturbance of civil government, whenever and whatever they dare attempt it. And with the control of the normal schools, to manufacture teachers of a certain siripe, for training the youthful mind; and their corrupting infuence in religious matters; they will soon exercise an influence in this Republic, over the political mind, that will defy all peaceable opposition.

The following extracts are taken from the Signs of ihe Times, an Old School Baptist paper published in the State of New York. It has now reached its 20th volume, and has correspondents from all the Northern States.— — The editor says:

"We are happy to assure such of our readers as are unacquainted with their brethren of the Northern States that, extensive as our knowledge is of the Old School Baptists, we do not know an Old School Baptist on earth that is an abolitionist, or who favors the cause, or has any sympathy with the disorganizing party of fanatics called abolitionists." Dec. 1, 1850.

Again:

"With brother Bell, and in common with all the brethren, we deeply regret that a dark and portentous cloud should seem to threaten the perpetuity of our federal compact; but we feel a consciousness that the Old School Baptists of the North have had no hand in its production—that they have never uttered the first word to exasperate, nor taken the first step to infringe upon the rights of their Southern brethren and fellow— citizens. It is our firm belief that the various branches of antichrist, and the newly invented religious institutions of the nineteenth century have been the principal agents in sowing the seeds of discord between the sister states of our great Republic. As the domineering infatuation of anti— christian demagogues has exerted an influence detrimental to the cause of freedom and the rights of men and of States, so let the influence of Old Schoolism be of a conservative character, and let us trust the event to God." Aug. 1, 1851.

As to politics. Perhaps some persons may think it strange that nearly all the Old School Baptists are State Rights Republicans. But if their form of government, and strict construction principles were duly considered, it would appear more wonderful that any of them should be otherwise. Their churches are united in Associations for their mutual welfare. And they have ever claimed the right of secession, in case of a palpable violation of the letter or spirit of the constitution, each judging for itself. It is impossible to assume any sensible medium between this and the concentration of despotic power in the Association, against which the churches are ever watchful. This make the Association cautious against assuming powers not delegated.

As long as the churches remain true to their primitive principles, the Association can do no harm. But when a portion of them become corrupt, through the influence of false doctrine, then, and not till then, an opportunity is afforded for designing men to bring in a multitude of isms, at war with the fundamental principles of true Christianity. This state of affairs is invariably followed by strife and contention, until they become emphatically two people, in all the leading points of doctrine and practice. And a final separation is the inevitable result.

The love of the Baptist Union causes the Old School Baptists previous to the separation to submit to many wrongs and outrages; and to contend earnestly for a restoration of gospel order. But in spite of all their entreaties, and earnest appeals to their New School brethren against heresy in doctrines and practice, primitive principles were wholly disregarded. The Old School Baptists finally found themselves reduced to the painful condition, in which they were forced to give up the system of religion established by their Lord and Master and his inspired Apostles, or in obedience to the Divine injunction, "Come out from among them and be separate."